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| University of Illinois. 

A CLASS. BOOK. VOLUME. 



Accession No. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



FOR THE YEAR 1900 



PART 



PART I — Reports of Trustees. President, Treasurer and 
Heads of Departments ; Annual Catalogue. 

Part II — Report of the Director of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 



AUGUSTA 

KENNEBEC JOURNAL PRINT 
1901 



CONTENTS OF PART I. 



Report of the Board of Trustees, 5 

Report of the President, 7 

Report of the Treasurer, 19 

Reports of the Departments : 

The School of Law, 21 

English, 23 

Latin, 24 

Greek 25 

Modern Languages, 26 

Philosophy, 28 

Political Economy and History, 29 

Mathematics and Astronomy, 30 

Physics and Electrical Engineering 31 

Chemistry, 33 

Biological Chemistry, 35 

Pharmacy, 36 

Biology, 38 

Agriculture, 39 

Horticulture, 41 

Animal Industry, 42 

Civil Engineering, 43 

Mechanical Engineering, 44 

Electrical Engineering, 48 

Librarian, 51 

in The Catalogue. 



54936 



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in 2013 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



To the Honorable Governor and Executive Council of Maine: 

The Trustees of the University of Maine respectfully submit their 
thirty-second annual report with the report of the President and 
Treasurer. 

The report of President Harris, as usual, is thorough and complete in 
its consideration of the affairs of the University. 

There has been but one change in the Board of Trustees during the 
year. The term of Mr. A. L. Moore expired in August and Hon. A. J. 
Durgin was appointed his successor. Mr. Moore graduated from the 
University in 1879, was appointed trustee in 1886 and served faithfully 
in that capacity fourteen years. He had the honor to succeed his father, 
Hon. Luther Moore of Limerick, who was trustee of the institution seven 
years. Mr. Durgin is a resident of Orono, where the University is 
located, and has for years been a staunch friend of the institution. He 
has worked to promote its interests as a member of the legislature and in 
other positions, and will undoubtedly render it excellent service as 
trustee. 

The many changes in the faculty are referred to in the report of Presi- 
dent Harris. The new members of this body are men of unquestioned 
ability. The University lost a most able and conscientious member of 
the faculty by the death of Prof. Francis L. Harvey. He served the 
institution with fidelity and success for fourteen years, holding ever the 
esteem, respect and love of his associates. 

The work of improving the campus has been continued. About 
$3,000.00 has been expended in repairing and extending the heating plant, 
and further expenditures will have to be made for new boilers in the 
immediate future. It is hoped that a central heating plant, sufficient to 
heat all the main buildings in a satisfactory and economical manner, will 
soon be possible. 

Necessary expenditures have been made to increase the equipment of 
different departments, the largest item being about $2,400.00 for the 
Department of Electrical Engineering. 

The buildings are generally in good condition. Repairs have been 
made wherever necessary. An Observatory building has been erected 
for the Department of Astronomy. The construction of a drill hall and 
gymnasium building was begun in the early part of the year, the corner 
stone being laid by Governor Powers on June 12th. This building, now 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

nearly completed, is constructed of brick and stone, with steel trusses 
and slate roof; and in addition to its value as a drill hall and gymnasium 
will meet important wants of the University, one of which is safe and 
commodious chapel accommodations. It will cost about $28,000. The 
funds for its construction are being provided through the efforts of Presi- 
dent Harris, from subscriptions secured by him from the alumni and 
other friends of the University. 

Nearly all of the larger University buildings are constructed of brick, 
or brick and stone, the. principal exception being the shop building. This 
building is of wood ; standing upon posts. It was poorly constructed 
originally and is now badly out of repair. It is inadequate for the uses 
of the University. A large part of the students are pursuing the courses 
in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering; and the practical instruction 
in these courses is given in this building, the poorest one on the campus. 
It is too small ; cannot be repaired except at large expense ; and, if in com- 
plete repair, would not now meet the needs of the engineering depart- 
ments that use it. It was built when the students were about one-third 
of the present number and has been in constant use many years. Its 
valuable equipments should have the protection of a stone or brick build- 
ing. A new building is needed, of sufficient size to furnish room neces- 
sary for the requirements of these important departments. It should 
contain recitation rooms, drawing rooms, carpenter and iron working 
rooms, a forge shop, foundry, and rooms for dynamos, boilers and 
engines. It would seem to be wise policy on the part of the state to 
furnish as promptly as possible all buildings necessary for carrying on 
advantageously the instruction work of the institution. The last legisla- 
tive appropriation for a new building was made ten years ago. The 
trustees would urge upon the next legislature the great need of a new 
shop building, and ask that an appropriation be made for the construction 
of such a building. If the financial condition of the State does not seem 
to warrant an appropriation of a sum sufficient to complete such a build- 
ing in every part at once, provision might be made for the beginning of 
a plain, substantial brick structure, that would protect the equipments 
and accommodate the students, to be finished in future years. 

The School of Law is winning golden opinions from every quarter 
because of the ability of its instructors and the quality of its work. 

The many friends of this institution have every reason to be extremely 
gratified because of its constant growth and progress and its present 
excellent condition. Its development has been steady and healthy in all 
directions. As compared with a decade ago, it has more and better 
buildings with greatly improved equipments, three times as many stu- 
dents, a faculty twice as large and of acknowledged ability. The courses 
of nstruction have been increased in number, and the general work 
broadened. New departments have been successfully established and the 
institution has much greater financial resources. Its friends have multi- 
plied continually; and in all respects the University of Maine is appar- 
ently prosperous and successful. 

HENRY LORD, 

President of the Board of Trustees.- 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To the Trustees of the University of Maine: 

I have the honor to present my eighth annual report as president of 
the University of Maine, covering the calendar year 1900. 



CHANGES IN THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND THE FACULTY. 

Mr. Arthur Lee Moore. B. S., whose term of office as a trustee expired 
in 1900, did not ask reappointment, as private interests made it incon- 
venient for him to serve. He was a faithful and interested member of 
the Board for fourteen years. His successor, the Hon. A. J. Durgin, is 
a resident of Orono, who has been familiar with the University through- 
out its entire history. When a member of the legislatures of 1893 and 
1897 he bore a large part in important legislation relating to the Uni- 
versity, and was the sponsor of the bill to give the institution its present 
name. 

One of the saddest events in the history of the University is the death 
of Prof. F. L. Harvey. During the Christmas recess of 1899 he was 
called to Iowa by the death of his mother. In order to reach Orono 
before the end of the vacation he made the journey in great haste, depriv- 
ing himself of needed rest. On his return he was so worn out, that he 
was relieved from recitations with the expectation that he would be 
restored in a few days ; but he grew worse and it became necessary to 
provide for his work for the remainder of the year. Fortunately the 
instruction work as then arranged in the Department of Natural History 
was much lighter during the spring term than in the fall. The classes 
were assumed voluntarily by Prof. Munson, Mr. Stover, and Dr. Russell, 
and the investigations for the experiment station were discontinued. 
The President wishes to acknowledge the generous action of the three 
instructors just named. The immediate cause of Prof. Harvey's sickness 
seems an insufficient one, and it is probable that he had been failing in 
mental vigor for some time, and in a conscientious attempt to maintain 
his work, had increased his hours of labor beyond the safety point, so 
that a small additional strain precipitated a collapse. Improvement failed 
to come, and it was soon evident that the mind, once so acute and 
accurate, was no longer clear. During his last weeks progress was rapid 
toward the end, when, in an instant, and under the most pathetic condi- 
tions, life went out. 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Prof. Harvey was a man of broad education. At an early age he 
received the degree of B. S. from the Iowa Agricultural College, where 
he had won unusual distinction as a student and had rendered some ser- 
vice as an instructor. He was for many years a member of the faculty 
of the University of Arkansas. While there his vacations were spent 
very largely in explorations and collecting trips, which yielded the mate- 
rial for numerous scientific papers that made him well known as a care- 
ful, conscientious and brilliant student in the field of botany, and more 
especially in that of entomology. He came to Orono as professor of 
natural history in 1886 and at once took an important place in the scien- 
tific life of the institution. 

Prof. Harvey was an accurate scholar, of retentive memory, and 
unusual power of stating his knowledge in an interesting way. His 
devotion to his work was complete. As an investigator he was patient, 
trustworthy, and prolific. Scientific journals show many products of his 
work. The list of published papers which he was accustomed to include 
in his biennial reports was always an important one. His experiment 
station work has been ranked very high by those best qualified to judge. 
As an instructor he was enthusiastic and sympathetic, and succeeded in 
interesting many in his department, and in arousing the deepest interest 
in a few. He always had one or two students in his laboratory devoting 
themselves especially to the subjects which he taught. As a man he was 
eminently friendly, sincere, and transparent. 

Mr. Perley Walker, B. M. E., for three years instructor in mechanical 
engineering, has withdrawn to pursue graduate study at Cornell Uni- 
versity in naval architecture. He was a successful teacher, and his loss 
is much regretted. 

Allen Rogers, B. S., served very acceptably as instructor in Chemistry 
for the year of Prof. Aubert's absence. 

William Emanuel Walz, LL. B., instructor in law, has been advanced 
to be Professor of Law. 

Gilman Arthur Drew, Ph. D. ? has been appointed Professor of 
Biology to succeed Prof. Harvey. The title has been changed, from 
Professor of Natural History and Entomologist to the Experiment Sta- 
tion, to Professor of Biology and Zoologist to the Experiment Station. 
Prof. Drew was born in Iowa in 1863 ; received the degree of B. S. from 
the University of Iowa in 1890 and that of Ph. D. from Johns Hopkins 
University in 1898. After leaving college, he was teacher of science in 
an academy and in a high school in Iowa. At Johns Hopkins University 
he held successively, a scholarship, a fellowship, and the Bruce Fellow- 
ship, and for the last two years was assistant in zoology. His summers 
have been spent in collecting and investigating among the mountains 
and along the coast of California ; in the West Indies and Bahama 
Islands; at Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y. ; at Beaufort, S. C. ; at Woods 
Hole, Mass. ; and at Harpswell, Me. Prof. Drew has published a num- 
ber of important papers embodying the results of his studies. 

Orlando Faulkland Lewis, Ph. D., has been appointed Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Modern Languages, beginning with September, 1900. He was 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 9 

born in 1873, was fitted for college in the Boston Latin School, and in 
Germany with private tutors. He received the degree of B. A. from 
Tufts College in 1895 with the highest honors of his class. For two years 
he was assistant in modern languages in his alma mater. He obtained 
the degree of M. A. from the same college in 1897. The following year 
was spent in the University of Munich and the last two in the University 
of Pennsylvania, where he held a Harrison Fellowship in Germanics. He 
was granted the degree of Ph. D. in 1900. Dr. Lewis has studied and 
traveled extensively throughout Europe. In addition to other publica- 
tions he has issued a text-book for the use of German classes. 

Louis Siff, B. S., a graduate of Cornell University, and a fellow in 
the University of Nebraska, has been appointed Tutor in Mathematics, 
in place of Mr. Crathorne, who has become instructor in the University 
of Wisconsin. 

Roscoe M. Packard, M. A., who has pursued undergraduate and grad- 
uate courses at Western Reserve University, has been appointed Tutor 
in Mathematics. 

William P. Beck, B. S., a graduate of Dennison University, has been 
appointed Tutor in Physics in place of Herbert G. Dorsey, resigned. 

Clinton Llewellyn Cole, B. C. E., a graduate of the University in the 
class of 1900, has been appointed Tutor in Drawing in the place of 
Harold H. Clark, resigned. 

Mr. Edwin C. Upton, Assistant in Modern Languages, has been pro- 
moted to be Tutor in English and Moaern Languages. 

Mr. Alden B. Owen, B. M. E., class of 1900, has been appointed Tutor 
in Electrical Engineering. 

Miss Geneva R. Hamilton, who received a certificate on completion of 
the course in library economy, in 1895, has been appointed Assistant 
Librarian. 

The following graduates of the University in the class of 1900 have 
been appointed assistants as indicated : 

Charles H. Lombard, B. C. E., Assistant in Civil Engineering. 

Frank H. Mitchell, B. S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

James Arthur Hayes, B. S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Wilfred PL Caswell, B. M. E., Assistant in Physics. 

Philip R. Goodwin, B. C. E., Assistant in Civil Engineering. 

Percy L. Ricker, B. S., Assistant in Biology. 

Clifford D. Holley, B. S., Assistant Chemist in the Experiment Station. 

Perley Spaulding, B. S., a graduate of the University of Vermont in 
the class of 1900, has been appointed Assistant in Horticulture in the 
Experiment Station. 

FACULTY. 

The list of faculty and other officers for the college year ending June, 
1900. includes 55 names ; of these 6 were lecturers in the school of law, 
and gave only a small part of their time to the University; 10 others 
were employed for all or a part of their time in the work of the Experi- 
ment Station. While the list of faculty names is long, it is still true 
that there are many departments in which additional instructors could be 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

appointed with advantage to the work, and there are some in which an 
increase of the force is almost imperative. The list of institutions in 
which the members of the faculty have received the preparation for their 
work indicates the breadth and cosmopolitan character of the body, 
including not only American but foreign universities. The list includes : 
Amherst College ; Baldwin University ; University of Berlin ; Boston Uni- 
versity ; Bowdoin College; University of Chicago; Cornell University; 
Dennison University; Harvard University; University of Heidelberg; 
University of Iowa ; Johns Hopkins University ; University of Leipsic ; 
University of Maine ; Massachusetts Agricultural College ; Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology ; University of Michigan ; Michigan Agricul- 
tural College; University of Munich; University of Nebraska; North- 
western College ; University of Rochester ; Syracuse University ; Tufts 
College ; Wesleyan University ; Western Reserve University ; University 
of Wisconsin ; Yale University. 

It is worth while noting the important increase in the number of the 
faculty in recent years. The list has grown since 1893 from 25 to 55, or, 
omitting the faculty of the School of Law, to 46. The number of officers 
bearing the title of professor in the collegiate departments has increased 
from 13 to 24. This is due to some extent to the introduction of new 
subjects, but more largely to the division of subjects and the strength- 
ening of old lines of work. It has resulted in confining the duties of 
many officers to a narrower range, allowing greater specialization, and 
better results in teaching. In many departments the division of work is 
extremely satisfactory. It is believed, for instance, that the agricultural 
department is so organized as to allow its instructors to devote them- 
selves to special lines of thought and investigation with a completeness 
possible in very few American institutions. 

The increase in the faculty has been made possible, partly by the 
appropriations of the State, but not largely, for the State money has been 
used almost entirely for maintenance expenses, for repairs, improvements 
to buildings, and additions to equipment. The most important sources 
from which we have drawn the support of this development have been 
the increase of eight thousand dollars a year in the national appropria- 
tions, and more important, a large increase in the funds received from 
students. While a very considerable sum of money has been invested in 
the last eight years in the improvement and extension of our buildings, 
it has been the policy to limit this expenditure to necessities, and to appro- 
priate liberally for the employment of teachers and the purchase of 
apparatus. Buildings greatly add to the comfort of an institution, and 
have their proper part in its efficiency, but they are much less important 
than teachers and apparatus. While the University is sorely pressed for 
room it takes great satisfaction in the efficiency of its board of instruc- 
tion and the completeness of the department facilities. 



RETORT OF THE PRESIDENT II 



DEGREES CONFERRED. 

The following is the list of degrees eonf erred at the last commencement. 
Certificates were presented to the following persons upon completing 
the Short Course in Pharmacy : 

William Henry Crowell, New Britain, Ct. 

George Pearson Larrabee, Pride's Corner. 

DcForest Reed Taft, Winchester, N. H. 
The first degree was conferred upon the following persons : 

Lewis Appleton Barker, LL. B., Bangor. 

Harry Woodward Beedle, B. M. E. (in Electricity), South 
Gardiner. 

Alan Lawrence Bird, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Rockland. 

Frank Harvey Bowerman, B. C. E., Victor, N. Y. 

William Joseph Burgess, B. M. E., Calais. 

Agnes Rowena Burnham, B. Ph., Old Town. 

Walter Neal Cargill, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Liberty. 

Wilfred Harold Caswell, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Bridgton. 

Wilkie Collins Clark, B. S., Skowhegan. 

James Edward Closson, B. S. (in Chemistry), Monson, Mass. 

Clinton Llewellyn Cole, B. C. E., Pleasantdale. 

Harold Elijah Cook, LL.B., Vassalboro. 

Harry Ashton Davis, B. M. E., Orono. 

John Frederick Dolan, LL.B., Bangor. 

Henry Frank Drummond, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Bangor. 

Julian Sturdevant Dunn, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Cumberland. 

Herbert Davidson Eaton, B. S. (in Preparatory Medicine), Bangor. 

Paul Frank Foss, LL.B., Weston. 

Hiram Gerrish, LL. B., Brownville. 

Bernard Gibbs, LL.B., Glenburn. 

Philip Ross Goodwin, B. C. E., Randolph. 

Claude Dewing Graton, LL.B., Burlington, Vt. 

Charles Perley Gray, B. S. (in Preparatory Medicine), Old Town. 

George Otis Hamlin, B. M. E., Orono. 

Malcolm Cole Hart, B. C. E., Willimantic. 

Howard Andrew Hatch, B. C. E., Lindenville, O. 

James Arthur Hayes, B. S. (in Chemistry), Randolph. 

Guy Alfred Hersey, B. C. E., Bangor. 

Ernest Emery Hobson, LL. B., Palmer, Mass. 

Clifford Dyer Holley, B. S. (in Chemistry), Farmington. 

Leon Herbert Horner, B S., Springfield, Mass. 

Edward Hutchings, LL. B., Brewer. 

Freeland Jones, LL. B., Bangor. 

William Goidsborough Jones, B. S., Bucksport. 

Thomas Francis Judge. B. M. E. (in Electricity), Biddeford. 

Harry Hewes Leathers, B. M. E., Bangor. 

Charles Hutchinson Lombard, B. C. E., Portland. 

Alexander Love, B. C. E., East Bluehill. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Verdi Ludgate, LL. B., Lubec. 

John Gardner Lurvey, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Portland. 

Matthew McCarthy, LL. B., Bangor. 

Frank McDonald, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Portland. 

John Daniel Mackay, LL. B., Lake Ainslie, Cape Breton. 

Howard Lewis Maddocks, B. C. E., Skowhegan. 

Edwin Jonathan Mann, B. M. E., West Paris. 

Wilbur Louis Merrili, B. M. E. (in Electricity), East Parsonsfield. 

Chester Horace Mills, LL. B., Skowhegan. 

Fred Carleton Mitchell, B. S., West Newfield. 

Frank Henry Mitchell, B. S. (in Chemistry), Charleston. 

George Ferguson Murphy, B. C. E., Alewive. 

Frank Albert Noyes, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Berlin, N. H. 

Alden Bradford Owen, B M. E. (in Electricity), West Pembroke. 

Arthur Southwick Page, B. C. E., Fairfield. 

DeForest Henry Perkins, B. Ph., North Brooksville. 

Harold John Phillips, L.L.. B., Skowhegan. 

Daniel Lara Philoon, B. S. (in Chemistry), Auburn. 

Howard Pierce, LL. B., Blaine. 

Charles Omer Porter, B. C. E., Cumberland Mills. 

Arthur Wellington Price, LL. B., North Waldoboro. 

Percy Leroy Ricker, B. S. (in Preparatory Medicine), Westbrook. 

Charles Alphonso Robbinson, B. Ph., Patten. 

Agnes May Robinson, LL. B., Sherman Station. 

Clarence Herbert Rollins, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Veazie. 

Frank Morris Rollins, B. S. (in Chemistry), Waterville. 

Leo Bernard Russell, B. C. E., Farmington. 

Walter Joseph Sargent, LL. B., Brewer. 

Lewis Harry Schwartz, LL. B., Lawrence, Mass. 

Stanley Sidensparker, B. S., Warren. 

Frank Jackson Small, LL. B., Old Town. 

Clinton Leander Small, B. A., Auburn. 

Edward Henry Smith, B. M. E., East Sullivan. 

Freeman Ames Smith, B. S., Thorndike, Mass. 

Adah Snowdeal, B. A., Augusta. 

James Bissett Stevenson, LL. B., Farmington. 

Grosvenor Wilson Stickney, B. M. E., Clinton, Mass. 

Edward Moore Strange, B. C. E., Calais. 

Howard Clinton Strout, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Orono. 

Edwin Morrel Tate, B. C. E., South Corinth. 

Fred Foy Tate, B. C. E., South Corinth. 

Dana Leo Theriault, LL. B., Caribou. 

Frederick Everett Thompson, LL. B., Bangor. 

Fred Hale Vo:,e, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Milltown, N. B. 

William Henry Waterhouse, LL. B., Old Town. 

Frank Elijah Webster, B. M. E., Patten. 

Benjamin Thomas Weston, B. C. E., Madison. 

Wallace Augustus Weston, B. C. E., Madison. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT IJ 

Joseph Onon Whitcomb, B. Ph., Morrill. 

Dana Scott Williams, LL. B., Lewiston. 
The second degree was conferred upon the following persons, upon 
presentation of satisfactory theses, and proof of professional and scientific 
work extending over a period of not less than three years : 

William Cross Holden, M. E., Lynn, Mass. 

Allen Rogers. M. S., Orono. 

Perley Walker, M. E., North Anson. 

STUDENTS. 

The number of students for the year ending June, 1900, was 365, and 
for the year beginning September, 1900, will be somewhat larger. The 
Freshman class just admitted, numbers at the time of writing 109. It 
represents country districts and cities in the usual proportion, and 
includes students from every county of the State except Franklin, and 
from several other states. It is noteworthy that it contains graduates 
of an unusually large number of preparatory schools. 

A large majority of these students have gained admission by certificate, 
and their work for about half of the fall term shows that a satisfactory 
proportion of the whole number have been well prepared. The grade of 
work demanded from our classes has been raised from year to year, and 
the preparatory schools are maintaining fairly well tne advance in pre- 
paration which we have needed. Improvement is especially noticeable 
in many of the smaller high schools. 

The certificate system is giving good results ; experience has shown 
some defects, but we are correcting them as fast as they become evident. 
It has been difficult to make candidates understand, and in some cases, 
to make schools understand, that the subjects prescribed for entrance 
examinations are not to be regarded a complete course of study, but are 
prescribed either because they are essential, as the foundation for the 
pursuit of the same or closely related subjects in college courses, or 
because they are convenient subjects on which to test the efficiency of the 
whole preparatory course ; or for both reasons. This misunderstanding 
arises with candidates for the scientific and engineering courses. The 
preparatory work for the classical course is made up largely of a few 
subjects, most of which must of necessity run through several years. It 
is therefore easy to test the candidate's whole work by a comparatively 
short examination. On the other hand, courses which prepare for tech- 
nical and scientific college courses include a much larger number of 
studies, many of which vary from school to school, and the examination, 
unless unduly long, can test only a comparatively small part of the whole 
preparatory work. As a result, a candidate by giving his whole atten- 
tion to the subjects assigned for examination, may succeed, under favor- 
able conditions, in passing a college examination, for admission to a 
scientific or technical course, with a preparation, one or even two years 
shorter than that demanded by the classical course. The saving of time 
is, however, at the cost of development. The candidate, if admitted, may 
maintain himself, but he will suffer the disadvantage of a poor prepara- 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

tion, and runs the risk of fixing the habit of poor work, or at least, less 
than his best. This is all the more true because the minimum demands 
made by technical and scientific courses upon the student, after admis- 
sion, are more rigorous than those made upon the classical student. The 
candidate for admission to a four years' course in the University needs 
a full four years' course of preparation in the high school. 

During the present year there has been added to the regulations gov- 
erning the use of certificates one forbidding the admission by certificate 
of non-graduates of any school, except in unusual cases, in which the 
circumstances must be stated, and the candidate expressly recommended 
for admission, by the principal of the school in which he prepared. 

During the year, the University has begun, in a systematic way, the 
visitation of approved schools. It has always been the purpose of the 
University to make such visits, but the purpose has not been fully carried 
out. 

The proper committees of the faculty have now under consideration the 
classification of approved schools into groups so as to make clear for 
which course in college each school prepares, and which school courses 
furnish a satisfactory preparation. 

The ideal relation between the public high schools and the University 
would make every four years' high school course a preparation for at 
least one college course. In planning our entrance requirements and our 
courses of study the University has kept this in mind as an ideal. It is 
believed that this end can be accomplished without disadvantage to the 
high school students who discontinue their course before entering col- 
lege. The condition for admission to college is this : — the successful com- 
pletion of a four years' high school course, in which shall be included 
certain studies, varying according to the college course contemplated. 
Our scientific course prescribes the smallest list, namely, — English; one 
other language, pursued for at least one year; two natural sciences; 
algebra and plane geometry. Surely, these studies ought to be a part of 
the training of every high school graduate, and as they take less than 
one-third of the time allotted to a full high school course, they leave 
ample opportunity for other studies which teachers or pupils may think 
necessary. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Since my last report no new courses of study have been added to those 
already in existence, but some important modifications and improvements 
have been made. The University offers instruction in the following 
courses : 

College of Arts and Sciences. 

The Classical Course. 

The Latin-Scientific Course. 

The Scientific Course. 

The Chemical Course. 

The Preparatory Medical Course. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 15 

College of Agriculture. 

The Agricultural Course. 
The Special Courses in General Agriculture. 
The Special Course in Horticulture. 
The Special Course in Dairying. 
The Agricultural Experiment Station. 
College of Engineering. 

The Civil Engineering Course. 
The Mechanical Engineering Course. 
The Electrical Engineering Course. 
College of Pharmacy. 

The Pharmacy Course. 
The Short Course in Pharmacy. 
School of Law. 
During the year the course in Spanish has been developed. For a num- 
ber of years, courses in Spanish and Italian have been offered on alternate 
years as elective studies for students in the classical, Latin-scientific, and 
scientific courses. Recent events have greatly increased the importance 
of Spanish, especially for students in engineering courses. The faculty 
have, therefore, increased the opportunity for the election of Spanish, and 
it is hoped that it may be possible soon to put instruction in this lan- 
guage on the same plane with French and German. 

French and German elective courses for Juniors and Seniors have been 
opened to students in the engineering courses. The work in the depart- 
ment of biology has been materially extended. The course in chemistry 
is enriched by the introduction of industrial chemistry. 

Under the efficient guidance of Prof. Huddilston, there has been organ- 
ized an Art Guild, having as its objects the study of art and the collec- 
tion of photographs and casts of the masterpieces of the great artists. 
This effort has met with remarkable success, and there is reason to 
believe that it will prove an important influence in the University. 

SCHOOL OF LAW. 

The school of law has passed the experimental stage and has proved 
itself competent to do thoroughly good work. Its graduates have main- 
tained its reputation in their examinations at the Bar, and the faculty 
are establishing an enviable reputation among other schools. Two of the 
professors have received offers of positions in other states, but have 
preferred to remain with us. Without establishing excessive require- 
ments, the school has made no concessions from its original determination 
to do the best work on the highest grade. The faculty of the school now 
consists of 

xA.bram Winegardner Harris, LL. D., President of the University, 
George Enos Gardner, M. A., Dean and Professor of Law, 
Allen Ellington Rogers, M. A., Professor of Constitutional Law, 
William Emanuel Walz, M. A., LL. B., Professor of Law, 
Arthur Wellington Price, B. A., LL. B., Instructor in Law, 
Charles Hamlin, M. A., Lecturer on Bankruptcy, 



l6 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Lucilius Alonzo Emery, M. A., LL. D., Lecturer on Roman Law, 
Andrew Peters Wiswell, B. A., Lecturer on Evidence. 
Louis Carver Southard, M. S., Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence, 
Forest John Martin, LL. B., Lecturer on Common Law Pleading and 

Maine Practice, 
Hugo Clark, C. E., Lecturer on Equity Pleading, 
Ralph Kneeland Jones, B. S., Librarian. 
For the year ending in June the number of students was forty-two. 

For the current year the number is slightly decreased by the change of 

the course from two years to three. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The annual expenditure for departmental equipment, exclusive of 
books, is always a very considerable sum. During the last year this item 
was larger than usual. The heating plant has been repaired at an expense 
of about $3,000. We have a satisfactory system for carrying steam from 
the light station to four large buildings, Oak Hall, Wingate Hall, Coburn 
Hall, and the new drill hall. We are, however, without a central heating 
plant, and the steam is taken from the boiler connected with the lighting 
plant, which is not of sufficient capacity. The equipment for the course 
in electrical engineering has been increased by an expenditure of $2,398.42. 
This was made necessary by the increased number of students entering 
this course. Still further large expenditures will be needed. The depart- 
ment of astronomy has been equipped with an eight-inch telescope made 
by Alvan Clark & Sons. 

The department of biology has expended nearly one thousand dollars 
for microscopes, and other apparatus. The department of veterinary 
science has expended about five hundred dollars for the same purpose. 

LIBRARY. 

The library now contains 19,650 volumes. Perhaps no part of our 
equipment is so insufficient. With the increasing amount of investigation 
carried on, the improvement in methods of instruction, and the growth 
in the number of students, the demands upon the library have increased 
much more rapidly than the means for satisfying them. It is to be 
hoped that in the near future we may be able to make a material increase 
in the annual appropriation for the purchase of books. 

BUILDINGS. 

The University buildings are in good condition. Repairs have been 
made during the year, when needed, but owing to the fact that repairs 
have been well maintained the expenditure for this purpose was slightly 
less than usual. 

The Dairy building has been repaired at an expenditure of about five 
hundred dollars. For the use of the department of astronomy a frame 
observatory building has been constructed, containing a dome, twelve 
feel in diameter, for the large telescope, and an adjoining room for the 
azimuth and altitude instrument. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT IJ 

The most important addition to the buildings is the erection of a drill 
hall. This is a building which the University has greatly needed for 
many years, and the recent shortening of the winter vacation and length- 
ening of the summer vacation, a change which was forced upon us by 
the interest of the student body, has practically cut off the time which in 
this climate was available for out door drill. As military drill is required 
by both national government and state, some provision for indoor drill 
was imperative. 

No less important was the need of a gymnasium. The combined 
influence of the climate and the class demands upon the student's time 
lead a very large number to a neglect of proper exercise during the win- 
ter months. The need of a drill hall and gymnasium was several times 
presented to the legislature, but without success. The last legislature 
referred it to the coming legislature. The need of such a building was 
so great and the chance of obtaining it from the legislature so little, that, 
with the approval of your board, I appealed to the alumni and other 
friends of the University for funds with which to build it. It is prob- 
able that on the completion of the building we shall have in hand about 
one-half the total cost. The remainder will come slowly and with some 
difficulty, but I am confident that it will not be necessary to ask the State 
for an appropriation to complete this building. 

It was originally designed to cost not more than $20,000, but changes 
in the original plans have increased this sum. These changes include the 
substitution of brick for wood in parts of the building, the substitution 
of granite for brick in other parts, the raising of the basement story of 
the whole building about three feet ; improvements in the room to be 
used as a chapel ; the substitution of slate roofing for shingles, and of 
steel trusses for wood in the drill room ; the finishing of the whole base- 
ment instead of a part only. The building contains a gymnasium and 
drill room 60x106; a general assembly room 38x114; recitation rooms; 
offices ; store rooms ; rooms for the athletic teams ; bathrooms ; bowling 
alley ; ball cage ; etc. ; and will furnish unexcelled facilities for military 
drill and physical training. 

NEEDS OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

The needs of an institution of this kind are always numerous, and I 
regard it as unnecessary to mention any except the most prominent and 
most pressing. The heating plant must be extended. I do not see how 
this work can be postponed. The boilers now in use in one building, the 
greenhouse, may not last out the present winter, and cannot be used 
another winter. Two buildings, Oak Hall and Fernald Hall, are now 
entirely dependent for heat upon the boiler in the light station, and the 
new drill hall will have no other source of heat. This boiler is not large 
enough to meet the demand, and as it is the only one, any breakdown 
would leave us without the means of heating these buildings. The over- 
loading of this boiler is especially dangerous as we depend upon it, not 
only for heat, but for power in the shop, and both water and light for 
the whole university. It is imperative that a second boiler be purchased 



l8 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

and set up. It is, however" to be hoped that when this is done, it may 
be possible to begin the construction of a new shop building and power 
and heat plant. As these must be in a new location, and cannot be long 
delayed, it would be extremely unfortunate to expend any more money 
on the present location. 

Another pressing demand is for improved methods of ventilation, in the 
recitation rooms in Coburn Hall, and in Fernald Hall. For the work that 
we do, our buildings are few and small and recitation rooms and labora- 
tories must be used for the maximum number of persons and the maxi- 
mum number of hours. This can be done safely when ventilation is 
satisfactory, but knowing as we do how serious to health is the menace 
of bad ventilation, I am sure that if the present conditions could be appre- 
ciated the State would not hesitate to make the provision to remedy our 
present difficulties. 

One most important need is a new shop building to include offices, 
recitation rooms, drawing rooms, and stock rooms, a foundry, forge shop, 
carpenter shop, iron working room, repair room, dynamo room, engine 
room, boiler room, and coal storage. The utility and necessity of such 
a building need no proof. The insufficiency of the present building is 
evident on inspection. It is an old building; it is a frame building; its 
foundations are posts ; it is cold and full of drafts ; it is unplastered and 
unfinished ; it has been built piecemeal, with no possible regard to archi- 
tectural effect, because it was absolutely necessary to obtain the largest 
space for the smallest expenditure; it is liable to fire; it is too small; it 
must have expensive repairs if it is to be used much longer. In this 
building is placed valuable machinery, which has cost the State a large 
sum of money. The erection of a new building would accomplish 
important economies in the production of heat, light and power, in the 
item of repairs, in the maintenance of the plant, and in the efficiency of 
instruction. It need not be expensive. A large part would be of heavy 
but simple construction, one story in height, with large glass surface. 
Unless the conditions of the State treasury absolutely prohibit any such 
appropriation, every effort should be made to obtain an appropriation for 
such a building or for a part of it. 

A satisfactory building with central heating plant and equipment could 
be built for $50,000. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. W. HARRIS, President. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 



To the Trustees of the University of Maine : 

The Treasurer has the honor to submit the following report concern- 
ing the financial condition of the University, June 30, 1900. 

RECEIPTS OF THE UNIVERSITY FROM JULY 1, 1899, TO JUNE 30, 1900. 



Cash balance July 1, 1899 




$12,760 04 




$5,915 00 

4,000 00 

25,000 00 

30,000 00 

1,162 22 

700 24 

344 36 

22 34 

265 57 

218 24 

20 00 

175 07 

507 11 

12 00 

197 88 

149 73 

2,400 00 

182 66 

8,458 14 

8,463 76 












The State 












Interest 








Shop. 








Prizes 

Personal Collections (A. & L.) 




Commons (old hills) 




Suspense 




Error Account 




Athletic Association 




School of Law 




Sundry Small Receipts 




Tuition 




Student Receipts 


88,194 32 










$100,954J36 



NET EXPENSES OF THE UNIVERSITY FROM JULY 1, 1899, TO JUNE 30, 1900. 



Current Expenses : 

Salaries 

Departments: 

Agriculture 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Natural History 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

Modern Languages 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Military Science 

School of Law 

Library 

Latin 

Reading Room 

Greek 



$1 



465 02 
579 67 
103 08 

26 35 
430 53 
422 04 
196 74 

11 65 

9 05 

1 50 

314 51 

736 32 

127 30 

109 01 

4 09 



$43,127 49 



10,536 86 
$53,664 35 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



NET EXPENSES OF THE UNIVERSITY-CONCLUDED. 



General Expenses: 

Advertising 

Care of grounds 

Improvement of grounds 

Office 

Commencement 

Miscellaneous 

Postage and Stationery . , 
Furniture and Fixtures . . 

Water 

Oak Hall 

Freight and Express. . . . 

Mt. Vernon House 

Heating buildings 

Light 

Treasury 

Incidentals 

Care of buildings 

Sundries 

Insurance 

LightStation 



General Repairs 

Prizes 

Text Books 



Cost of Maintaining the University for the Year 



Observatory .. 

Drill Hall 

Track 

Heating Plant 



Cash Balance June 30, 190<> 



$414 89 
485 72 
651 94 
396 04 
450 16 

1,408 00 
438 17 
52-2 64 

2,971 15 
218 02 
716 55 
367 8! 

3,478 7' 
611 91 
100 74 
118 16 
881 45 
25 30 
87 10 

1,483 01 



$15,828 59 

4,206 11 

80 00 

361 80 

$74,140 85 

$289 04 
,S90 28 
393 25 

2,686 28 

$78,399 70 
22,554 66 



$100,954 36 



ACCOUNT WITH THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT APPROPRIATION 
UNDER THE MORRILL ACT, FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



Receipts. 
Received from the United States, July 13, 1900 

Expenditures. 



Department of Agriculture 

Mechanic Arts 

English Language 

Mathematical Science. 

Natural or Physical Science. 
Economic Science 



$6,750 00 
8,600 00 
2,100 00 
3,200 00 
2,550 00 
1,800 00 



$25,000 00 



$25,000 00 



Respectfully submitted, 

ISAIAH K. STETSON, Treasurer. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of the Treasurer, and find 
them correctly kept and properly vouched. 

ELLIOTT WOOD, Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW- 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir: — I beg leave to submit the following report regarding the School 
of Law for the years 1899- 1900. 

The total registered attendance during the school year 1899-1900 was 
forty-two. Of this number, twenty-five were members of the senior 
class, sixteen were members of the junior class, and one was a special 
student. The degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred at the last 
Commencement upon twenty-six students, one of these being a man who 
had nearly finished the work of the senior year in 1897-1898, and who 
made up the deficiency in the spring of 1900. The young men composing 
this class made up an exceptionally able body of students ; all, with a 
single exception, have already been admitted to the Bar, and with high 
honor ; and they seemed reasonably sure to do credit to themselves and to 
the University in their professional careers. 

The total registration for 1900-1901, to date, is thirty-nine. The slight 
decrease in attendance may be attributed to the change in the law by 
which three years are required to be spent in study before admission to 
the bar. Many students feel that they cannot afford the expense of a 
course of this length. I think, however, that the appointment of the State 
Board of Bar Examiners will eventually tend to increase greatly the 
attendance at the School ; as the character of the examinations which the 
Board is likely to give, if it follows in the footsteps of similar Boards 
elsewhere, will be such as to make attendance at a law school almost a 
necessity. I am of the opinion that in a few years the normal attendance 
at the school will be seventy-five, and that a steady, though moderate 
growth, may be anticipated thereafter. 

The students for the present year are classified as follows: seniors, 7; 
juniors, 9: first year, 20; post graduate, 1. The first year class is one 
of particular promise, all the men being apparently bright, and possessing 
in every case a good high school or college education. Colby, Bates, and 
Harvard colleges are represented by graduates, and a number of men 
have had partial courses in those institutions and in the University of 
Maine. Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New York, and Minnesota are 
the states represented ; and there is one student from Nova Scotia. The 
counties are thus represented : Androscoggin, 1 ; Aroostook, 2 ; Cumber- 
land, 1; Franklin, 1; Kennebec, 2; Lincoln, 2; Penobscot, 16; Somerset, 
2; Washington, 5. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Mr. Arthur W. Price, a member of the class of 1900, has been engaged 
as an instructor. 

On August 28, 1900, at the invitation of the American Bar Association, 
a meeting of representatives from some twenty-five law schools was held 
for the purpose of forming an association of American Law Schools. 
This school was represented at the meeting. An organization was 
effected and articles of association adopted. The purpose of the associa- 
tion is the advancement of the cause of legal education by the advocacy 
of higher standards and by emphasis upon the need of more thorough 
and adequate instruction. The Association promises to have a large 
influence. By a slight change in our requirements for admission this 
school will be eligible for membership. I recommend that the Dean of 
the school be given authority to sign the "Articles of Association" above 
referred to, thus making ihe school a member of the Association. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. GARDNER, 

Dean of the School of Law. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir: — Since making my last report a few changes have been made in 
the course in English, the chief being the introduction of a year's work 
in the study of fiction. This course, though somewhat experimental at 
present, promises to be popular. Some change has been made in the 
work in themes and oratory, by which the seniors are relieved of decla- 
mations throughout the year, and of themes during the second term. 

The work in English is, I think, better done than ever before. A 
broader and more serious view is taken of the study of our mother 
tongue, a condition which promises well for the future. 

The English department feels keenly two pressing wants, — a larger 
equipment of books for the historical study of English literature, and 
better provision for the study and practice of oratory. The first of these 
wants can be met by the outlay of a few hundred dollars. We need 
especially a larger number of standard editions of the English classics. 
We need too the Historical English Dictionary now in course of publica- 
tion. To obtain this work a special appropriation will be necessary, as 
the usual sum set apart for the purchase of works on English philology 
would be inadequate. 

Our second want is an instructor in oratory. Systematic instruction in 
elocution should be given, not to train men to become stage reciters, but 
to prepare them to acquit themselves well wherever they may be called 
upon to address the public. A very necessary part of their training is 
practice in debating. Of course something is done along that line now, 
all that can be done under present conditions ; but the work needs to be 
greatly extended. I am glad to be able to say in this connection that the 
students themselves, recognizing their needs, have for some time 
maintained a vigorous debating society, which is, I believe, giving one 
of the best "elective" courses in the University. But to secure most 
satisfactory results, the debates should take place in the presence of a 
competent critic, and the student should receive credit for his work ; 
which is not the case at present. In other words, the work of the debat- 
ing society should become a recognized part of the college course. 

In closing I would call your attention to the fact that the appointment 
of a special instructor in oratory would not only strengthen the English 
department in that direction, but would afford time to develop the courses 
in English literature, offer advanced courses in rhetoric, in criticism, and 
in the historical development of the language. All these courses, though 
much needed, must wait for favorable conditions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. M. ESTABROOKE, 

Professor of English. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir: — The number of students in the entering class in Latin is about 
the same as last year ; but it includes more that are by preparation and 
purpose likely to continue the study of Latin further on in their course. 
This fact is. very encouraging. For the present year the number of 
students in elective classes in Latin is, of course, yet very small. The 
course in the Roman Elegiac Poets is being given for the first time. 

The recent vote of the trustees to co-operate with the American School 
in Rome opens the courses of instruction in that institution, free of tui- 
tion, to graduates of this University. 

About ninet}' lantern slides illustrating Roman art and architecture, as 
well as antiquities, have been imported since my last report, and work 
has been commenced upon the preparation of others from negatives 
loaned by Professor Merrill, of Wesleyan University. 

Professor Kelsey, of the University of Michigan, has recently presented 
the department with a number of ''squeezes" for the study of Roman 
inscriptions, and some illustrations of Roman art and architecture. 

It would be a great convenience in using the lantern pictures in the 
possession of the department, if a suitable electric lantern were on hand, 
which could be set up with little delay, and used much more often than 
is convenient with the present apparatus. Such a lantern would be avail- 
able for other departments often, and for more public lectures ; and, since 
we have our own power, would cost little to run, after it were acquired. 

Respectfully submitted, 

KARL P. HARRINGTON, 

Professor of Latin, 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir : — This department is now entering upon its second year. Only the 
work of the Freshman year is required. In addition to this, there was 
one elective class of eight students during the first year, and three elec- 
tive courses are being taken the current year, besides the course in Italian 
Art. The success of the Department of Greek seems assured, and justi- 
fies the board of trustees in adding it to the college work. 

I am convinced that it would be desirable to offer instruction in prepar- 
atory Greek, so that a student who so wishes might begin the study of 
Greek after coming to the University. Greek is a subject which many of 
the schools in the State cannot well offer ; and to relieve them of the 
necessity of providing instruction in Greek would not only be of advan- 
tage to the schools, but it would eventually prove a boon to the cause of 
classics in the State. We can cover in a year and a half the Greek 
required for entrance and there would still be two years and a half left 
for college Greek, only one year of which is required. By taking this 
step we should in no sense be lowering the standards of classical educa- 
tion, but should rather be shifting the traditional two or three years' work 
of the schools to a point where more men and women conld take advan- 
tage of Greek instruction. To offer instruction in beginning Greek to 
college students means merely that more students will take Greek under 
specialists. 

Beginning Greek, with the language of the New Testament as a basis, 
is now offered in the University. For the present this course may be 
used as a substitute for the classical preparatory work of the first year, 
and students desiring to enter the classical course may make up the other 
requirements by outside instruction ; but eventually the wisdom of includ- 
ing the preparatory Greek, which is done in a number of our best col- 
leges, will, I trust, commend itself to you and the faculty. 
. Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. HUDDILSTON, 

Professor of Greek. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MODERN 
LANGUAGES 



President A. IV. Harris: 

Sir : — The required, and the elective courses in French and German 
render it now possible for students in the Classical, Latin Scientific and 
Scientific Courses to obtain four years' instruction in either language. 
All students may obtain four years' instruction in these languages, divided 
in the ratio of three years of one language and one of the other, or two 
years of each. 

The department will offer in this year's catalogue five full year courses 
in German, five full year courses in French, and one full year course in 
Spanish. It is unfortunate that, at present, Spanish cannot be made a 
two year course. On alternate years there is given a full year course in 
Italian. 

The teaching force of the department consists of Mr. Goodell, Mr. 
Upton and myself, giving an aggregate of thirty-four hours of instruction 
per week, divided as follows : first year German, three divisions, four 
hours per week, 101 students ; second year German, three divisions, two 
hours per week, 83 students ; second year German, for students entering 
on German, four hours per week, 6 students ; third year German, five 
hours per fortnight, 9 students. Reading of scientific German is being 
done by several students, as one of the requirements for the degree of 
M. S. 

In French, owing to changes for this year in the entrance requirements 
in the regular college curriculum, there are this year no beginning classes, 
against 167 students in 1899. Two courses in second year French are 
offered ; the regular full year course, two hours per week, 25 students ; 
the other, a second year full course, five hours per fortnight, for those 
having offered French at entrance, and having taken already two hours 
of college French, 11 students. A course in French Literature, five hours 
per fortnight, is also given to 4 students, the period covered being that 
of the French Revolution. 

A new course in advanced German has been added, making possible a 
more extended study of Faust than has been given heretofore, and, in 
the spring term, a study of the principal epochs in the History of German 
Literature. In connection with this course, the recently acquired com- 
plete collection of the Deutsche National Litteratur, 226 volumes, edited 
by Kiirschner, and now in the modern language alcove of the library, will 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 2J 

be of invaluable assistance ; the acquisition of complete sets of the more 
prominent German philological journals would, however, greatly increase 
the possibilities of advanced work in the department. 

A small number of valuable reference books in French and Spanish 
have recently been added to the modern language alcove, among which 
are: Petit de Julleville, Histoire de la Litterature Franchise, 8 volumes; 
10 volumes of the Rivadeneyra Collection of Spanish Authors; and the 
new Larousse Dictionary, 7 volumes. 

The course in Elementary Spanish, five hours per fortnight, is given 
this year to fifteen students. German is taught twenty-two hours per 
week, being given by Air. Upton and myself; French is taught ten hours 
per week, being carried entirely by Mr. Goodell, who also conducts the 
work in Spanish. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ORLANDO F. LEWIS, 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 



President A. IV. Harris: 

Sir : — Within the past two years a very considerable increase has been 
made in the subjects included in the Department of Philosophy. 

My personal teaching in the department, at the date of the last biennial 
report, embraced only General Psychology and Logic. Since then, instruc- 
tion in Psychology has been so extended as to include Comparative Psy- 
chology and an advanced course .in General Psychology, in which obscure, 
abnormal, or the more unusual mental phenomena receive consideration. 

In addition, a course in Pedagogy has been established, embodying an 
application of the principles of Psychology to the art of teaching. 
Instruction in the Philosophy of History and in the History of Philosophy 
is also included in the work of this department. 

Recognizing the value of all these courses as contributing to liberal 
culture in a very essential way, I desire to call more specific attention to 
two of them that impress me as possessing peculiar interest and value to 
students at the present period of development of philosophical investiga- 
tion and study. I refer to Comparative Psychology and Pedagogy: the 
former on account of the light reflected from the study of other minds 
than ours upon our own mental processes, and the latter on account of its 
practical applications of all that we knew of the laws of mind, both in 
their earlier and later manifestations. 

After a course in General Psychology, the student is prepared to take 
up with advantage the study of the mental phenomena of animals, and, 
through points of difference, resemblance, or analogy, to comprehend 
more completely the wonderfully complex phenomena of his own intel- 
lectual and emotional life 

After the course in General Psychology, the student is prepared, also, 
to comprehend and apply the psychic principles which must underlie or 
furnish the basis of all successful teaching. These principles find their 
application in a helpful way, not only in the practice of the art of teach- 
ing, but also in our every day experiences, and in all the relations of life. 

Were I to direct immediate thought to any other subject in this depart- 
ment, it would be to the advanced course in Psychology, in which our 
more unusual mental states receive specific attention and discussion. 

I desire to state that in all the classes which it has been my pleasure to 
teach in the past two years the interest on the part of the students has 
been most gratifying and their advancement of an entirely satisfactory 
character. 

I\i sped fully submitted, 

M. C. FERNALD, 

Professor of Philosophy. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL 
ECONOMY AND HISTORY 



.President A. IV. Harris: 

Sir : — The work in my department is essentially the same as when I 
made my last report. The transfer of Logic and History of Philosophy 
to Dr. Fernald has enabled me to devote my time and energies more fully 
to the proper work of my department. The classes under my instruction 
have shown commendable interest and have made good progress. 

The addition to the library of many valuable works on history and 
political economy has been of the greatest advantage to the students, as 
well as to myself, since books of reference are in these lines what the^ 
laboratory is in the study of the experimental sciences. 

The honor courses offered in this department are "Economic History," 
"Constitutional History,*' and "Roman Law;" the last two being espec- 
ially recommended to those students who intend to enter the law as a 
profession. 

In addition to my college duties. I give instruction" in the School of 
Law, on Constitutional Law and Legal History. In these branches, the 
Jaw students have done as well as could be reasonably expected during the 
-necessarily brief time allotted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. E. ROGERS, 

Professor of Political Economy and History. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 
AND ASTRONOMY 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir: — No changes of importance have been made in the courses of 
instruction offered in this department since my last report. 

Dr. Fernald, who for several years taught two classes in mathematics,, 
is now giving all his time to the department of philosophy. Mr. A. B. 
Crathorne, tutor in mathematics, resigned at the close of the last college 
year. These changes, together with the increase of work resulting from 
the addition to our astronomical equipment, rendered necessary the 
appointment of two tutors in mathematics, instead of one. These are 
Mr. Louis Siff, a graduate of Cornell University, who was last year a 
teaching fellow in the University of Nebraska, and Mr. Roscoe M. 
Packard, M. A., Western Reserve University. 

A notable addition to the facilities for instruction in astronomy has 
been made by the building of an observatory and the purchase, from 
Alvan Clark & Sons, Cambridgeport, Mass., of an eight-inch refracting 
telescope, equatorially mounted and completely equipped. Besides the 
equatorial, the observatory now contains the Repsold vertical circle, a 
very good instrument purchased in 1875, two sextants, two artificial hori- 
zons and a siderial chronometer. 

An additional pier has been provided, upon which a zenith telescope 
may be mounted when we are able to buy it. To render the equipment 
of the observatory quite complete for present purposes, there should be 
added a chronograph and an astronomical clock. 

In May, 1900, I was granted leave of absence to observe the total eclipse 
of the sun. After spending a day at the U. S. Naval Observatory at 
Washington, D. C, I went to Barnesville, Ga., to take part in the work 
of the Naval Observatory party stationed there. I also visited their 
station at Griffin, Ga., and the Lick Observatory station at Thomaston, Ga. 
Respectfully submitted, 

J. N. HART, 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy^ 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir : — During the two years covered by this report instruction has been 
given in the usual required courses, and in elective courses as follows : 

During 1899-1900, Mathematical Physics, two students; Preston's Light, 
seven students ; three laboratory courses, in general physics, optics, and 
electricity, thirty-three students ; — total for the year, forty-two students. 

During 1900-1901, fall term: Meteorology, four students; two labora- 
tory courses, thirty-two students ; — total for the half year, thirty-six 
students. Of these students, three in the first year, and four in the 
second, were honor course students. 

During this period Mr. Dorsey and Mr. Beck have been employed as 
tutors ; Mr. Sidensparker and Mr. Caswell, as assistants. The work of 
these gentlemen has been highly creditable. 

Appropriations from the library fund have enabled me to add a number 
of useful books to the department library. The arrangement whereby 
the department keeps its books in its own rooms has proved convenient, 
and has led to a great increase in the use of reference books by students. 
While we are well equipped with current periodicals, we are in need of 
complete sets of physical periodicals, and I recommend an appropriation 
from the library fund for the purchase of a set of the Philosophical 
Magazine. 

The provision made for the department of mathematics and astronomy 
in the new building will relieve the crowded condition in this department 
by giving it two additional rooms, a large room for advanced laboratory 
work, and a smaller one for a private laboratory. 

Since the last report the following pieces of apparatus have been added 
to the equipment ; a Societe Genevoise dividing engine, a Kelvin balance, 
a testing set, quadrant electrometer, dropped-fork apparatus for determin- 
ing g, interference tubes, apparatus for capacity work, and sundry pieces 
of less value. For the course in meteorology new apparatus has been 
bought to make with that already on hand a fairly extensive equipment 
for this work. 

One of the needs of the department is apparatus, which must be 
increased constantly to keep a physical laboratory from falling behind the 
times. Of this fact the University has always made liberal recognition. 
The large number of elective students in the department emphasizes a 
new need which I trust may be supplied as soon as possible. So much of 
the time of the head of the department is occupied with the required 



2,2 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

courses that it is impossible to give a just share of attention to the 
advanced work. Moreover a course should be added in the mathematical 
theory of electricity, and the course already offered in laboratory research 
should be extended. These results could be accomplished if the tutor 
could take the Sophomore courses and some of his work could in turn 
fall to the assistant. This would require the appointment of an instructor 
and tutor instead of a tutor and assistant. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TAMES S. STEVENS, 

Professor of Physics. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir : — The work of the chemical department during the past two years 
has been carried on with such changes as were deemed necessary to 
increase its usefulness and to offer a somewhat greater range of subjects. 

The new courses introduced for this purpose are : Ch 23, an advanced 
course in organic chemistry ; Ch 24, a course in technical chemistry • 
Ch 25. a course in technical analysis ; Ch 26, a course in physical chem- 
ical methods ; Ch 27, a course in laboratory physiological chemistry ; 
Ch 10, Chemical Readings, has been replaced by a course in the methods 
of analytical chemistry (recitations). The course in technical chemistry 
will be inaugurated in the spring term. Tt will consist of lectures upon 
the leading chemical industries, with especial attention to those which are 
already established, or might profitably be established, in this State. 
The lectures will be supplemented by recitations. 

With the help of my assistant, Mr. Hayes, I am preparing a number of 
lantern slides for illustration. 

I take pleasure in stating that many manufacturers and importers have 
kindly donated valuable specimens of raw and finished products. 
Acknowledgment is made of the generosity of the following firms: Pick- 
hardt & Kuttroff, Heller & Merz, A. Klipstein & Co., aniline dyes and 
chemicals ; the F. W. Devoe and C T. Raynolds Co., a very extensive set 
of pigments ; Laflinand Rand Powder Co., explosives ; H. J. Hanssen, 
specimens illustrating the silk industry ; J. F. Hanssen, raw wools ; The 
German Kali Works, potash salts; The New Jersey Zinc Co., zinc, white 
and spelter; Berry Brothers, resins and varnishes; John A. Casey & Co., 
rosin oils; The Armour Glue Co.. gelatine and glues; A. W. Smith, 
limited, oil soluble anilines. Many other additions may be expected 
before the opening of the course. 

In connection with the lectures on the textile industries, an elementary 
laboratory course in dyeing will be carried on, which, it is hoped, may 
be expanded into one still more complete, consisting of advanced work in 
dyeing, calico printing and the analysis and examination of technical 
products. 

During the year 1898 and 1899 I was assisted in the work of the depart- 
ment by Assistant Professor G. Ryland and Mr. Allen Rogers. During 
my leave of absence, the work oi the department was carried on very 
successfully by Prof. Ryland and Mr. Allen Rogers, assisted by Mr. C 
L. Small and Mr. C. W. Crockett, both graduates in tne class of 1899. 



34 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



I am happy to testify to the ^thoroughness and ability with which they 
discharge their duties. 

At the Commencement in June, 1899, the degree of B. S. was granted 
to: 

C. W. Crockett, thesis on: "Solubility of the amylsulphates of 
calcium and strontium." 

C. L. Small, thesis on : "The Constitution of the tritingstate of 
chromium." 

D. L. Cleaves, thesis on: "The preparation and properties of 
paraethoxymetatoluene and paraethoxymetatoluene sulphonic 
acid." 

At the Commencement in June, 1900, the degree of B. S. was granted 
to: 

J. E. Closson, thesis on: "The Kallitype process." 
J. A. Hayes, thesis on : "A volumetric process for the determina- 
tion of magnesia." 

C. D. Holley, thesis on : "Liquid mixtures of constant boiling 
point." 

F. H. Mitchell, thesis on : "An investigation of the action of 
stannous chloride upon amnionic molybdate." 

D. L. Philoon, thesis on : "Examination of some electrolytic 
methods." 

F. M. Rollins, thesis on : "Qualitive tests and analysis of organic 
substances." 
The degree of M. S. in chemistry was conferred upon Mr. Allen Rogers 
(B. S. 1897), thesis on: "The preparation and properties of the blue 
oxide of molybdenum." 

Messrs. Hayes and Mitchell were retained as assistants and are per- 
forming their duties in a very satisfactory manner. Mr. C. D. Holley 
is assistant chemist in the Experiment Station. 

During the past year the cabinet was increased largely, about one hun- 
dred specimens being a donation from the Mallinckrodt Chemical Com- 
pany, who generously furnished a cabinet for the same. 

Twelve large photographs of distinguished chemists have been placed 
upon the walls of Fernald Hall and a number of valuable books have been 
added to the library. 

The department needs include apparatus, charts, and diagrams, chiefly 
for illustration of the new course in technical chemistry. Many valuable 
treatises have been published lately, some of which have not yet found 
their way into our library. For research work nothing is more necessary 
than complete sets of periodicals, and I very earnestly beg that a set of 
The Journal of the London Chemical Society be purchased for the depart- 
ment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. B. AUBERT, 
Professor of Chemistry. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL 
CHEMISTRY 



President A. W . Harris: 

Sir: — The Department of Biological Chemistry owes its existence to 
the expansion of the courses in agricultural chemistry, and is maintained 
primarily for students in agriculture. From the first, however, biological 
chemistry has been made a part of the preparatory medical and the two 
pharmacy courses, and all four courses are usually represented in the 
classes. 

Biological chemistry naturally falls into two divisions: the chemistry 
of the plant, and that of the animal. While the two branches are not 
kept wholly distinct, the greater part of the work of the fall term in these 
courses is devoted to the chemistry of plant life ; in the spring term atten- 
tion is given to the more complex chemistry of the animal body. The 
consideration of animal foods, a subject to which especial attention is 
.given, necessitates a return to the plant, the work of the fall term being 
extended along these lines. 

Text-books are used in both courses, supplemented at times by lectures. 
Under the present arrangement of studies it is impossible to apply fully 
the laboratory system, and demonstrations are substituted. The depart- 
ment has now at its command a stock of chemical reagents and an increas- 
ing amount of illustrative material. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. MERRILL, 
Professor of Biological Chemistry. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir : — Since my last report four students have received certificates on 
completing the short course, and one has been graduated from the full 
course in pharmacy. 

All of last year's class have good positions in the drug trade. Mr. \V. 
B. Webster, of the class of 1898, whose sole store experience has been 
gained since his graduation, has been passed, with high rank, by the 
Massachusetts Board of Pharmacy, noted for its rigid examinations. He 
was one of three who succeeded out of twenty-five candidates. 

Nearly all our graduates are in good positions, and are discharging 
their duties with credit to their alma mater. Most of them are in the 
retail drug trade, a few ac proprietors ; some in the wholesale trade ; 
some in the governmental service, in chemical industries, in hospital dis- 
pensaries, and in medicine. 

Attractive openings for college graduates are more certain in pharmacy 
than in most other technical lines. The general requirement, by the 
States, that the pharmacist pass an examination before a state board 
eliminates the unfitted or reduces him to a menial position, thus protect- 
ing the skilled pharmacist from the overcrowding of his profession, and 
frees him from a forced competition with the incompetent, conditions 
which are too common in most other industrial fields. Good openings 
have come to my notice which I could not fill. At the present time I have 
a request made for a registered student to fill a specially fine position, but 
I have no candidate. This anomalous trade condition is largely inde- 
pendent of the present improved economic conditions, and may be con- 
sidered fairly permanent. It is most encouraging to young men desirous 
of making pharmacy their life work. 

Schools of pharmacy have not profited fully by the increased public 
demand for educated pharmacists, for reasons which I have elsewhere 
sought more particularly to set forth. It is sufficient to note here our 
national trait of insisting on the shortest route to a desired end, without 
proper regard to methods and consequences, a course which leads to 
incomplete preparation that defeats the end, prevents the attainment of 
the material rewards sought, and, a still more serious thing, destroys 
scholarship and dwarfs mental development. 

In this connection I have been called upon before to lament the rela- 
tively small number of students in the four years' course. The present 
sophomore class has six enrolled in this course, an indication of improve- 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY T>7 

ment in this respect. The enrollment in pharmacy, in both the long and 
short course, taken in relation to the total number of students in the Uni- 
versity, is larger than in the western universities whose catalogues I have 
had the opportunity of examining. There are eight in the entering class 
of the short course this year, the largest number since the more rigid 
entrance requirements became generally known to applicants. 

It is in many ways desirable that a register of former students and 
graduates, with their present residences and occupations, be at once com- 
pleted and published. To this end the co-operation of all possessing such 
knowledge is earnestly requested. As a possible means of helping alumni 
to a betterment of position, such knowledge may be of value, as indicated 
in an instance above cited. 

Certain changes in the curriculum are in contemplation, or have been 
already announced in the catalogue, both in the short, and in the full 
course. Perhaps the most important contemplated change is the dropping 
of thesis work from the short course. The time allowable, and the pre- 
vious training had in that course, are, in general, insufficient for the thor- 
oughness requisite to thesis preparation. The time thus saved will be 
spent in the laboratories of pharmacy and microbotany — the latter to deal 
especially with the examination of powdered drugs. 

The degree offered for the short course has been changed from Ph. G., 
granted three years after graduation, to Ph. C, granted on graduation. 
This new practice is in harmony with the prevailing custom of the uni- 
versity schools of pharmacy. A gold prize, given this year for the first 
time, offered for highest rank and general excellence in chemistry, open 
only to pharmacy students and on graduation, was won by George Pear- 
son Larrabee. 

The additions to the library, made since my last report, were urgently 
needed, and are now in frequent, sometimes daily, use in this department, 
and in the department of chemistry. 

Theses presented since last report, most of which have been abstracted 
in the Proceedings of the State Pharmaceutical Association, or in the 
pharmacy journals, are: 

Adulterations of Certain Powdered Drugs, by W. B. Webster. 

Adulterations of Certain Essential Oils, by G. L. Hilton. 

Urinalysis by the Pharmacist, by W. H. Crowell. 

Bibliography of Diastase, by A. J. Nute. 

Market Quality of Hydrogen Peroxide, by D. R. Taft. 

Examination of Prescott and Gordin's method of Alkaloidal Estima- 
tion, by G. P. Larrabee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. F. JACKMAN, 

Professor of Pharmacy. 
3 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



President A. IV. Harris: 

Sir : — A course in general biology has been added to the list of biolog- 
ical studies this year. The course is intended for students who are begin- 
ning the study of this line of science, and serves as a preparation for 
further work in zoology, botany or physiology. Students whose inter- 
ests lie for the most part along other lines of study, but who desire to get 
some knowledge of living things, will find this course adapted to their 
needs. 

Like most of the courses of study that are offered in this department, 
the course in general biology consists of both recitations and laboratory 
work. This is believed to be a necessary arrangement. In the laboratory 
the student becomes familiar with certain facts that cannot be gained in 
any other way; but, in order that the facts may be arranged and their 
significance understood, recitations are quite as necessary. 

The work in zoology has been arranged so that it extends through both 
the fall and the spring terms. The courses of the department are graded 
and extend through three years. Advanced work may also be elected. 

Students taking advanced work usually elect some subject for investi- 
gation, and are encouraged to devise means for working out the problems 
that arise. They receive instruction regarding methods of laboratory 
work, such as staining, imbedding, sectioning, and reconstructing animals 
or plants, as the case may be, but the importance of direct observation on 
the living forms is not lost sight of. 

Increased facilities in the way of apparatus and laboratory space have 
added greatly to the efficiency of the department. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GILMAN A. DREW, 

Professor of Biology. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



President A. IV. Harris: 

Sir: — The work of the College of Agriculture is partly instruction and 
partly investigation, and comprises the four years' course in agriculture, 
the special courses in general agriculture, in horticulture and in dairying, 
and the Agricultural Experiment Station. The agricultural instruction 
is given by the departments of Biology, Biological Chemistry, Animal 
Industry, Bacteriology and Veterinary Science, Horticulture, and Agri- 
culture. The work of investigation is carried on by the Experiment 
Station. The farm, the dairy, the poultry and sheep plants, the green- 
houses, orchards and gardens are maintained partly for purposes of 
instruction and partly for investigation. The funds for the maintenance 
of the Experiment Station are derived from the U. S. government and 
from fees, and no part of them come from the State treasury, endow- 
ments, or Federal appropriations for instruction purposes. The details 
of the work of the Station, including the receipts and expenditures, are 
given in its annual report, which makes Part II of the Annual Report of 
the University of Maine. The present report is concerned with the work 
of instruction. 

Courses. The four years' course has been changed slightly in time 
arrangement and in studies pursued. The chief changes are in the line 
of progress in biological instruction. A course in forestry has been 
added. In order to facilitate the work of instruction and to avoid unnec- 
essary yearly repetition of subjects it has been arranged to give certain 
technical subjects on alternate years. 

The special courses in agriculture vary in length from two weeks to two 
years. As in the past, special students in agriculture are admitted at any 
time, and to such subjects, as they are fitted for by their previous train- 
ing. Plans were perfected for the introduction of a correspondence 
course in agriculture during the present year ; but the death of one mem- 
ber of the agricultural faculty, and the temporary withdrawal of another 
member from his usual work as the result of a severe accident, have made 
it necessary to defer the introduction of this course. 

The Instruction. The facilities for instruction in agriculture are excel- 
lent, and superior to those afforded by most institutions. The growth, 
from one man in the department, with very inadequate facilities, to the 
present condition of six professors, with modern and well equipped 
laboratories and buildings, is marked. Every endeavor is made to keep 
the instruction abreast of the times. Graduates from the full course in 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

agriculture have contributed greatly to the advances made in agriculture; 
and future improvements in the science and practice of agriculture will 
likewise depend largely upon such graduates. 

The College of Agriculture, more than all other departments of the 
University, is doing a large and increasing amount of general educational 
work in the State. In its work of investigation and instruction, it is 
greatly aided by the cordial appreciation and sympathy of the Maine 
Board of Agriculture, which puts it in touch with the best agriculture 
of the State. The large correspondence with the more progressive 
farmers, the publications of the Station, and the work of the agricultural 
faculty in farmers' institutes, before granges, and other farmers' organ- 
izations, are ways in which the educational facilities of the college are 
used to promote better thought and practice among the farmers of the 
State. 

CHAS. D. WOODS, 

Professor in Charge. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HORTI- 
CULTURE 



President A. IV. Harris: 

Sir : — Since my last report the work of the department of horticulture 
has been conducted along the same general lines as in previous years, 
although the course of instruction has been rearranged. 

More attention has of late been given to practical details of commercial 
horticulture, and, through the medium of farmers' institutes and the 
State Pomological Society, much more time than formerly has been spent 
in lecturing in different parts of the State. 

In view of the vast forest interests of the State, it seems of special 
importance that a systematic study of the problems relating to forest 
conservation should be conducted at the University. As a beginning in 
this direction, I have offered an elementary course in forestry, which is 
elective in the Agricultural, Scientific, and Latin-Scientific courses. 
Should this course meet with your approval, I would recommend the 
extension of the work, and at an early date the establishment of a school 
of forestry, with a reservation where practical illustrations may be made. 

In addition to the course in forestry, a course in Plant Pathology has 
been added to the regular work in horticulture. This course is not 
designed to interfere with the regular course in cryptogamic botany, but 
deals particularly with the diseases of the more commonly cultivated 
plants. 

The equipment for effective work in horticultural lines is equalled by 
very few colleges. My only regret is that the number of young men 
and women who take advantage of the opportunities offered is not larger. 

Substantial improvements have been made in the campus, particularly 
in the extensive plantings made and the construction of new walks and 
drives; while the growth of trees and shrubs already planted makes 
apparent something of the design of previous work. 

In the botanical work of the department I have been assisted by Mr. 
Elmer D. Merrill and by Mr. Oliver O. Stover, both of whom were 
faithful and conscientious in performing the work assigned them. 

In conclusion"! wish to express to you my appreciation of the interest 
you have shown in the department, and the substantial aid in executing 
the plans made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. MUNSON, 

Professor of Horticulture. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL 
INDUSTRY 



President A. IV. Harris: 

Sir : — My work as Professor of Animal Industry includes the teaching 
of the following subjects: Agricultural Engineering, Stock Breeding, 
Stock Feeding, Dairying, and Poultry Industry. The instruction in the 
classroom is illustrated in the field, barns, sheep fold, poultry buildings, 
incubator room, and dairy building. 

The equipment for poultry instruction is very good, but should be 
added to by the erection of a small piped brooder house. A suitable 
building, properly equipped, would probably cost $500. 

The wooden floor of the dairy building has been replaced by one of 
cement, which is a decided improvement. The walls and ceiling, which 
are now of lath and plaster, suffer from the jar from the machinery and 
should be sheathed with wood. 

We now have on the farm representatives of Jerseys and of four 

breeds of sheep, viz., Dorsets, Shropshires, Oxfords, Hampshires, and five 

Cheviots. I regard it necessary that we add to the cattle, two Ayreshires, 

two Shorthorns, two Herefords, and two Holsteins ; and to the sheep, two 

Cotswolds, two Leicesters, two Merinoes and two Southdowns, so that 

students may gain a knowledge of these important breeds by the study 

of live specimens. With this object I have been accustomed to visit, 

with the students, blooded herds in this vicinity ; but, unfortunately, 

there are few such in this section of the State, and at the best such visits 

do not allow of close study. 

. S The arrangement, recently made, by which my teaching is all done in 

, p U ^pring term, has given me during the fall term unusual opportunity 

other me^lic lectures on agricultural subjects at farmers' institutes and 

the State.Vetings. Since my last report, I have delivered in all parts of 

Over one hundred such addresses. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. M. GOWELL, 
Professor of Animal Industry. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL 
ENGINEERING 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir : — During the two years since my last report the work of the 
department has been conducted without important changes. Instruction 
is given to the sophomores in Plane Surveying; to the juniors in Higher 
Surveying and Railroad Engineering; and to the seniors in Hydraulic, 
Sanitary, and Structural Engineering. Besides these technical subjects, 
instructors in this department teach to all of the engineering students 
Free-hand Drawing, Mechanical Drawing, Descriptive Geometry, and 
Mechanics. 

During this year there are fifty-six students in civil engineering in 
the three upper classes, divided as follows: seniors, 8; juniors, 20; 
sophomores, 28. Eight men were graduated from the department in 
1899, and eighteen in 1900. These men have found remunerative employ- 
ment in engineering work, so far as it has been desired. 

We have recently purchased a Fteley current meter and a Dumpy 
level. The increasing number of students will render necessary a further 
increase in instrumental equipment. The space and facilities for instruc- 
tion in drawing are, I think, ample. 

During the academic year of 1899- 1900 I was assisted by Mr. C. P. 
Weston, instructor; Mr. W. A. Murray, assistant; and Mr. H. H. Clark, 
tutor in drawing. This year Mr. Weston remains as instructor, Mr. 
C. H. Lombard and Mr. P. R. Goodwin are assistants, and Mr. C. L. 
Cole is tutor in drawing. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. C. GROVER, 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING 



President A. W . Harris: 

Sir : — This report covers not only the instruction work of the Depart- 
ment of Mechanical Engineering, but also the construction and repairs 
throughout the University, which are in my charge. 

The work of instruction in this department remains as at the time of 
:my last report, except for a few unimportant changes which are noted 
in the catalogue. Mr. Perley Walker, who was instructor in mechanical 
engineering for four years, has severed his connection with the Univer- 
sity in order to take up the study of naval architecture. He was an 
efficient teacher, who had the interests of the department very much at 
heart, and was unsparing in his labors to improve and maintain the 
standard of instruction. He has been succeeded by Mr. F. H. Vose, a 
graduate in the class of 1900. 

Among the apparatus added during the two years just passed are a 
gas engine indicator of the Crosby make, a 15-in. Handy-Norton Lathe, 
a Universal Grinding Machine, and a brass furnace. The capacity of 
the shop, and the variety of instruction in shop work, have both been 
increased. Mr. Steward has used the construction method in his shop 
instruction more largely than ever before, and our experience indicates 
that it may wisely be extended, on account of the active interest which 
it arouses in the student. 

The department is on a fair footing compared with the past, but there 
is still urgent need of development, especially in the provision for labora- 
tory work. A mechanical laboratory should be constructed in connection 
with the power plant, and I urgently recommend that immediate steps 
be taken for this development. The shop building is of wood and was 
built eighteen years ago. It has been enlarged and rearranged from 
time to time to suit new demands, and has served its purpose admirably, 
but hard use and age are telling upon it, and its days are numbered. It 
is sadly in need of repairs, which will nearly amount to rebuilding, and 
is growing worse rapidly. It is no longer sufficient for our work and 
grows more unsatisfactory every year. From the nature of its uses, 
it is much more liable to fire than any other building on the campus. 
I consider that the time has come when we can no longer delay the 
building of a brick shop. In connection with it, there should be a gen- 
eral repair shop, rooms for storage of lumber, paint and other materials. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 45. 



WATER SUPPLY. 

Until last year the water supply depended upon a single pump, but 
as this had been in constant use for ten years and repairs were likely to 
be necessary at any time, it was considered unsafe to put our absolute 
dependence upon it. Accordingly a 5-inch x 8-inch triplex power pump 
with a capacity of 100 gallons per minute was installed. This is con- 
nected by an electric motor with either the steam engine or the gas 
engine. By use of the latter a fire stream can be started in a very few 
minutes, and maintained until steam can be furnished for the steam 
pump. With the pump it was necessary to install a 5 horse power elec- 
tric motor to drive it, and other necessary instruments and wiring. A 
separate 4-inch galvanized iron suction pipe was laid to the river, and 
the whole system supplied with a 6-inch water guage. In order to supply 
the house occupied by Prof. Harrington, the Kappa Sigma House, the 
Mt. Vernon House and the Phi Gamma Delta House with fire protec- 
tion, a 4-inch pipe was laid from the main near Coburn Hall to a point 
near the Phi Gamma Delta House. Two hydrants have been put in 
place, so that each of these buildings can be reached by two lines of fire 
hose. This pipe has been tapped by one running to the Webster House, 
Hooper house, and the Alpha Tau Omega House. With this extension 
the University has no responsibility beyond supplying water. The sys- 
tem has been extended to ihe drill hall, and connection made with the 
sewer. The standpipe has been thoroughly cleaned and painted inside 
and out. Several braces in the tower, which were found in bad con- 
dition, have been renewed, and a new frost proof box put around the 
supply pipe. Our water system is a double one, including not only the 
main supply of water drawn from the river, but a second one for drink- 
ing water, pumped from an artesian well. A single system would be 
easier to maintain, but would involve an installation expense either for 
filtering the river water, or for boring wells to supply the whole amount 
needed. Our consumption is not large, seldom exceeding 20,000 gallons 
a day. The present artesian well cost only $150, exclusive of windmill 
and power, and furnishes about 8,000 gallons of water per day. It there- 
fore seems easy to obtain at a moderate expense a supply of pure artesian 
water sufficient for all purposes. The present supply of artesian water 
is pumped by a windmill, and is satisfactory when the wind blows, but 
fails occasionally. I urge that the artesian well system be extended 
until an adequate snpplv is found, and that the use of river water be 
entirely discontinued. If this seems impracticable, I consider it necessary 
that another well be driven at a convenient point, and equipped with an 
electric pump for use when the supply from the windmill is exhausted. 

HEATING PLANT. 

In the summer of 1899 extensive repairs to the heating system of 
Fernald Hall and Oak Hall became necessary, and these two buildings, 
and Wingate Hall, which stands between them, were connected with the 
boiler at the shop by means of an underground pipe laid in a tunnel. 



46 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Owing to a difficulty in the plan on which the tunnel was constructed, 
and the inferior quality of the cement used, the tunnel was flooded in 
the spring and the use of the pipe became too expensive to be continued. 
Heat was furnished the several buildings by their own boilers, which 
have not been removed. During the summer of 1900 this tunnel has 
been rebuilt entirely of brick, with concrete bottom, and ample drains. 
The system is so piped that the exhaust steam from the engines can be 
turned on and used to heat the dormitory, whenever the engine is run- 
ning. As now constructed, the system seems entirely successful. A 
supply and return pipe have been laid to the drill hall for use when the 
building is completed.. 

The present demands upon the boiler in the light station are entirely 
beyond its capacity, and in cold weather it will be extremely difficult to 
make it do the work demanded of it. The load at all times is entirely 
too heavy to allow economical results, and an accident, requiring repairs, 
would leave several buildings without heat. It is imperatively necessary 
that during the coming summer an additional boiler, similar to the one 
now installed, be added to the plant. The work already done is a very 
important beginning of the coming heating, power^ and light plant, but, 
when such a plant is established, it should be placed in a new location. 
This plant should be installed at the earliest possible date, as the installa- 
tion of additional boilers in the present location would involve a large 
waste. I respectfully urge that every possible effort be made to provide 
3 plant for supplying heat, light, and power to every available building 
on the campus. 

I earnestly call attention to the need of a carefully designed venti- 
lating system for Coburn Hall and Fernald Hall. The heating pipes in 
the basement of Oak Hal! need to be rearranged to allow the condensed 
water to return to the heating plant. 



CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIRS. 

Lavatories and urinals have been placed on the second and third floors 
of the men's dormitory, the rooms on the fourth floor have been repainted 
and repapered, and the woodwork in all the halls has been shellaced. 
I suggest that the walls of rooms on the first, second and third floors 
be tinted and the woodwork repainted. The rooms in Wingate Hall, 
formerly occupied by the Young Men's Christian Association, have been 
divided into recitation rooms and an office, and a very satisfactory room 
in Oak Hall provided for the Association. 

The Experiment Station has been enlarged by an addition, two stories 
high and twenty- five feet square. The north tenement of the Maples has 
been painted and papered throughout, the cellar wall relaid, electric 
lights introduced, and much of the old plastering repaired. This tene- 
ment is now in a very satisfactory condition. A bathroom has been added 
to the south tenement, and the sewer relaid. The whole building has 
been painted on the outside. An observatory has been built for the 
departmeni of Mathematics and Astronomy. The wooden floor in the 
dairy building has been replaced by one of cement. The cellar wall on 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OK MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 47 

the north side of the Commons building has been relaid, and the roof 
reshingled. The building should be repainted during the coming year. 
The shed and outbuildings are in bad condition, and need quite extensive 
repairs. The ell of the house occupied by Prof. Harrington has been 
raised one story, a bathroom furnished, a piazza built on the east side, 
the cellar cemented, a large part of the house painted and papered, and 
electric lights installed. It is now in the best condition in every respect. 
Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER FLINT, 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

In Charge of Construction and Repairs. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING 



President A. W. Harris: 

Sir : — Since, taking charge of the Department of Electrical Engineer- 
ing in September, 1899, change? have been made in the electrical work 
of the course as follows : 

Junior year, spring term : work in "Dynamo Design," taken up in 
lectures, has been introduced as a part of the course in Electricity and 
Magnetism. Senior year, fall term : a required course in "Alternating 
Currents" has been substituted for two elective courses in "Telephony" 
and "Power Stations." The text book used is Jackson's "Alternating 
Currents and Alternating Current Machinery." The course in Labora- 
tory Electricity has been improved and developed by reason of an 
increase of equipment to be described later. A laboratory course in the 
senior year, spring term, "Alternating Currents," has been introduced, 
taking a part of the time formerly used in "Electrical Design." This 
change has been made possible by the increase of equipment. 

In the spring term of 1900 a short course in "Polyphase Alternating 
Currents" was given in place of Theoretical Electricity." Beginning 
with the present year a course in ""Electrical Signalling" including 
telegraphy and telephony will be substituted for "Theoretical Electricity." 

Two courses in Laboratory Chemistry have been introduced as elec- 
tives in the Junior year. These are Qualitative Analysis, fall term, and 
Quantitative Analysis in the spring term. These courses are of great 
general value, and will serve as a preparation for work in Electro- 
chemistry, which it is hoped may soon be taken up. 

Beginning with the present academic year changes have been made 
in the electrical work of the Mechanical Engineering course as follows: 
Junior year, fall term : a new course on "Dynamos" has been substituted 
for the course in "Electricity and Magnetism." The new course is better 
suited to the needs of Mechanical Engineering students. Senior year, 
spring term : a course in "Dynamo Laboratory Work" has been intro- 
duced. This course is intended to render the students familiar with the 
care, running, and testing of direct current generators and motors. 

The equipment for laboratory and experimental work has been mate- 
rially increased. A room in the basement of Wingate Hall has been 
fitted up with benches and stands for machines, switch board, distribu- 
tion board, distributing circuits, water rheostats, etc. Over $2500 has 
been expended for this purpose and for new equipment. The additions 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 49 

have proved satisfactory, and provide very good facilities for direct cur- 
rent work. For the work in alternating currents the provisions are not 
as good. As an addition to the laboratory equipment the following is 
recommended : 
i 5 K. W. alternating and direct current generator $300 00 

1 4 H. P. induction motor 250 00 

2 indicating wattmeters, 10 K. W 200 00 

2 alternating current ammeters 100 00 

2 alternating current voltmeters 100 00 

2 2 K. W. transformers 50 00 



$1,000 00 

POWER PLANT. 

The care of the Power Plant was divided between the Mechanical 
and Electrical Departments until October, 1899, but at that time it was 
transferred to the Electrical Department alone. 

The plant furnishes light for buildings and grounds, steam for heating 
several of the buildings, steam power for running the shop, and electrical 
power for the pumping station, for the electrical laboratory, and for run- 
ning machinery for the Experiment Station and farm. The lights include 
four arc lights and over thirteen hundred incandescent lamps. 

The boiler is in good condition, but is worked beyond its normal 
capacity during a large part of the cold weather, 'the storage battery 
is not in good condition. The active material of the plates is nearly 
exhausted. It serves, however, for carrying a small lighting load during 
portions of the twenty-four hours. The remainder of the equipment is 
in good working order and adequate to meet the requirements. 

The following apparatus has been added during the past year : 

15 horse power Otto gasolene engine $739 00 

Installation of gas engine together with necessary pulleys, 

belts, piping, etc 240 00 

50 horse power Bundy exhaust steam oil separator 28 00 

100 horse power National feed water heater 84 00 

Pipe and labor installing separator and heater 30 00 

200 to 500 ampere general electric circuit breaker 40 00 

200 ampere recording wattmeter 55 00 

Installing circuit breaker and wattmeter 1000 

Switches 20 00 

Carbon brushes and holders for both dynamos 38 00 



$1,284 00 
The reason for installing this new apparatus was as follows : The 
gasolene engine was bought to replace in part the storage battery in 
carrying moderate loads, when the steam engine was not running. It 
has been of decided advantage, also, as an aid to the steam plant at 
times of heavy duty. During the summer vacation it has been an 
economical source of all the power required. 



50 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

The Bundy operator serves to separate the cylinder oil from the 
exhaust steam used in heating, and allows the water returning from the 
heating system to be fed to the boiler without injury. The feed water 
heater utilizes a part of the heat in the exhaust steam in heating feed 
water. It is an aid to economical running and adds to the capacity of 
the plant. The circuit breaker was installed as a safeguard to apparatus, 
and offers less interruption to service than the blowing of a fuse. The 
recording wattmeter serves to give an accurate record of the electrical 
output of the plant. 

New carbon brushes were put on the dynamos in place of copper 
brushes, as requiring less attention, keeping commutators in better con- 
dition and adding materially to their life. 

The boiler in the power station, as before stated, is worked beyond its 
normal capacity during quite a part of the cold weather. It is recom- 
mended that another boiler of at least ioo horse power capacity be 
installed to serve as a reserve in case of breakdown, and as an auxiliary 
during times of heavy duty. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. WEBB, 
Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
In Charge of Heat and Light Station. 



REFORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



Preside lit A. W. Harris: 

Sir: — The two years covered by this report are the most prosperous 
the library has enjoyed. The increase in the number of books and the 
use made of them by students are gratifying. The interest manifested 
by the members of the- faculty is particularly pleasing. 

There have been added to the library during the years 1899 and 1900 
5,696 books and 1.4 13 pamphlets. The increase is almost double that of 
the two years immediately preceding, and about four times that of any 
earlier two years. The growth in circulation was about 25 per cent. 
The total number of volumes in the library at present is 19,650, and of 
pamphlets about 8,000. 

The increase in growth and circulation has made necessary the employ- 
ment of a regular assistant since the spring of 1898. Miss Geneva Ring 
Hamilton, a graduate of the library course formerly conducted here, has 
served since last spring in a very satisfactory manner. Mr. Harold E. 
Cook acted as assistant librarian for the School of Law until last June, 
and this year Mr. Nathan G. Foster is serving in that same capacity. 

The newspaper reading room in Oak Hall was required for other pur- 
poses, and since the fall of 1899 the papers have been on file in the 
reading room in Cobnrn Hall under my direct supervision. This 
arrangement has been, on the whole, more satisfactory than the former 
one. 

One of the most imperative needs of the library is the completion of 
sets of periodicals. Scientific and technical text-books are out of date 
almost as soon as published. Current numbers of periodicals give infor- 
mation of the latest advances in knowledge, and back volumes furnish a 
record of the work of the past. The growth in the number and wealth 
of libraries has resulted in a great increase in the demand for sets of 
periodicals and is causing a rapid advance in price. The policy of liberal 
expenditures for current periodicals, and for the completion of the files 
of the important ones, is that pursued by all progressive libraries. 

The increase in the number of volumes in the library has resulted in 
greatly overcrowding the stack room. The removal of the University 
offices from Coburn Hall, and the assignment of the rooms now occupied 
by them to the library, will give, temporarily, sufficient accommodations ; 
but the need for a library building within a few years is apparent. 
Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH KNEELAND JONES, 

Librarian. 



KEY TO MAP 



Athletic Field. 

Grand Stand. 

Beta Theta Pi House. 

Tennis Courts. 

Pumping Station. 

Janitor's House. 

Doniitory and Com- 
mons. 

Wingatc Hall. 

Fernald Hall. 

Shop. 

Drill Hall and Gym- 
nasium. 

Q. T. V. Hall. 

Coburn Hall. 

President's House. 

Observatory. 

Horticultural Build- 
ings. 

Experiment Station. 

Professors' House. 

Stable. 

Dairy Building. 

Barns. 

Farm Superintend- 
ent's House. 

Professor's House. 

Kappa Sigma House. 

Mount Vernon House. 

Phi Gamma Delta 
House. 

B. O. & O. Waiting 
Rooms. 




KEY TO MAP 



Athletic Fteli.. 

Grand Stand. 

Beta Theta Pi House. 

Tennis Courts. 

Pumping station. 

Janitor's House. 

Oomitory and Com- 
mons. 

Wingate Hall. 

Kernald Hall. 

Shop. 

Drill Hall and Gym- 
nasium. 

QT. V. Hall. 

Coburn Hall. 

President's House. 

Observatory. 

Horticultural Build- 
ings. 

Experiment Station. 

Professors' House. 

Stable. 

Dairy Building. 

Barns. 

Farm Superintend- 
ent's House. 

Professor's House. 

Kappa Sigma House. 

MountVernon House. 

Phi Gamma Delta 
House. 

t. O. & O. Waiting 
Rooms. 




CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



University of Maine 



1900=1901 




ORONO, MAINE 



AUGUSTA, MAINE 
KENNEBEC JOURNAL PRINT 

1901 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Calendar 6 

The Board of Trustees, 9 

The Advisory Board for the School of Law, 9 

The Experiment Station Council 10 

Alumni Associations, 1 1 

The Faculty and other Officers, 12 

Standing Committees of the Faculty, 16 

Establishment of the University, 18 

Endowment and Income, 19 

Location, 19 

Buildings and their Equipment, 20 

Library, 24 

Museum and Herbarium, 25 

Organizations, 26 

University Publications, 27 

Military Instruction, 29 

Public Worship, « 30 

Field Day, 30 

General Regulations, 31 

Scholarship Honors, 32 

Degrees, 32 

Student Expenses, 33 

Loans, 36 

Scholarships and Prizes, 37 



4 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

PAGE 

Admission, 38 

Entrance Examinations, 40 

Table of Entrance Requirements, 42 

Entrance Requirements, 43 

Admission by Certificate 47 

Approved Schools, 47 

The Departments of Instruction : 

English, 51 

Modern Languages, 52 

Latin, 55 

Greek, 58 

Philosophy, 60 

Civics and History, 61 

Law, 62 

Mathematics and Astronomy, 65 

Physics 68 

Drawing 70 

Chemistry, 71 

Biology, 74 

Agriculture, 76 

Horticulture, 78 

Pharmacy, , 80 

Civil Engineering, 82 

Mechanical Engineering, 85 

Electrical Engineering, 87 

Military Science and Tactics 89 

Organization of the University: 

General Statement, 91 

Explanation of Tables, 92 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 5 

The College of Arts and Sciences : page 

The Classical Course 93 

The Latin- Scientific Course 95 

The Scientific Course 98 

The Chemical Course 100 

The Preparatory Medical Course 101 

The College of Agriculture : 

The Agricultural Course 103 

The Special Courses in Agriculture 105 

The Agricultural Experiment Station, 107 

The College of Engineering: 

The Civil Engineering Course 109 

The Mechanical Engineering Course in 

The Electrical Engineering Course, 112 

The College of Pharmacy : 

The Pharmacy Course 115 

The Short Course in Pharmacy 116 

The School of Law : 

The Faculty, 118 

General Statement, 119 

Admission, 119 

Methods of Instruction 119 

Courses of Study, 120 

Expenses, 120 

Commencement, 122 

Certificates and Degrees, 122 

Appointments 126 

Catalogue of the Students, 128 

Index, 141 



U NIVEKSIT Y OF M A I N E 



CALENDAR 



FALL TERM, 1900. 



September 17, 
September 18, 
September 19, 
November 27, 
November 27, 

December 4, 
December 7, 
December 20, 



Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Tuesday, 

Tuesday, 

Tuesday, 

Friday, 

Thursday, 



January 1, Tuesday, 

January 3, Thursday, 

January 25, Friday, 



Arrearage examinations begin. 
Entrance examinations begin. 
Fall term begins. 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Thanksgiving recess begins, 4.30 

P. M. 
Thanksgiving recess ends, 7.45 A.M. 
Sophomore prize declamations. 
Christmas recess begins, 4.30 P. M. 

1901. 

Arrearage examinations begin 
(Spring term studies). 
Christmas recess ends, 7.45 A. M. 
Fall term ends. 



SPRING TERM, 1901. 
January 25, Friday, Entrance examinations begin. 

January 28, Monday, Spring term begins. 

February 22, Friday, Washington's birthday. 

April 3, Wednesday. Easter recess begins, 4.30 P. M. 

April 8, Monday, Arrearage examinations begin 

(Fall term studies). 
April 10, Wednesday, Easter recess ends, 7.45 A. M. 

May 17, Friday, Ivy day. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



May 


25. 


Saturday, 


Max- 


30, 


Thursday, 


June 


8, 


Saturday, 


June 


9- 


Sunday, 


June 


10, 


Monday, 


June 


10, 


Alonday, 


June 


11, 


Tuesday, 


June 


11, 


Tuesday, 


June 


11, 


Tuesday, 


June 


ii, 


Tuesday, 


June 


12, 


Wednesday, 


June 


12, 


Wednesday, 


June 


12, 


Wednesday* 


June 


12, 


Wednesday, 


June 


13. 


Thursday, 
FALL 


September 


16, 


Monday, 


September 


17, 


Tuesday, 


September 


19. 


Thursday, 


November 26, 


Tuesday, 


November 26, 


Tuesday, 



December 3, Tuesday, 
December 6, Friday, 

December 19, Thursday, 

December 31, Tuesday, 



Senior vacation begins. 

Memorial day. 

Junior exhibition. 

Baccalaureate sermon. 

Convocation. 

Class day. 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Exhibition drill. 

Receptions by the fraternities. 

Reception by the President. 

Commencement. 

Commencement dinner. 

Meeting of the Alumni Association. 

Commencement concert. 

Entrance examinations begin. 



TERM, 1901. 

Arrearage examinations begin. 

Entrance examinations begin. 

Fall term begins. 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Thanksgiving recess begins, 4.30 

P. M. 

Thanksgiving recess ends, 7.45 A.M. 

Sophomore prize declamations. 

Christmas recess begins, 4.30 P. M. 

Arrearage examinations begin 

(Spring term studies). 



January 2, Thursday 

January 26, Fridav, 



1902. 

Christmas recess ends, 7.45 A. M. 

Fall term ends. 



» UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

SPRING TERM, 1902. 
January 26, Friday, Entrance examinations begin. 

January 29, Monday, Spring term begins. 

June 11, Wednesday, Commencement. 



CALENDAR OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 
1900. 
October 3, Wednesday, Fall term begins. 
December 19, Wednesday, Fall term ends. 

1901. 
January 9, Wednesday, Winter term begins. 
March 20, Wednesday, Winter term ends. 

March 27, Wednesday, Spring term begins. 

June 12, Wednesday, Commencement. 



1901. 
October 2, Wednesday, Fall term begins. 
December 18, Wednesday, Fall term ends. 

1902. 
January 8, Wednesday, Winter term begins. 
March 19, Wednesday, Winter term ends. 

March 26, Wednesday, Spring term begins. 

June 11, Wednesday, Commencement. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Hon. Henry Lord, President, Bangor. 
Hon. William Thomas Haines, LL. D., Secretary, Waterville. 

Hon. Elliott Wood, Winthrop. 

Hon. Charles Plummer Allen, B. S., Presque Isle. 

Hon. John Alfred Roberts, M. A., Norway. 

Hon. Edward Brackett Winslow, Portland. 

Hon. Voranus Lathrop Coffin, Harrington. 

Hon. Albert Joseph Durgin, Orono. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Trustees Lord, Haines, and Allen. 



TREASURER 
Hon. Isaiah Kidder Stetson, B. Ph., 



Bangor. 



ADVISORY BOARD FOR THE SCHOOL OF LAW 



Hon. Charles Hamlin, M. A., President, 
Hon. Henry Bradstreet Cleaves, 
Hon. William Henry Fogler, 
Hon. William Thomas Haines, LL. D., 
Hon. Herbert Milton Heath, M. A., 
Hon. Andrew Peters Wis well, B. A., 



Bangor. 

Portland. 

Rockland. 

Waterville. 

Augusta. 

Ellsworth. 



Dean George Enos Gardner, M. A., Secretary, 



Bangor. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



THE EXPERIMENT STATION COUNCIL 



Abram Winegardner Harris, Sc. D., LL. D., President, Orono. 

Charles Dayton Woods, B. S., Secretary, Orono. 

Edward Brackett Winslow, Portland. 

Voranus Lathrop Coffin, Harrington. 

John Alfred Roberts, M. A., Norway. 

Benjamin Walker McKeen, Fryeburg. 

Eugene Harvey Libbey, Auburn. 

Charles S. Pope, Manchester. 

James Monroe Bartlett, M. S., Orono. 

Lucius Herbert Merrill, B. S., Orono. 

Fremont Lincoln Russell, V. S., Orono. 

Welton Marks Munson, M. S., Orono. 

Gilbert Mottier Gowell, M. S., Orono. 

Gilman Arthur Drew, Ph. D., Orono. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE II 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION 

George H. Hamlin, President, Orono. 
Charles P. Weston, Recording Secretary, Orono. 
Ralph K. Jones, Corresponding Secretary, Orono. 

Albert H. Brown, Treasurer, Oldtown. 
James N. Hart, Necrologist, Orono. 

The West Maine Association 

L. G. Paine, 291 Commercial St., Portland, President. 
C. S. Webster, 53 Exchange St., Portland, Secretary. 

The North Maine Association 

Harvey B. Thayer, Presque Isle, President. 
N. H. Martin, Fort Fairfield, Secretary. 

The Boston Association 
Hon. L. C. Southard, 73 Tremont St., President. 
James W. Martin, 38 Oliver St., Secretary. 

The New York Association 

Rev. George L. Hanscom, 88 Sherman Ave., Newark, N. J., 

President. 

C. G. Cushman, 30 Broad St., Secretary. 

The Washington (D. C.) Association 

Professor F. Lamson-Scribner, Dep't. of Agriculture, President. 
Dr. George P. Merrill, National Museum, Secretary. 

The Penoescot Valley Association 
John M. Oak, Bangor, President. 
E. H. Kelley, Bangor, Secretary. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



THE FACULTY AND OTHER OFFICERS 



Abram Winegardner Harris, Sc. D., LL. D., Campus. 

President. 
Merritt Caldwell Fernald, Ph. D., Bennoch Street. 

Professor of Philosophy. 

Alfred Bellamy Aubert, M. S., Main Street. 

Professor of Chemistry. 
Allen Ellington Rogers, M. A., College Street. 

Professor of Political Economy and History, 
and Professor of Constitutional Law. 
Walter Flint, M. E., College Street. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
James Monroe Bartlett, M. S., College Street. 

Chemist in the Experiment Station. 

Lucius Herbert Merrill, B. S., Bennoch Street. 

Professor of Biological Chemistry, and 
Chemist in the Experiment Station. 
James Norris Hart, C. E., M. S., Campus. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Fremont Lincoln Russell, B. S., V. S., Main Street. 

Professor of Biology, and Veterinarian of the 
Experiment Station. 

Welton Marks Munson, M. S., Main Street. 

Professor of Horticulture, and Horticulturist of 
the Experiment Station. 
Horace Melvyn Estabrooke, M. S., M. A Main Street. 

Professor of English. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 13 

James Stacy Stevens, Ph. D Main Street. 

Professor of Physics. 

Gileert Mottier Gowell, M. S., Campus. 

Professor of Animal Industry, and Agriculturist 
of the Experiment Station. 

Charles Dayton Woods, B. S., Main Street. 

Professor of Agriculture, and Director of the 
Experiment Station. 

Nathan Clifford Grover, B. S., C. E., Mill Street. 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 
George Enos Gardner, M. A., Bangor. 

Professor of Law, and Dean of the School of Law. 
Howard Scott Webb, M. E., E. E., North Main Street. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Karl Pomeroy Harrington, M. A., Campus. 

Professor of Latin. 
John Homer Huddilston, Ph. D., Main Street. 

Professor of Greek. 
W'illiam Emanuel Walz, M. A., LL. B., Bangor. 

Professor of Law. 

Gilman Arthur Drew, Ph. D., Middle Street. 

Professor of Biology, and Zoologist of the 
Experiment Station. 



Professor of Military Science. 

Wilbur Fisk Jackman, B. S., Ph. C, Mill Street. 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacy. 
Garnett Ryland, Ph. D Main Street. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Orlando Faulkland Lewis, Ph. D., Campus. 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 
Ralph Kneeland Jones, B. S., Main Street. 

Librarian. 
Reginald Rusden Goodell, M. A., Main Street. 

Instructor in Modern Languages. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Charles Partridge Weston, C. E., Campus. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 
Arthur Wellington Price, B. A., LL. B., Bangor. 

Instructor in Law. 
Charles Hamlin, M. A., Bangor. 

Lecturer on Insolvency. 
Lucilius Alonzo Emery, LL. D., Ellsworth. 

Lecturer on Roman Law. 
Andrew Peters Wiswell, B. A., Ellsworth. 

Lecturer on Evidence. 
Louis Carver- Southard, M. S., Boston. 

Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. 
Forest John Martin, LL. B., Bangor. 

Lecturer on Maine Practice. 
Hugo Clark, C. E., Bangor. 

Lecturer on Equity Pleading. 
Stanley John Steward, B. M. E., Mill Street. 

Foreman of the Shop. 
Lucius Jerry Shepard, B. S., Campus. 

Assistant Horticulturist in the Experiment Station. 
Ora Willis Knight, M. S., Bangor. 

Assistant Chemist in the Experiment Station. 
Edwin Carleton Upton, B. S., Campus. 

Tutor in English and Modern Languages. 

Fred Hale Vose, B. M. E., Campus. 

Tutor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Louis Siff, B. S., Main Street. 

Tutor in Mathematics. 

Roscoe Milliken Packard, M. A., Campus. 

Tutor in Mathematics. 

William Porter Beck. B. S., Campus. 

Tutor in Physics. 

Clinton Llewellyn Cole, B. C. E., Campus. 

Tutor in Drawing. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 15 

Alden Bradford Owen, B. M. E., Peters Street. 

Tutor in Electrical Engineering. 
Edward Raymond Mansfield, B. S., Bennoch Street. 

Assistant Chemist in the Experiment Station. 
Charles Hutchinson Lombard, B. C. E., Campus. 

Assistant in Civil Engineering. 

Frank Henry Mitchell, B. S., Peters Street. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

James Arthur Hayes, B. S., Main Street. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Clifford Dyer Holley, B. S., Pine Street. 

Assistant Chemist in the Experiment Station. 
Wilfred Harold Caswell, B. M. E., Campus. 

Assistant in Physics. 
Philip Ross Goodwin, B. C. E., Main Street. 

Assistant in Civil Engineering. 

Percy Leroy Ricker, B. S., Peters Street. 

Assistant in Biology. 

Perley Spaulding, B. S., Campus. 

Assistant in Horticulture in the Experiment 
Station. 

Geneva Ring Hamilton, Myrtle Street. 

Assistant Librarian. 
Elizabeth Abbott Balentine, Forest Avenue. 

Secretary to the President and Secretary of the 
Faculty. 



l6 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 



Admission to Examinations 
Professor Fernald, Professor Webb, Mr. Weston. 

Approved Schools 
Pro-fessor Estabrooke, Professor Fernald, Professor Harrington, 
Professor Hart, Professor Huddilston, Professor Stevens. 

Athletics 
Professor Jones, Professor Lewis, Mr. Hayes. 

Catalogue 
Professor Harrington, Professor Jones, Professor Merrill. 

Course of Study 
Mr. Weston, Professor Hart, Professor Drew. 

Entrance Examinations 
Professor Harrington. 

Executive Committee 
Professor Hart, Professor Stevens, Professor Webb. 

Graduate Degrees 
Professor Fernald, Professor Estabrooke, Professor Harrington, 
Professor Webb. 

Honors 
Professor Grover, Professor Stevens, Professor Huddilston. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE l"J 



Library 
Professor Jones, Professor Estabrooke, Professor Flint, Pro- 
fessor Harrington, Professor Jackman. 

Rules 

Professor Woods, Professor Stevens, Professor Huddilston. 

Student Advisers 
For Freshmen in all courses : Professor Hart, Professor 
Ryland. 

For all other students in the Classical, Latin-Scientific, and 
Scientific Courses, Professor Harrington. 

For all other students in the Chemical, Agricultural, Pharmacy, 
and Preparatory Medical Courses. Professor Jackman. 

For all other students in the Civil Engineering Course, Profes- 
sor Grover. 

For all other students in the Mechanical Engineering Course, 
Professor Flint. 

For all other students in the Electrical Engineering Course, 
Professor Webb. 



l8 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



ESTABLISHMENT 

By an act of Congress, approved July 2, 1862, it was provided 
that there should be granted to the States, from the public lands, 
"thirty thousand acres for each Senator and Representative in 
Congress," from the sale of which there should be established a 
perpetual fund, "the interest of which shall be inviolably appro- 
priated, by each State which may take and claim the benefit of 
this act, to the endowment, support, and maintenance of at least 
one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding 
other scientific and classical studies, and including military tac- 
tics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agricul- 
ture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislatures of 
the States may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the 
liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions in life," The act forbade the 
use of any portion of the principal or interest of this fund for 
the purchase, erection, or maintenance of buildings ; and required 
each state taking the benefit of the provisions of the Act "to 
provide within five years not less than one college" to carry out 
the purposes of the Act. 

Maine accepted this grant in 1863, and in 1865 constituted "a 
body politic and corporate, by the name of the Trustees of the 
State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts." The 
Trustees were authorized to receive and hold donations, to select 
the professors and other officers of the college, to establish the 
conditions for admission, to lay out courses of study, to grant 
degrees, and to exercise other usual powers and privileges. 

The Governor and Council were given the right "to examine 
into the affairs of the college, and the doings of the trustees, and 
to inspect all their records and accounts, and the buildings and 
premises occupied by the college." 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE IQ 

It was provided that in addition to the studies especially- 
required by the Act of Congress, the college should teach such 
other studies as its facilities would permit. 

The Legislature of 1897 changed the name of the institution 
to "The University of Maine." 

ENDOWMENT AND INCOME 

The State of Maine received, under the Act of Congress above 
referred to, two hundred and ten thousand acres of public land, 
from which the University has realized an endowment fund of 
$118,300. This has been increased by a bequest of $100,000 from 
Abner Coburn of Skowhegan, who was for many years president 
of the Board of Trustees. The town of Orono contributed 
$8,000, and the town of Oldtown $3,000, for the purchase of the 
site on which the buildings stand. The State has appropriated 
about $300,000 for the material equipment. 

Under an Act of Congress approved March 2, 1887, the 
University receives $15,000 annually for the maintenance of the 
department known as the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Under an Act of Congress approved August 30, 1890, the 
University receives $25,000 annually for its more complete 
endowment and maintenance. 

Under an Act of the Legislature, approved March 20, 1897, 
the University receives $20,000 annually from the State for cur- 
rent expenses. Student fees and miscellaneous receipts com- 
plete the income. 



LOCATION 



The University has a beautiful and healthful location in the 
town of Orono, Penobscot county, half way between the vil- 
lages of Orono and Stillwater, three miles from the city of Old- 
town, and nine miles from the city of Bangor. The Stillwater 
river, a branch of the Penobscot, flows in front of the build- 
ings, forming the western boundary of the campus. Orono is 
upon the Maine Central Railroad and is easy of access from all 
parts of the State. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

The Bangor, Orono and Oldtown Electric Railroad runs 
through the university grounds. Visitors will find it convenient 
to take the electric cars at Bangor, Veazie, or Oldtown, as the 
electric road does not lun to the railroad station at Orono. Bag- 
gage may be sent to Orono by railroad. 

The School of Law is located in the Exchange Building, 
Bangor, at the corner of Exchange and State streets. 



THE BUILDINGS AND THEIR EQUIPMENT 



Wingate Hall. — The most conspicuous building on the cam- 
pus, Wingate Hall, named in honor of William P. Wingate of 
Bangor, long an honored member of the board of trustees, is a 
three-story brick structure, rectangular in form, with a handsome 
clock tower. It was erected for the departments of civil and 
mechanical engineering, but is at present occupied in part by 
other departments. On the ground floor are two large designing 
rooms, recitation rooms, instrument rooms, and private offices 
for the professors in the engineering departments. On the 
second floor are the offices and recitation rooms of the professors 
of physics, Greek, and Latin, the physical laboratory, and the 
apparatus room. On the third floor are large, well lighted draw- 
ing rooms. In the basement are the dynamo laboratory, and the 
testing room of the department of civil engineering. The test- 
ing room contains a Riehle testing machine of 60,000 pounds 
capacity, cement testing machine, etc. The dynamo laboratory 
is provided with six direct-current dynamos, two alternating- 
current dynamos, a rotary converter, transformer, ammeters, 
voltmeters, wattmeters, rheostats, switches, etc., affording accom- 
modations for fifteen students in a section. 

Oak Hall. — North of Wingate Hall is Oak Hall, a substantial 
four-story brick building used as a dormitory for men. named in 
honor of Lyndon Oak of Garland, for many years a useful mem- 
ber of the board of trustees. It contains forty-nine study rooms 
for students, bath rooms, and a room occupied by the Young 
Men's Christian Association. It is heated by steam, supplied with 
water, and lighted by electricity. It was remodeled in 1895. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 21 

Fernald Hall. — This building, named in honor of Merritt C. 
Fernald, Ph. D., president of the University from 1879 to 1893, is 
a two-story brick building, situated south of Wingate Hall. It 
contains fifteen rooms devoted to the departments of chemistry 
and pharmacy. On the first floor are the quantitative and phar- 
maceutical laboratories, offices and private laboratories for the 
professors of chemistry and pharmacy ; upon the second floor are 
the lecture rooms, the qualitative laboratory, the office and pri- 
vate laboratory of the instructor in qualitative analysis, a store 
room, and a recitation room. Under the roof are arranged the 
photographic studio, laboratory, and dark rooms. In the base- 
ment is an assay laboratory, the laboratory for beginners, and 
store rooms. The department is well supplied with apparatus. 

Coburn Hall. — Directly south of Fernald Hall is Coburn 
Hall, named in honor of Abner Coburn of Skowhegan, the chief 
benefactor of the University. It is a brick building, three stories 
in height. On the first floor are located the reading room and 
the library, the laboratory and recitation room of the professor of 
agriculture, and the recitation room of the professor of English. 
On the second floor are the botanical and entomological labora- 
tories, and recitation rooms for the departments of biology, 
civics, and modern languages. Over the library is the museum, 
extending through two stories. The collections are large and 
constantly increasing. 

The Drill Hall and Gymnasium. — To the northeast of 
Coburn Hall stands the new Drill Hall and Gymnasium, erected 
in 1900, the largest, as well as the latest, addition to the univer- 
sity buildings. The front part contains on the ground floor the 
offices of the president, secretary, and cashier, a board room, 
two recitation rooms for the use of the military and mathe- 
matical departments, and the private office of the professor of 
mathematics ; the second floor contains the university chapel, 
with a large pipe organ in the choir gallery. In the basement of 
the drill hall proper are the base ball cage, bowling alleys, lockers 
for men and women, lavatories, rooms for storage, etc. The 
drill hall itself is 100 by 62 feet, and is encircled by a 9-foot run- 
ning track suspended from the roof. As a gymnasium it will 
be equipped with complete apparatus of the most approved kind. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

The Observatory. — The astronomical observatory stands upon 
a slight elevation to the east of Coburn Hall. The equatorial 
room is equipped with an eight-inch refractor of the best 
modern construction, with finding circles, driving-clock, filar 
micrometer and other accessories. In the transit-room is a 
Repsold vertical circle of two-inch aperture. These instru- 
ments, together with sextants, sidereal chronometer, etc., furnish 
excellent facilities for instruction in both descriptive and prac- 
tical astronomy. 

The Machine Shop. — In the rear of Fernald Hall is the 
machine shop, a wooden building 125 feet long and two stories 
high, containing the foundry, forge shop, carpenter shop, machine 
shop and tool room. The building is thoroughly equipped. An 
adjoining building, 30 by 57 feet, contains a one hundred horse 
power boiler, a fifty horse power Corliss engine, a fifteen horse 
power Otto gasoline engine, the dynamos and storage battery, 
which comprise the lighting plant. Students in the Electrical 
Engineering Course receive instruction in the care and running 
of this equipment. 

The Experiment Station Building. — South of the Machine 
Shop stands a two-story brick building with basement, which is 
occupied by the Agricultural Experiment Station. In the base- 
ment are rooms for the storage and preparation of samples for 
analysis, the calorimeter room, and the boiler room. On the 
ground floor are the chemists' office, the laboratories used in the 
analysis of foods and feeding stuffs, the nitrogen room, and the 
laboratory used in the analysis of fertilizers. On the second 
floor are the general office, the director's office, the bacterio- 
logical laboratory, the journal room, and a storage room for 
books and pamphlets. The building is heated by steam, sup- 
plied with gas and electricity, and thoroughly equipped with 
apparatus. 

The Horticultural Building. — East of the Experiment 
Station is the Horticultural Building, consisting of a head-house 
and three greenhouses. In the head-house are the office of the 
professor of horticulture, a work room, a seed storage room, 
a photographing room, the janitor's room, and a room used for 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 23 

storage. The main greenhouse, 20 feet by 100 feet, is devoted 
to the use of the Experiment Station, and to the instruction of 
students. A second structure, 20 feet by 80 feet, running parallel 
to the main greenhouse, is divided, one-half being used for grow- 
ing plants, and the remainder as a potting and storage room. 
The third greenhouse is designed for investigations in plant 
nutrition. In the south end of this house is the conservatory. 

The Dairy Building. — The Dairy Building, 50 feet by 42 
feet, contains a milk room, a butter room, a cheese room, a cold 
storage room, a cheese curing room, a lecture room, the office of 
the professor of animal industry, and a laboratory. It is supplied 
with all necessary appliances for teaching the most approved 
methods of handling milk, cream, butter, and cheese. The build- 
ing is heated with steam and supplied with hot and cold water. 
Power is furnished by a six horse power engine. 

The Mt. Vernon House. — This is a wooden building, com- 
pleted in 1898, to furnish dormitory accommodations for women. 
It is at present occupied in part by members of the faculty, 
but will be entirely devoted to women, whenever the numbers 
demand it. The house is situated near the recitation and labora- 
tory buildings, upon a site overlooking the campus, and com- 
manding a magnificent view of the river, villages, and mountains. 
It is two stories in height, built in the old colonial style and 
consists of a long central portion and two wings. It contains 
a parlor, the rooms of the University Guild, dining room, 
kitchen, bath room, and sixteen study rooms, each intended 
for two students. The rooms are large, well lighted, 
heated by a combined system of hot air and hot water, and 
provided with electric lights from the university plant. A spe- 
cial feature is the long hall on each floor, extending sixty-six feet 
upon the front of the building, and wide enough to serve as an 
assembly or study room. The building, and the students who 
live in it, are under the supervision of a competent matron. 

The Fraternity Houses. — Four of the student fraternities 
occupy club houses. Three of the houses are on the campus, and 
one in the village of Orono. They are large, well arranged 
houses, affording rooms for about twenty-five students each. 
Three of the fraternities maintain their own boarding establish- 
ments under the supervision of matrons. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Other Buildings. — In addition to the buildings already 
described, there are six others devoted to various purposes. 
Among these are the President's house, the Commons or gen- 
eral boarding house, and three residences occupied by members 
of the faculty. 

The Athletic Field. — Alumni Field, so called because funds 
required for its construction were contributed by the Alumni 
Association, is located at the northwestern extremity of the 
campus, about 1,200 feet from the Gymnasium. It contains a 
quarter-mile cinder track, with a 220 yards straightaway, and is 
graded and laid out for foot ball, base ball, and field athletics. 



THE LIBRARY 



The library is located in Coburn Hall. It contains over 
eighteen thousand bound volumes and seventy-five hundred 
pamphlets. Some fifteen hundred volumes of special value to 
the Experiment Station are kept in the Station building, and 
twenty-five hundred law books in the rooms of the School of 
Law. Books needed for constant reference by various depart- 
ments are kept in the departmental rooms. 

Nearly half of the volumes in the library have been added 
during the last three years, and the greater portion of them have 
been selected by the heads of departments with special reference 
to the desirability of making the library of the greatest possible 
working value. Its importance for general reference is also kept 
in view. 

The library is classified according to the Dewey system, 
slightly modified ; there is a card catalogue, both author and 
subject ; the shelves are open to all. Students may borrow two 
volumes at a time, to be retained two weeks, when they may be 
renewed unless previously called for ; a larger number may be 
obtained in special cases upon application to the librarian; there 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 25 

is a fine of two cents a day for books kept over time. Officers 
and alumni of the University may borrow any reasonable num- 
ber of volumes without time limit except that all books must be 
returned at least nine days before Commencement, and the 
return of any volume at any time may be required by the library 
committee. Other suitable persons may obtain the privileges of 
the library upon application. Help may always be obtained by 
those who need it from the librarian and the assistants. 

The library is a designated depository for the publications of 
of the United States Congress, and also receives publications of 
different departments not included in the depository set. All the 
publications of the State of Maine are received. About three 
hundred of the most important literary, scientific and technical 
periodicals, both American and foreign, are regularly received. 
The leading papers of Maine, together with a selected list of 
daily papers published in the large cities, are on file. 

The library is open daily from 8 A. M. to 12.00 M., and from 
1.30 to 5.30 P. M., Sundays and legal holidays excepted. 



MUSEUM AND HERBARIUM 



The museum is located in two stories of the wing of Coburn 
Hall. In the upper siory are exhibited the mineral collection, 
geological specimens and plant models. The mineral cabinet 
embraces a general collection of three hundred species of the 
more common minerals, arranged for study according to Dana's 
system. A fine collection of economic minerals has been received 
from the National Museum, and an educational series of rocks, 
from the U. S. Geological Survey. The geological cabinet 
embraces a collection of plant and animal fossils, and a collection 
of the more important fragmental, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. 

On the lower floor are collections of the vertebrate and inverte- 
brate animals, and a set of animal models. The invertebrates 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

include working collections and interesting native and exotic 
exhibition specimens of sponges, hydroids, corals, echinoderms, 
vermes, mollusks, crustaceans, and insects. The vertebrates 
include the nucleus of a collection of the fishes, reptiles, birds, 
and mammals of the State, and a set of type exotic mammals. 
The herbarium comprises the original collection of Maine 
plants of about 500 species ; the new collection of Maine plants of 
800 species ; the Blake herbarium of 7,000 species, including 
phsenogams and cryptogams ; Ellis and Everhard's North Ameri- 
can Fungi, comprising thirty-five centuries ; Halsted's Lichens of 
New England; Underwood's Hepaticae; Cummings and Sey- 
mour's North American Lichens ; Cook's Illustrative Fungi ; 
Collins's Algae of the Maine Coast; a collection of illustrative 
cryptogams in boxes ; Harvey's Weeds and Forage Plants of 
Maine, 300 species ; Halsted's Weeds ; a collection of grasses 
and forage plants of 400 species; a collection of United States 
woods prepared by the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture ; a collection of seeds and fruits ; numerous slides for the 
microscope. 



ORGANIZATIONS 



Fraternities. — The following fraternities are represented in 
the University : <t> V A, B0n,K2, ATfi, $K2, AP,I$, * r 
(for women). 

Associations. — The following is a list of other organizations 
existing in the University : Scientific Association, Philological 
Club, French Club, University Guild, Debating Society, Elec- 
trical Society, Honorary Society (Phi Kappa Phi), Young Men's 
Christian Association, Athletic Association, Publishing Asso- 
ciation, Press Club, Glee Club, Instrumental Club, Orchestra, 
Band, Photographic Society. 

The Scientific Association. — The Scientific Association was 
organized to promote interest in scientific study and investiga- 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 27 

tion in various departments. It holds a general meeting once a 
month, and is divided into four groups, each of which has its 
own stated meetings. Papers describing original work, and 
those of a more popular nature, are presented from time to time. 

The Philological Club. — The Philological Club meets on the 
first Thursday evening of each month except January, during the 
academic year, for the presentation and discussion of original 
papers on philological and literary subjects. 

The University Guild. — The University Guild has for its 
object the building up of an art collection, and the promotion of a 
general interest, among the faculty, students, and friends of the 
University, in the study of the fine arts. The Guild occupies 
rooms in Mt. Vernon House, and holds monthly meetings from 
October till May. As rapidly as funds may permit, casts and 
photographs of celebrated works of art will be added to the 
collection already begun. 

The course in the history of Italian painting, given in 1900- 
1901, is open to members of the Guild. 

Phi Kappa Phi. — The Phi Kappa Phi is an honorary society. 
At the end of the junior year the five members of the class hav- 
ing the highest standing are elected members, and at the end of 
the fall term of the senior year the five next highest are added. 

The Young Men's Christian Association. — The Young 
Men's Christian Association, composed of students, has for its 
object the promotion of Christian fellowship and aggressive 
Christian work. 



UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 



The Annual Catalogue of the University of Maine. — 
This contains descriptions of the courses of study, lists of the 
trustees, faculty, and students, and other information relating to 
the University. 



28 university of maine 

The Short Catalogue of the University of Maine. — 
This is an abbreviated form of the catalogue. 

The Annual Report of the Trustees, President, and 
Treasurer, to the Governor and Council of the State. — 
The reports of the trustees and president include an account of 
the general affairs and interests of the University for the year, 
and the report of the Experiment Station. The report for the 
odd years contains the biennial catalogue of graduates. 

The University of Maine Studies. — These are occasional 
publications containing reports of investigations or researches 
made by university officers or alumni. 

The University Circulars. — These are occasional pamphlets, 
issued for special purposes. Those now ready for distribution 
relate to : the Courses in Agriculture ; the Courses in Phar- 
macy ; the School of Law ; the Courses in Engineering ; Student 
Expenses. 

The Maine Bulletin. — This is a small publication issued 
quarterly by the University, to give information to the alumni. 

The Annual Report of the Experiment Station. — 
This is Part II. of the Annual Report of the University. 

The Experiment Station Bulletins. — These are popular 
accounts of the results of station work which relate directly to 
farm practice. 

The Campus. — This is a journal published semi-monthly dur- 
ing the university year by an association of the students. 

The Prism. — This is an illustrated annual, published by the 
junior class. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 29 



MILITARY INSTRUCTION 



Military instruction is required by law. The department is 
under the charge of an officer of the regular army, detailed by 
the President of the United States for this purpose. Cadet rifles, 
ammunition, and accoutrements are furnished by the War 
Department. The course has special reference to the duties of 
officers of the line. The students are organized into an infantry 
battalion of four companies, an artillery company, band, and sig- 
nal corps, officered by cadets selected for character, soldierly 
bearing, and military efficiency. The corps is instructed and 
disciplined in accordance with rules established by the President 
of the United States. 

The trustees have prescribed a uniform consisting of dark blue 
blouse, with State of Maine buttons, and gold braid on the cuffs ; 
light blue cloth trousers for cold weather, and white duck 
trousers for hot weather ; blue cap with gold wreath ornament. 
Students are required to wear their uniforms during military 
exercises, and are allowed to do so at other times. Students 
must purchase uniforms subject to the approval of the military 
instructor, who is required to see that the quality and fit are 
satisfactory. The prices for the year ending November 30, 1898, 
were as follows: blouse $7.00; cloth trousers $5.00; three pairs 
of duck trousers $3.00; cap $1.50; three pairs of gloves 60c; 
three belts 30c. ; total, $17.40. 

The three seniors who attain the highest standing in the 
military department are reported to the Adjutant General of the 
U. S. Army, and their names are printed in the U. S. Army 
Register. Cadets who have satisfactorily completed the course 
in military science receive at graduation a certificate of military 
proficiency and are reported to the Adjutant General of Maine. 

Service in the military department is optional for members of 
the senior and junior classes that have not received appointments 
as officers. 



3D UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



PUBLIC WORSHIP 



Religious services of a simple character are held in the chapel 
every day except Saturday and Sunday. All undergraduate stu- 
dents are required to be present. Students receive a cordial wel- 
come at all services in the churches of the village. Voluntary 
religious services, under the direction of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, are held weekly. 



FIELD DAY 



One day in each year is known as the Field Day of the agricul- 
tural departments. The usual exercises are omitted and all 
departments are thrown open to visitors. Special effort is made 
to exhibit the facilities of the agricultural departments in the 
most thorough manner. Special rates are obtained on the rail- 
road for those who come from a distance. The attendance has 
ranged from twelve hundred to seventeen hundred persons. The 
program includes informal addresses by members of the faculty 
in regard to the collections, demonstrations with some of the 
more important apparatus, exhibitions of improved agricultural 
machinery, the operation of the dairy apparatus, an exhibit of 
agricultural products, tools and supplies contributed by manu- 
facturers and dealers. The experimental work of the Experi- 
ment Station is explained by the investigators. The students 
give an exhibition drill. 

Circulars in regard to Field Day may be obtained by address- 
ing the professor of agriculture. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 31 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 



The regulations in regard to the selection of studies, standings 
and grades, absences from recitations and examinations, rhetori- 
cal exercises, entrance conditions, leave of absence, attendance 
upon chapel, penalties, examinations, and athletics, are printed 
in a small pamphlet, which may be obtained from the secretary. 

By these regulations, the quota of regular studies for each 
student is, for a minimum, fifteen hours, and, for a maxi- 
mum, twenty hours of class room work each week. In the appli- 
cation of this rule, two hours of laboratory work, or of other 
exercises not requiring preparation, count as one hour. 

Excuses for absence from individual exercises are not required. 
Each student is expected to be present at all recitations and other 
exercises except when imperative reasons require absence. Of 
these reasons he is the judge, but a student who is absent from 
ten per cent, or more of the exercises in any study is not 
admitted to the final examination. A student who fails to pass 
at an examination, is absent from an examination, or is excluded 
from an examination, may make up his deficiency at the special 
examinations held at the times noted in the calendar. The 
arrearage examinations during the Christmas recess include only 
studies of the spring term ; the examinations during the Easter 
recess include only studies of the fall term ; the examinations at 
the beginning of the fall term include studies of the whole year. 
A student who fails to make up an arrearage before the study is 
again taken in class is required to attend recitations in that 
study. 

Each student is given a report of his work shortly after the 
close of each term. Parents or guardians may obtain these 
reports from the secretary upon application. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 



Honors for scholarship are of two kinds, general and special. 
General honors are awarded, at graduation, to students who 
attain an average standing, after the freshman year, of ninety on 
a scale of one hundred. Special honors are granted for the satis- 
factory completion of an honor course in addition to the work 
required for a degree. An honor course must involve at least 
ninety recitations or an equivalent. The methods of work are 
determined by the instructor. The list of honor courses, with 
full description, is published by the secretary of the faculty four 
weeks before Commencement. Honor courses are open to 
juniors and seniors who have attained an average standing of 
eighty per cent, in all previous work, and an average standing 
of ninety per cent, in the previous work of the department in 
which the honors are sought. A student cannot register for an 
honor course without the consent of the faculty, nor later than 
the fourth week of the fall term. Upon completion of a course, 
the student's work will be tested by an examination or thesis, 
or both, under the direction of the faculty committee on honor 
courses, and the result, together with the instructor's report, will 
be laid before the faculty. The faculty may grant special honors 
to those students who receive the approval of the committee, but 
will not dt> so if th* general work is unsatisfactory. Honors, 
and their nature, are stated upon the Commencement program 
and published in the annual catalogue. 



DEGREES 



The degree of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) is conferred upon 
students that complete the Classical Course. 

The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy (B. Ph.) is conferred 
upon students that complete the Latin-Scientific Course. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 33 

The degree of Bachelor of Science (B. S.) is conferred upon 
students that complete the Scientific, Chemical, Preparatory 
Medical, Agricultural, Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, Electrical Engineering, or Pharmacy Course. The diploma 
indicates which course has been completed. 

The degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph. C.) is conferred 
upon students that complete the Short Pharmacy Course. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL. B.) is conferred upon 
students that complete the Law Course. 

Advanced Degrees 

For receiving an advanced degree the required preparation 
must include the attainment of the proper first degree. 

The Master's degrees, viz., Master of Arts (M. A.), Master 
of Philosophy (M. Ph.), Master of Science (M. S.), and Master 
of Laws (LL. M.), are conferred upon holders of the corres- 
ponding Bachelor's degrees under either of the following 
conditions : 

(i) One year's work in residence, including examinations on 
a prescribed course of study, and the presentation of a satisfac- 
tory thesis. The course for each candidate must be approved by 
the committee on advanced degrees not later than the first week 
in October. A registration fee of $10.00 is charged. 

(2) Two years' work in absence, with examinations at the 
University, the other conditions as in (1). 

The professional degrees of Civil Engineer (C. E.), Mechan- 
ical Engineer (M.*E.), and Electrical Engineer (E. E.), may be 
conferred upon graduates of the Civil Engineering, Mechanical 
Engineering, and Electrical Engineering Courses respectively on 
the presentation of a satisfactory thesis after at least three years 
of professional work subsequent to graduation. 



STUDENT EXPENSES 



Many students go through college with an annual expenditure 
of little more than $200, exclusive of the expense of clothing, 
traveling and vacations, and very many earn a part of this sum 
by vacation work. An estimate of the necessary annual expenses 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

of a student in any department, except the School of Law, may 
be made from the following table. For the expenses of students 
in the School of Law reference is made to the article on that 
School. It should be noticed that clothing, traveling, vacation, 
society and personal expenses are not included in the table. 
These vary according to individual tastes and habits. The table 
is made up for men students who room in Oak Hall, and board 
at the Commons. The necessary expenses of other students are 
sometimes lower, but usually slightly higher. In all cases an 
allowance must be made for personal incidental expenses. The 
expenses of the first year are higher than those of later years. 

Annual Student Expenses 

Tuition, 2 terms at $15.00, $30 00 

Registration fee, 2 terms at $5.00, 10 00 

Incidentals, 2 terms at $10.00, 20 00 

Laboratory fees, average, about, 8 00 

Text-books, about, 15 00 

Board, 34 weeks at $3.00, 102 00 

Heat and light for half room, and general care 

of dormitory, about, 15 00 

Total $200 00 

The tuition charge is $15.00 a term, or $30.00 a year, and all 
students are subject to this charge except those in the short 
winter courses in agriculture, for which no tuition charge is 
made. Residents of Maine who need assistance and maintain a 
good record may obtain, from the University, loans to cover 
the tuition charge. The regulations ii; regard to these loans are 
stated in the article on loans. 

The registration fee of $5.00 must be paid at the beginning of 
each term before the student enters any classes. 

The incidental fee is $10.00 a term, or $20.00 a year, and covers 
heat and light for public buildings, reading-room charges, care 
of public rooms, and miscellaneous expenses. 

The cost of text-books will average about $15.00 a year for 
the course. These may be bought from the librarian at cost, 
but must be paid for on delivery. The expense may be decreased 
by buying second-hand books and selling them after using them. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 35 

Students in the laboratories and shops pay a charge to cover 
cost of materials and maintenance. These charges are as 
follows: — botany, per term, $1.00; chemistry, per term, about 
$3.00 ; bacteriology, per course, $3.00 ; physics, per course, $2.00 
to $4.00; pharmacy, per term, about $3.50; mineralogy, $2.00; 
biology, per course, $2.00; electrical engineering, per course, 
$2.50 ; shop, per course, $5.00. Laboratory charges in the civil 
engineering course are very few, but traveling expenses incurred 
in visiting engineering works will be nearly equivalent to the 
laboratory expenses of other courses. 

The largest item of expense is for board. At the Commons, 
the university boarding house, each student pays his share of the 
cost, varying from $2.75 to $3.00 a week. Board may be obtained 
in clubs or private families at prices ranging from $2.50 to $3.25 
•a week. 

Rooms in Oak Hall, the men's dormitory, are free; but, students 
supply their own furniture, and pay for heat and light, for the 
lighting and care of the halls and public rooms of the dormitory, 
and for damages. This charge may be expected to be about 
$15.00 a year for each student, when two occupy a room. Fur- 
nished rooms, with light and heat, may be obtained in the village 
for $1.50 a week if occupied by one person, or $2.00 a week if 
occupied by two persons. 

The estimate for furniture is made on the assumption that two 
students will unite in furnishing a room, and that something will 
be realized from the sale of furniture upon graduation. 

Women students who do not live at their own homes are 
required to room and board at the Mt. Vernon House. The 
charge for board is $3.00 a week. No charge is made for the 
rent of rooms ; but students provide their own furniture, take 
care of their rooms, pay for the heat and light of their rooms, 
and for the heat, light and care of the halls and public rooms. 
The charge for all these items is at cost. Students are charged 
for all damages done to university property or to that of other 
students. 

Each student is required to deposit with the treasurer a bond, 
with two good names as sureties, in the amount of $150.00, to 
cover term bills. Blanks on which bonds should be made out 
will be furnished by the secretary upon application. Those who 
keep a sufficient deposit with the treasurer to cover the bills 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

of one term will not be required to furnish a bond. The deposit 
required is $90.00 from those who board at the Commons or 
Mt. Vernon House, and $30.00 from others. No student will be 
graduated who is in debt to the treasury. 

A circular containing a fuller statement in regard to expenses, 
and treating of the opportunities for self help, may be obtained 
upon application. 



LOANS 



Tuition Loans 

Residents of Maine who need assistance and maintain a satis- 
factory record may borrow from the university treasury a sum 
sufficient to pay the tuition charge. This privilege is not 
extended to students in the School of Law. 

Borrowers are required to give endorsed notes or other satis- 
factory security. The loans bear interest at six per cent, per 
annum, and are due $50.00 a year, beginning with the first year 
after graduation, but may be paid earlier. No member of the 
faculty is accepted as an endorser. 

Loans are granted by a committee consisting of the president 
and two other members of the faculty. The number of loans 
may not exceed one-third of the number of students in the 
undergraduate departments. Loans are granted to cover the 
tuition charges of one year at a time. 

The first grant of loans for each university year is made in 
June preceding. Applications for loans are considered during 
May, and to insure attention at this time should be forwarded 
to the President not later than May 15. A second award is 
made in the fall term. Applications should be made not later 
than October 10. They must be made to the President upon 
blanks to be obtained from the Secretary of the faculty. Awards 
made in June may be withdrawn from students who do not reg- 
ister, or claim their loans, by October 10. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 37 



The Kittredge Loan Fund 
This fund, amounting to nearly one thousand dollars, was 
established by Nehemiah Kittredge of Bangor. It is in the 
control of the president and treasurer of the University, by 
whom it is loaned to needy students. In the deed of ;ift it was 
prescribed that no security but personal notes bearing interest at 
the prevailing rate should be required. Loans are made on the 
conditions that the interest shall be paid promptly, and that the 
principal shall be returned from the first earnings after grad- 
uation. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 



The Kidder Scholarship. — The Kidder Scholarship was 
endowed by Frank E. Kidder, Ph. D., Denver, Colorado, a grad- 
uate of the University in the class of 1879, to be awarded to a 
member of the junior class to be selected by the President and 
the Faculty. 

The Junior Exhibition Prize will be awarded to that member 
of the junior class who shall present the best oration at the 
junior exhibition. In the award of this prize both the compo- 
sition and the delivery of the oration will be considered. 

The Sophomore Declamation Prize, for excellence in elocu- 
tion, will be awarded to the best speaker in the sophomore class. 

The Libbey Prize, the gift of the Hon. Samuel Libbey, 
Orono, will be awarded to the student who shall present the best 
essay upon an agricultural topic. The essays must be handed 
to the professor of agriculture on or before the first Monday in 
June. 

The Walter Balentine Prize, the gift of Whitman H. 
Jordan, Sc. D., Geneva, N. Y., a graduate of the University in 
the class of 1875, will be awarded to that member of the junior 
class who shall excel in biological chemistry. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

The Kennebec County Prize, the gift of the Hon. William 
T. Haines, Waterville, a graduate of the University in the class 
of 1876, will be awarded to that member of the senior class who 
shall write the best essay on applied electricity. 

The Franklin Danforth Prize, the gift of the Hon. Edward 
F. Danforth, Skowhegan, a graduate of the University in the 
class of 1877, in memory of his father, Franklin Danforth, will 
be awarded to that member of the senior class in the agricul- 
tural course who shall attain the highest standing. 

The Pharmacy Prize will be awarded to that student in the 
Pharmacy Department who shall attain the highest standing in 
chemistry in the last year of his course. 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL IN ROME 

Graduates of this University, which is one of the institutions 
co-operating with the American School of Classical Studies 
in Rome, are entitled to free tuition in that school. The 
school awards annually to Bachelors of Arts, chiefly on the basis 
of competitive examination, two fellowships in Roman Classical 
Archaeology, each with a stipend of $600.00, and one in Christian 
Archaeology, with a stipend of $500.00. 



ADMISSION 



Applicants for admission must pass the required examinations, 
or present satisfactory certificates of fitness, and file with the 
Treasurer a bond for $150 signed by two bondsmen, as security 
for the payment of term bills. A cash deposit covering the bills 
of one term will be accepted in place of a bond. In the School 
of Law the fees must be paid in advance, and no bond or deposit 
is required. The University admits men and women, both resi- 
dents of Maine and non-residents. 

Candidates for advanced standing are examined in the prepar- 
atory studies, and in those previously pursued by the classes they 
propose to enter, or in other equivalent studies. Certificates will 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 39 

be accepted for the preparatory work, but not for any part of 
the college work, unless done in a college. A student who has 
accomplished half of the preparatory course may be examined on 
that part, and receive credit therefor. 

The attention of students preparing for the entrance examina- 
tions is called to the need of careful work in mathematics. 
A good preparation in algebra and geometry is most important 
for those who expect to enter engineering courses. The schools 
should give a part of the work in algebra and geometry, or a 
review of these subjects, during the last year. 

Students preparing for the Classical or Latin-Scientific courses 
should devote special attention to Latin composition, Roman his- 
tory, and constant practice in pronouncing Latin according to the 
Roman method. 

Persons, not candidates for a degree, who wish to take special 
studies, will be permitted to do so upon giving satisfactory evi- 
dence that they are prepared to take the desired studies. If they 
subsequently desire to become candidates for a degree, or to take 
a regular course, they will be required to pass the entrance exam- 
inations. 

No examinations are required for admission to the short winter 
courses. 

College graduates who wish to enter a technical course will 
be admitted to the junior class without examination. Students 
in general college courses, who expect to pursue technical 
courses after graduation, should avail themselves of opportunities 
for the study of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and drawing, 
as a preparation for engineering courses ; and of physics, chem- 
istry, and drawing, for chemical and biological courses. 

Admission to the School of Law 

Graduates of a college, or of a preparatory school of good 
standing, will be admitted without examination. Other appli- 
cants must give satisfactory evidence of the necessary qualifica- 
tions. These are fixed in each case on a consideration of its 
merits. 

Students from other law schools of good standing will be 
admitted to the appropriate classes in this school upon certifi- 
cate. Students from law offices are admitted to advanced stand- 
ing after passing a satisfactory examination upon the earlier sub- 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

jects of the course. Members of the bar of any State are admit- 
ted to tiie senior class without examination. 

Special students, not candidates for a degree, are admitted 
without examination. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations are held at Orono, beginning on the day before 
the opening of each term, and on the day after Commencement. 
Examinations will be held, if desired, in each county of the State. 
These examinations are held on the day after Commencement, 
and persons desiring examinations at such places must notify 
the President not later than June i. 

To save expense to candidates, examination papers will be sent 
to any satisfactory person who will consent to conduct an exam- 
ination. The questions are to be submitted under the usual 
restrictions of a written examination, and the answers returned 
to the University accompanied by the indorsement of the exam- 
iner. Applications for such examinations must be made out on 
blanks to be obtained from the secretary of the faculty. 

Candidates for the Classical Course are examined on — Lan- 
guage, English, Latin, Greek, and either French or German; 
History, Roman, Greek; Mathematics, Plane Geometry, Algebra. 

Candidates for the Latin- Scientific Course are examined 
on — Language, English, Latin, and either French or German ; 
History, Roman ; Mathematics, Plane Geometry, Algebra. 

Candidates for the Scientific Course are examined on — 
Language, English, and one year of a foreign language, either 
ancient or modern ; History, One of the following, — General, 
Roman, Greek, English ; Mathematics, Plane Geometry, Alge- 
bra ; Science, Two of the following, — Botany, Chemistry, Physi- 
cal Geography, Physics. 

Candidates for the Chemical, Agricultural (four years), 
Preparatory Medical, and Pharmacy (four years) Courses 
are examined on — Language, English, and one year of a foreign 
language, either ancient or modern ; Mathematics, Plane Geom- 
etry, Algebra ; Science, Two of the following, — Botany, Chem- 
istry, Physical Geography, Physics. 

Candidates for the Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engi- 
neering, and Electrical Engineering Courses are examined 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 41 

on — Language, English, and one year of a foreign language, 
either ancient or modern ; Mathematics, Plane and Solid Geome- 
try, Algebra; Science, Two of the following, — Botany, Chem- 
istry, Physical Geography, Physics. 

Candidates for Short Courses in Agriculture (one year or 
more) are examined on — Elementary Subjects, Arithmetic, Eng- 
lish Grammar, Physiology ; Language, English ; History, United 
States ; Mathematics, Algebra through simple equations of the 
first degree; Science, One of the following, — Botany, Chemistry, 
Physical Geography, Physics. 

Candidates for the Short Course in Pharmacy (two years) 
are examined on — Elementary Subjects, Descriptive Geography, 
Arithmetic, English Grammar, Physiology; History, United 
States ; Mathematics, Algebra through simple equations of the 
first degree. 

Substitutes. — One year of Latin will be accepted as a substi- 
tute for any one of the following groups : (a) Geography, Arith- 
metic, English Grammar, and Physiology ; (b) French or Ger- 
man ; (c) One science. 

One year of French or German will be accepted as a substitute 
for either of the following groups: (a) Geography, Arithmetic, 
English Grammar, Physiology ; (b) One science. 

Other equivalents 'will be accepted for any of the requirements 
•except Mathematics, Latin, or Greek. 

In consideration of the recent addition of one year of a foreign 
language, and of solid geometry, to the requirements, students 
who are not able to offer these subjects, but are otherwise pre- 
pared, will be admitted without them, and allowed to make them 
up after admission. This privilege will be withdrawn after 1902. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The stars indicate the studies required. 
For requirements of the School of Law see the article on School of Law, page 118 



College of 


arts and Sciences 


Agricul- 
ture 


Engineer- 
ing 


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* 
*d 


* 
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Greek 

History: 








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Roman 


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Mathematics: 
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Science: a 


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Physical Geog.... j 
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o-One year of a foreign language, ancient or modern, will be accepted as a sub- 
stitute for all the elementary studies, or for one science. 6-English grammar 
only. c-One year of French or German, d— One year of a foreign language, either 
ancient or modern. In consideration of the recent addition of this requirement, 
candidates who cannot satisfy it, but are otherwise well prepared, will be allowed 
to make it up as an extra study after admission. This privilege will be discon- 
tinued after 1902. e-One from general, Roman, Greek, or English history. /-See 
page 41. <7-Through simple equations of the first degree only, ft— Two sciences, 
from the list of four, are required. i-One science, from the list of four, is required 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 43 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The following statements will show in detail the requirements 
in each subject. 

Language 

English. — Grammar. The usual school course. Attention 
should be given to punctuation and the use of capital letters. 

Reading and Practice. Each candidate will be required to pre- 
sent evidence of a general knowledge of the substance of the 
books mentioned below and to answer simple questions on the 
lives of their authors. The examination will usually be the writ- 
ing of one or two paragraphs on each of several topics. The 
treatment of these topics is designed to test the power of clear 
and accurate expression, and will call for only a general knowl- 
edge of the substance of the books. In place of this test the 
candidate may present an exercise book, certified by his instruc- 
tor, containing compositions or other written work done in con- 
nection with the reading of the books. 

In igoi and 1902 this part of the examination will be based 
upon: Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; Pope's Iliad, books 
I, VI, XXII, and XXIV ; the Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in 
the Spectator; Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's 
The Ancient Mariner ; Scott's Ivanhoe : Cooper's The Last of the 
Mohicans ; Tennyson's The Princess ; Lowell's The Vision of Sir 
Launfal ; George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

In 1903, 1904, and 1905. it will be based upon : Shakespeare's 
Merchant of Venice and Julius Caesar; the Sir Roger de Cover- 
ley Papers in the Spectator; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; 
Coleridge's Ancient Mariner ; Scott's Ivanhoe ; Carlyle's Essay 
on Burns; Tennyson's Princess; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; 
George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

Study and Practice. This part of the examination presup- 
poses a careful study of the works named below. The examina- 
tion will be upon subject-matter, form, and structure; and will 
also test the candidate's ability to express his knowledge with 
clearness and accuracy. 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

In 1901 and 1902, this part of the examination will be based 
upon: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's L'Allegro, II Pense- 
roso, Comus, and Lycidas ; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with 
America ; Macauiay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

In 1903, 1904, and 1905, it will be based upon : Shakespeare's 
Macbeth ; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, L'Allegro, and II Penseroso ; 
Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America ; Macauiay's 
Essays on Milton and on Addison. 

French. — The candidate offering French must have an 
accurate knowledge of the grammar, especially of the regular 
and irregular verbs ; an elementary knowledge of French compo- 
sition ; the ability to read at sight moderately difficult French 
prose. 

German. — The candidate offering German must have an 
accurate knowledge of the grammar ; an elementary knowledge 
of German composition ; the ability to read at sight moderately 
difficult German prose. 

Latin. — The grammar, including prosody ; Caesar's Gallic 
War, books I-IV; Cicero's four orations against Catiline, and 
those for Archias and for the Manilian Law; Vergil's Eclogues 
and the y£neid, books I-VI ; the sight tranlation of Latin pas- 
sages of moderate difficulty ; the translation into Latin of simple 
English sentences, and of easy narrative passages based on the 
prose authors read. For the last, a vocabulary of unusual words 
will be furnished. Equivalent readings will be accepted for those 
prescribed. 

Greek. — The grammar, including prosody ; Xenophon's Anab- 
asis, books I-IV; Homer's Iliad, books I-III ; the sight transla- 
tion of easy passages from Xenophon ; the translation into Greek 
of easy passages based on the required books of the Anabasis. 
For the last, a vocabulary of unusual words will be furnished. 
Equivalent readings will be accepted. 



History 

General History. — A knowledge such as may be obtained 
from Myers's General History. 

Roman History. — A knowledge such as may be obtained from 
Allen's Short History of the Roman People, or from Myers's 
Rome: Its Rise and Fall, to the death of Marcus Aurelius. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 45 

Greek History. — Pennell's, or Myers's, History of Greece, to 
the capture of Corinth, 146 B. C. 

English History. — A knowledge such as may be obtained 
from Montgomery's History of England. 

United States History. — A knowledge such as may be 
obtained from Higginson's History of the United States. 

Mathematics 

Plane Geometry. — The first five books of Wells's, or Went- 
worth's Geometry, or an equivalent. Numerical exercises, orig- 
inal propositions and the neat and careful construction of figures 
should not be neglected. The examination will include some 
original propositions for demonstration or construction. 

Solid Geometry. — Books VI-IX of Wells's, or books VI-VIII 
of Wentworth's, Geometry, or an equivalent. The examination 
will be planned to test the candidate's ability to apply the 
theorems to the computation of surfaces and volumes, as well as 
readiness in demonstration. Required only of candidates for the 
engineering courses. 

As this is a new requirement, and is not taught in all prepar- 
atory schools, students who cannot offer it, but are otherwise well 
prepared, will be allowed to take it as an extra study after admis- 
sion. This privilege will be withdrawn after 1902. 

Algebra. — The elements, equations of the first degree, radi- 
cals, the theory of exponents, quadratic equations, ratio and pro- 
portion, arithmetical and geometrical progression, the binomial 
theorem. Candidates for special courses in agriculture or for the 
short course in pharmacy will be examined on no topics beyond 
simple equations of the first degree. A satisfactory preparation 
may be obtained from Newcomb's, Wells's Academic, or Went- 
worth's School Algebra. 

Science 

Botany. — An elementary course which will bring the student 
into contact with plants. Gray's Lessons in Botany, Spaulding's 
Introduction to Botany, or Bergen's Elements of Botany, will 
serve as a satisfactory guide. 

Chemistry. — The necessary ground is covered by the follow- 
ing text-books : Fisher, Remsen, Roscoe (inorganic part), Shep- 
ard. Storer and Lindsav, Williams. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Physical Geography. — A satisfactory preparation may be 
obtained from Appleton's Physical Geography. 

Physics. — A satisfactory treatment of this subject may be 
found in Avery's, or Gage's Physics. 



Elementary Subjects 

Descriptive Geography. — The usual school course. Required 
for short course in pharmacy only. 

Arithmetic. — The usual school course, including the metric 
system of weights and measures. Required for the short courses 
only. 

Physiology. — Cells and tissues, skeleton, muscles, blood and 
circulation, respiration, nutrition and digestion, lymphatic system, 
excretory organs, nervous system, special senses, hygiene. Re- 
quired for the short courses only. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



47 



ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Any preparatory school whose course of instruction covers in 
a satisfactory manner the requirements for admission may be 
placed upon the list of approved schools. Application for such 
approval should be made to the President of the University, and 
must be accompanied by a detailed statement of the course of 
study. 

Certificates for admission to the freshman class are accepted 
from graduates of approved schools, but will not be accepted 
from non-graduates except in extraordinary cases, and then only 
provided the candidate is expressly recommended for admission 
by the principal of the. school from which he comes. Certificates 
must be made out on blanks furnished by the University. 



APPROVED SCHOOLS 

Athol (Mass.) High School. 

Bangor High School, 

Bar Harbor High School, 

Bath High School, 

Belfast High School, 

Berwick Academy, South Berwick, 

Biddeford High School, 

Bowdoinham High School, 

Boynton High School, Eastport, 

Brewer High School, 

Bridge Academy, Dresden Mills, 

Bridgton Academy, North Bridgton, 

Bridgton High School, 

Bristol Academy, Taunton, Mass., 

Brunswick High School, 



Principal 

F. C. Avery. 

Henry K. White, M. A. 

Prescott Keyes, Jr., B. C. E. 

H. E. Cole, M. A. 

W. R. Howard, B. S. 

F. Stanley Stebbins, B. A. 

Harry H. Burnham, M. A. 

R. F. Springer. 

John B. Merrill, M. A. 

Harlan M. Bisbee, B. A. 

Leslie A. Bailey, M. A. 

C. C. Spratt, B. A. 

Charles Stone, B. A. 

Alfred B. Maggs, M. A. 

Charles Fish, M. A. 



4S 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Calais High School, 

Caribou High School, 

Cherryfield Academy, 

Coburn Classical Institute, Waterville, 

Cony High School, Augusta, 

Cornish High School, 

Corinna Union Academy, 

Danforth High School, 

Deering High School, 

Dexter High School, 

East Corinth Academ) r , 



Herbert S. Philbrick, M. A. 

W. P. Hamilton, B. A. 

Benjamin Coffin, B. A. 

F. W. Johnson, M. A. 

C. F. Cook, B. A. 

Stephen Rounds, B. A. 

W. Francis Miner, B. A. 

Varney A. Putnam. 

William M. Marvin, B. A. 

W. S. Brown, B. A. 

Francis E. Russell, M. A. 



East Maine Conference Seminary, Bucksport, 

Simpson A. Bender, B. A., B. D. 



J. F. Moody, M. A. 

W. H. Dresser, B. A. 

Charles S. Jackson, B. S. 

Charles S. Jackson, B. S. 

Charles M. Pennell, B. A. 

F. C. Mitchell, B. S. 

Lyman K. Lee, B. A. 



Edward Little High School, Auburn 

Ellsworth High School, 

English High School, Lynn, Mass., 

English High School. Lynn, Mass., 

Farmington High School, 

Fort Fairfield High School, 

Foxcroft Academy, 

Framingham Academy and High School, Framingham Center, 

Mass., Alfred C. Fay, B. A 

Freeport High School, Will O. Hersey, B. A 

Gardiner High School, William L. Powers, M. A 

George Stevens Bluehill Academy, Bluehill, 

Albert D. True, B. A 
Gorham High School, 
Gould's Academy, Bethel, 
Greeley Institute, Cumberland Center 
Guilford High School, 
Hallowell High School, 
Hampden Academy, 



Leon O. Glover. 

F. E. Hanscom, M. A. 

Everett Peacock, B. A. 

George W. Snow, M. A. 

C. W. StowelL 

Leonard Ford, B. S. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



4Q. 



Hebron Academy, W. E. Sargent, M. A. 

Higgins Classical Institute, Charleston, H. Warren Foss, B. A. 
Hyde Park (Mass.) High School, Merle S. Getchell, M. A. 

Island Falls High School, San Lorenzo Merriman, B. A. 

Leavitt Institute, Turner Center, Leland A. Ross, B. A. 



Lewiston High School, 

Limerick Academy, 

Limington Academy, 

Lincoln Academy, Newcastle, 

Lisbon High School, 

Lisbon Falls High School, 

Lubec High School, 

Machias High School, 

Madison High School, 

Maine Central Institute, Pittsfield, 



G. H. Libby, B. A. 

William A. Hawthorne, B. A. 

Charles L. Orton, B. A. 

George H. Larrabee, M. A.. 

A. E. Linscott, B. A. 

Leander H. Moulton, M. A. 

Ascor C. Merrill, B. A. 

D. Lyman Wormwood, B. A. 

Edward M. Tucker, B. A. 

F. U. Landman, B. A. 



Maine Wesleyan Seminary and Female College, Kent's Hill, 

Henry E. Trefethen, M. A. 

Mechanic Falls High School, Alton C. Wheeler, B. A. 

Monmouth Academy. A. L. Dennison, B. A. 

Monson Academy, W. S. Knowlton. M. A. 

North Brookfield (Mass.) High School, C. N. Perkins, M. A.. 

North Yarmouth Academy, Yarmouth, Rev. B. P. Snow, M. A. 



Norway High School, 

Norwell (Mass.) High School, 

Oakland High School, 

Oldtown High School, 

Orono High School, 

Orange (Mass.) High School, 

Palmer (Mass.) High School, 

Parsonsfield Seminary and Piper High School, 

Elden D. Pratt, M. A. 
Patten Academy, H. N. Gardner, B. A.- 



Albert M. Rollins, B. A. 

A. G. Catheron, B. A. 

F. L. Tapley. 

Harry T. Watkins, B. A.. 

Harry S. Rowe, B. A. 

Charles L. Simmons. 

Alfred C. Thompson, B. A. 



50 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Pennell Institute, Gray, 
Phillips High School, 



C. W. Pierce, M. A. 
Frank F. Purinton, M. A. 



Phillips Limerick Academy, Limerick, 
Portland High School, 
Plymouth (Mass.) High School, 
Presque Isle High School, 
Richmond High School, 
Ricker Classical Institute, Houlton, 
Rockland High School, 
Rumford Falls High School, 
Skowhegan High School and Bloomfield Academy, Skowhegan, 

William L. Bonney, M. A. 



William riarthorne. 

Albro E. Chase, B. A. 

Agnes W. Lindsay. 

J. E. Roberts, B. A. 

E. C. Megguire, M. A. 

Arthur M. Thomas, M. A. 

L. E. Moulton, B. A. 

Charles W. Cary. 



South Paris High School, 
South Portland High School, 
Thomaston High School, 
Thornton Academy, Saco, 
Topsham High School, 
Warren High School, 
Washington Academy, E. Machias, 
Waterville High School, 
Westbrook High School, 
Westbrook Seminary, Deering, 
Whitefield (N. H.) High School, 
Wilton Academy, 
Yarmouth High School, 



Hal. R. Eaton, B. A. 

Ralph A. Parker, B. A. 

Albert S. Cole, B. A. 

Edwin P. Sampson, M. A. 

John A. Cone, B. A. 

Parker T. Pearson, B. A. 

. Sherman Harriman, B. A. 

John E. Nelson, B. A. 

Fred W. Freeman, M. A. 

O. H. Perry, B. A. 

William B. Noyes, B. A. 

Drew T. Harthorn, M. A. 

Herbert M. Moore, B. A. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 51 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



ENGLISH 



Professor Estabrooke; Mr. Upton. 
Eh i. Declamations. — In the freshman year six declama- 
tions are required — three in the fall, and three in the spring. In 
the sophomore and junior years, five are required each year — 
three in the fall, and two in the spring. Professor Estabrooke ; 
Mr. Upton. 

Eh 2. Themes. — In the sophomore year five themes, historical 
in subject, and each containing from 1,000 to 1,200 words, are 
required. In the junior year five themes are required, and in the 
senior year, two themes 01 debates. Professor Estabrooke; 
Mr. Upton. 

Eh 3. Rhetoric.-— The classification of sentences; analysis 
of the sentence with reference to punctuation, clearness, strength, 
and unity ; exercises in punctuation ; diction, with special refer- 
ence to purity, propriety, and precision of language ; the para- 
graph; themes, including the narrowing of the subject, construc- 
tion of outline, etc. ; frequent exercises in extemporaneous 
writing; formal c<says. 

The text-book is Genung's Outlines of Rhetoric. Five hours 
•a fortnight. Fall term. Professor Estabrooke ; Mr. Upton. 

Eh 4. Rhetoric- -Extended study of narration and descrip- 
tion, argumentative composition, and persuasion; construction 
of analytical outlines of selections from Burke, Webster, Macau- 
lay, and others ; practice in different kinds of composition ; exer- 
cises in extemporaneous writing. 

The text-book is A. S. Hill's Principles of Rhetoric. Five 
hours a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Estabrooke; Mr. 
Upton. 



52 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Eh 5. Anglo-Saxon. — Elements of Anglo-Saxon grammar; 
reading of easy prose and poetry. Constant reference is made 
to the relation of Anglo-Saxon to modern English. 

The text-book is Smith'?. Old English Grammar. Five hours 
a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Estabrooke. 

Eh 8. English Literature. — The text-book, Pancoast's Intro- 
duction to English Literature, is supplemented by frequent lec- 
tures, and by study in the library. A few masterpieces are 
studied in detail. Attention is given to historical and social 
conditions, and the students are required to prepare essays upon 
the characters and times studied. Five hours a fortnight. Fall 
term. Professor Estabrooke. 

Eh 9. English Literature. — A continuation of course 8. 
Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Estabrooke. 

Eh 10. English Literature. — In this course particular 
attention is pa;d to the development of the English novel and 
to the Lake poets. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Pro- 
fessor Estabrooke. 

Eh 11. English Literature. — A continuation of course 10, 
including a study of the most important American authors of 
the present century. Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. 
Professor Estabrooke. 

Eh 12. English Literature. — Readings from English fiction. 
In this course selections from English novelists (chiefly later 
ones) are read critically, in order to determine the character- 
istic qualities of each. At least one entire work of a selected 
author is carefully studied. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. 
Professor Estabrooke. 

Eh 13. English Literature. — A continuation of course 12. 
Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Estabrooke. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Assistant Professor Lewis; Mr. Goodell; Mr. Upton. 
Ml 19. French. — An elementary course covering the essen- 
tials of the grammar, and offering easy prose reading. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 53 

The text-books are: Grandgent, Short French Grammar; 
Super, French Reader; Goodell, L'Enfant Espion and Other 
Stories. Tivo hours a week. Fall term. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 20. French. — A continuation of course 19. Two hours a 
week. Spring term. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 1. French. — Elementary course. The text-books are: 
Grandgent, Short French Grammar; Super, French Reader; 
Goodell, L 'Enfant Espion and Other Stories ; Merimee, Colomba ; 
outside reading Four hours a iveeli. Fall term. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 2. French. — A continuation of course 1. Four hours a 
week. Spring term. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 21. French. — For students who offer French at entrance. 
The text-books are: Daudet, Contes (Cameron); Augier, Le 
Gendre de Monsieur Poirier ; Coppee, Contes ; Rostand, Cyrano 
de Bergerac ; Beranger, Chansons Franchises ; Composition ; out- 
side reading. Two hours a week. Fall term. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 22. French. — A continuation of course 21. Two hours a 
week. Spring term. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 3. French. — For those who have taken one year of college 
French. Authors of the nineteenth century. The text-books 
are : Crane, Le Romantisme Frangais ; Hugo, Hernani ; Kuhns, 
Alfred de Musset; Gautier, Jettatura; Dumas fils, La Question 
d'Argent; Fasnacht, French Composition; dictation; outside 
reading. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 4. French.— A continuation of course 3. Five hours a 
fortnight. Spring term. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 15. French Literature. — Authors of the sixteenth and 
seventeenth centuries, especially Corneille, Racine and Moliere. 
Lectures, outside reading and dictation. Elective for those who 
have completed course 4. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the 
fall term of even years. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 16. French Literature. — A continuation of course 15. 
Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of odd years. 
Mr. Goodell. 



54 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Ml 17. French Literature. — Authors of the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries. Lectures, outside reading, and dictation. 
Elective for those who have completed course 4. Five hours a 
fortnight. Given in the fall term of odd years. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 18. French Literature. — A continuation of course 17. 
Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of even years. 
Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 9. Spanish. — An elementary course, elective for those wha 
have completed course 2. 

The text-books are: Edgren, Spanish Grammar; Matzke, 
Spanish Reader ; Alarcon, El Capitan Veneno. Five hours a 
fortnight. Given in the fall term of even years. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 10. Spanish.- -A continuation of course 9. Five hours a 
fortnight. Given in spring term of odd years. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 11. Italian. — An elementary course, elective for those 
who have completed course 2. Modern prose writers : Gram- 
mar, composition. Five hours a fortnight. Given in fall term 
of odd years. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 12. Italian. — A continuation of course II. Five hours a 
fortnight. Given in spring term of even years. Mr. Goodell. 

Ml 5. German. — An introductory course, covering the essen- 
tials of the grammar, and presenting moderately easy prose 
reading. 

The text-books are: Joynes-Meissner German Grammar; 
Lewis, Alternative Exercises; Huss, German Reader; Storm, 
Immensee; Heyse, L'Arrabbiata; Hillern, Hoher als die Kirche,. 
Riehl, Burg Neideck. Four hours a week. Fall term. Profes- 
sor Lewis ; Mr. Upton. 

Ml 6. German. — A continuation of course 5. Four hours a 
week. Spring term. Professor Lewis ; Mr. Upton. 

Ml 27. German. — An intermediate course for students who 
offer German at entrance. The text-books are : Lessing, Minna 
von Barnhelm ; Schiller, Wilhelm Tell ; Goethe, Sesenheim, Her- 
mann und Dorothea ; Stein's German Exercises. Four hours a 
week. Fall term. Professor Lewis. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 55, 

Ml 28. German. — A continuation of course 27. Four hours a 
week. Spring term. Professor Lewis. 

Ml 25. German. — An intermediate course for those who have 
taken one year of college German. 

The text-books are : Baumbach, der Schwiegersohn ; Lessing, 
Minna von Barnhelm ; Schiller, Jungfrau von Orleans ; Goethe, 
Hermann und Dorothea ; Brandt and Day's Scientific Readings. 
Two hours a week. Fall term. Professor Lewis ; Mr. Upton. 

Ml 26. German. — A continuation of course 25. Two hours ar 
week. Spring term. Professor Lewis ; Mr. Upton. 

Ml 7. German. — Schiller, Wallenstein ; Goethe, Goetz von 
Berlichingen, Dichtung und Wahrheit ; Lessing, Emilia Galotti ; 
Helmholz, Goethe's Naturwissenschaftliche Arbeiten ; Harris, 
German Composition. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. 
Professor Lewis. 

Ml 8. German. — A continuation of course 7. Five hours a 
fortnight. Spring term. Professor Lewis. 

Ml 29. German. — Lessing, Nathan der Weise; Goethe, Faust, 
Part I. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Professor Lewis. 

Ml 30. German. — Kluge, Deutsche National Litteratur, with 
lectures, recitations and collateral reading. Five hours a fort- 
night. Spring term. Professor Lewis. 



Latin- 
Professor Harrington. 

Lt 1. Livy and Cicero. — Livy, History of Rome, Books XXI 
and XXII ; Cicero, De Senectute ; Latin composition based upon 
the authors read. Four hours a zveek. Fall term. 

Lt 2. Horace. — Selections from the Satires, Epistles, Epodes 
and Odes; classical mythology. Four hours a week. Spring, 
term. 



56 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Lt 3. Plautus and Terence. — The Captivi, Trinummus, or 
Menaechmi of Plautus ; the Andria, Adelphoe, or Phormio of 
Terence ; lectures on the development of Roman comedy. Five 
■hours a fortnight. Fall term. 

Lt 4. Cicero and Tacitus. — Selected letters of Cicero ; the 
Agricola and Germania of Tacitus. Five hours a fortnight. 
Spring term. 

Lt 5. Pliny and Tacitus. — Selected letters of Pliny the 
younger; readings in the Annals of Tacitus; studies in Silver 
Latinity. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the fall term of odd 
years. 

Lt 6. Roman Lyric Poetry. — Selections from Catullus, 
Horace, and the Latin hymns of the Christian church ; original 
research. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of 
even years. 

Lt 7. The Roman Elegiac Poets. — Selections from Catullus, 
Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid ; original research. Five hours 
■a fortnight. Given in the fall term of even years. 

Lt 8. The Roman Elegiac Poets. — A continuation of course 
7. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of odd 
years. 

Lt 9. Roman Satire. — Selections from Ennius, Lucilius, 
Varro, tforace, Persius, Juvenal, Petronius ; original research. 
Five hours a fortnight. Given in the fall term of odd years. 

Lt 10. Roman Satire. — A continuation of course 9. Five 
hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of even years. 

Lt 11. Roman Philosophy. — Lucretius (selections) ; Cicero 
(selections from the Academica, De Officiis, Tusculanse Dispu- 
tationes, De Finibus, De Natura Dcorum) ; Seneca (De Pro- 
videntia, De Vita Beata) ; lectures on the history and develop- 
ment of ancient philosophy ; original research. Five hours a 
fortnight. Given in the fall term of even years. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 57 

Lt 12. Roman Philosophy. — A continuation of course II. 
Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Lt 13. Roman Literature. — General introduction to the sub- 
ject; illustrative class-room readings; a choice of one of five 
courses of collateral reading of Roman authors. Five hours a 
fortnight. Given in the fall term of even years. 

Lt. 14. Roman Literature. — A continuation of course 13. 
Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Lt 15. Roman Rhetoric and Oratory. — Quintilian (selec- 
tions from the fnstitutio Oratoria) ; Tacitus (Dialogus de 
Oratoribus) ; Cicero (selections from the Brutus, De Oratore, 
Orator) ; a study of sample orations of Cicero, and of some of 
the fragments of Roman oratory. Five hours a fortnight. 
Given in the fall term of odd years. 

Lt 16. Roman Rhetoric and Oratory. — A continuation of 
course 15. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of 
even years. 

Lt 17. Roman Topography. — Lectures on the development of 
the city of Rome and the present condition of its ancient ruins, 
preceded by a glance at the geography of the Italian peninsula. 
Illustrated by maps, photographs, and stereopticon views. One 
hour a ivcek. Given in the fall term of even years. 

Lt. 18. Roman Private Life. — Text-book work, supplemented 
by collateral reading and lectures upon some of the more im- 
portant and interesting customs and institutions of Roman 
every-day life. One hour a week. Given in the spring term of 
odd years. 

Lt 19. Latin Writing. — Exercises in the translation of 
English into Latin with special reference to style. One hour 
a week. Given in the fall term of odd years. 

Lt. 20. Roman Epigraphy. — The principles of the science, and 
the interpretation of selected inscriptions. One hour a week. 
Given in the spring term of even years. 



58 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

GREEK 

Professor Huddilston. 

Gk I. Xenophon. — Hellenica, Books I-IV. Study of syntax, 
and daily exercises in writing, based upon the text. Four hours 
a week. Fall term. 

Gk 2. Homer. — Odyssey, Books VI-X, and XII. The reading 
of the remaining books, in English translation, is required; 
assigned readings on the history of Greek poetry, ''the Homeric 
question," and Homeric antiquities. Four hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Gk 3. Attic Orators. — Some of the shorter orations of 
Demosthenes ; selections from the minor Attic orators ; parallel 
reading en the history of Greek prose literature, and the public 
economy and social life of Athens. Five hours a fortnight. 
Fall term. 

Gk 4. Greek Tragedy.— Euripides's Medea and Sophocles's 
CEdipns Rex ; required reading on the history of the Greek tragic 
drama. Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. 

Gk 5. TnucYDiDES.-Book I. Assigned reading in Herodotus, 
and a comparative study of the three great historians of Greece. 
Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Open to those who have 
taken courses 1 and 3. 

Gk 6. Aristophanes. — The Clouds and the Knights ; lectures 
and collateral reading on the development of Greek comedy. 
Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. Open to students who 
have taken courses 2 and 4. 

Gk 7. Plato. — Selected dialogues. Lectures on the history of 
Greek philosophy with special reference to Plato and Aristotle. 
Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Open to those who have 
taken courses 3 and 5. 

Gk 8. Pindar.— The Olympian and Pythian Odes; parallel 
reading on the history of Greek lyric poetry. Five hours a fort- 
night. Spring term. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 59 

Gk 9. Greek Sculpture. — Lectures, illustrated by photo- 
graphs and lantern slides. This course does not pre- 
suppose a knowledge of Greek, and is intended to serve as a 
general introduction to Greek fine arts. The interdependence of 
the arts and their relation to the life of the Greeks, as well as 
their relation to the world's subsequent art, receives consider- 
able attention. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the fall term 
of odd years. 

Gk 10. Greek Sculpture. — A continuation of course 9 with 
a more particular study of Greek architecture. Five hours a 
fortnight. Given in the spring term of even years. 

Gk. n. New Testament Greek. — This course is intended for 
those who have no acquaintance with ancient languages, and, 
with course 12, is expected to* give considerable facility in reading 
the narrative portions of the Greek Testament. It neither takes 
the place of preparatory Greek, nor counts toward a degree in 
the Classical course. It is open to all students, but to fresh- 
men only on permission by the instructor. Five hours a fortnight. 
Given in the fall term of even years. 

Gk 12. New Testament Greek. — A continuation of course 
11. Reading of the Gospels of John and Matthew; syntax. 
Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Gk 13. Greek Private Life. — Lectures, illustrated with lan- 
tern slides and photographs. Assigned reading. Five hours a 
fortnight. Given in the fall term of even years. 

Gk 14. Greek Religion. — A study of the chief divinities in 
ancient Greek religion with special reference to the various 
types as shown in sculpture and vase-paintings. Lectures and 
assigned reading. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring 
term of odd years. 

Gk 15. Greek Prose Composition. — The writing of con- 
nected exercises, and advanced study in Greek syntax. Special 
attention will be given to style, and it is recommended that this 
course be taken in connection with Gk 3 or Gk 7. One hour a 
week. Fall term. 



60 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Gk 16. Italian Art. — The history of Italian painting of the 
Renaissance with special reference to the masterpieces of the 
15th and 16th centuries. Lectures, collateral reading, and recita- 
tions. The University has a large and growing collection of 
photographs, which is used to illustrate this course. One hour a 
week. Given in the fall term of even years, 

Gk 17. Italian Art. — A continuation of course 16. One hour 
a week. Given in the spring term of odd years. 



PHILOSOPHY 
Professor Fernald. 

PI 1. Psychology. — Among the topics considered are sensa- 
tion, structure and functions of the brain, conditions of neural 
activity, consciousness, attention, conception, discrimination, 
association, memory, imagination, perception, reasoning, instinct, 
emotions and sentiments, will as volition, will as choice, and will 
in relation to character. 

The text-book is James's Psychology (Briefer Course.) Five 
hours a fortnight. Fall term. 

PI 2. Logic. — The object of this course is to give the student 
a just appreciation of the functions of language as a means of 
expressing thought, and a familiarity with the principles of 
deductive and inductive reasoning. The student is given fre- 
quent drills in the application of logical principles. 

The text-book is Ryland's Logic. Five hours a fortnight. 
Spring term. 

PI 3. History of Philosophy. — The text-book is Weber's 
History of Philosophy. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term of 
odd years. 

PI 4. Pedagogy. — The principles of psychology applied to the 
art of teaching. The order in which the several powers of the 
mind become active; their relative activity and development at 
successive school periods. The principles and methods of teach- 
ing ; oral instruction and the study of books ; the recitation, its 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 6l 

objects and methods; methods of testing, by questions, by topics; 
examinations; psychical facts applied to moral training. Five 
hours a fortnight. Fall term. 

PI 5. Comparative Psychology. The psychology of man and 
the higher animals compared. A study of other minds than 
ours with reference to sense-experience, instinct and intelli- 
gence, association of ideas, memory, perception of relations, the 
power to reason, and the emotions. Five hours a fortnight. 
Offered in the spring term of even years. Open to juniors and 
seniors. 

PI. 6. Psychology, Advanced Course. — Besides special topics 
in general psychology, this course is designed to include a dis- 
cussion of such phenomena as sleep and dreams, the hypnotic 
state, thought transference, illusions and hallucinations. Five 
hours a fortnight. Offered in the spring term of odd years. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

PI 7. The Philosophy of History. — The literature, learn- 
ing, political and economic conditions of the great historic 
nations, and the growth of their institutions. 

The text-book, Adams's European History, is supplemented 
by lectures and topical studies. Five hours a fortnight. Given 
in the fall term of even years. 



CIVICS AND HISTORY 
Professor Rogers. 

Cv 1. General History. — The text-book is Schwill's History 
of Modern Europe. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. 

Cv 2. English History. — The text-book is Green's Shorter 
History of the English People. Five hours a fortnight. Spring 
term. 

Cv 3. American History. — Lectures, supplemented by top- 
ical investigation and study. 

The text-book is Burgess's Middle Period. Two hours a 
week. Fall term. 



62 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Cv 13. Political Economy. — Instruction is given by lectures. 
Topical readings and investigations are required. Five hours a 
fortnight. Fall term. 

Cv 14. Political Economy. — A continuation of course 13. 
Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. 

Cv 15. Constitutional Law and History. — An outline of 
Anglo-Saxon institutions, the development of the English Con- 
stitution, the growth and political conditions of the American 
colonies, the Articles of Confederation, the adoption of the Con- 
stitution, and the comparative study of the Federal and the State 
Constitutions from the historical and legal standpoints. 

The text-book is Rogers's Our System of Government. Five 
hours a fortnight. Fall term. 

Cv 16. Constitutional Law and History. — A continuation 
of course 15. Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. 

Cv 11. International Law. —The text-book is Lawrence's 
International law. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the fall 
term of odd years. 

Cv 12. Library Work. — The aim of this work is to familiar- 
ize the student with the literature of history and economics and 
to teach him to make critical and independent investigation of 
questions connected with these subjects, t Five hours a fort- 
night. Spring term. 

LAW 

Lw 1. Contracts. — The text-book is Huffcut and Woodruff's 
Cases on Contract. Four hours a week. Fall term. Mr. Price. 

Lw 2. Contracts. — A continuation of course 1. 
Four hours a week. Winter term. Mr. Price. 

Lw 3. Torts. — The text-book is Ames and Smith's Cases on 
Torts. 
Four hours a week. Fall term. Professor Walz. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 63 

Lw 4. Torts. — A continuation of course 3. 

Three hours a week. Winter term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 5. Torts. — A continuation of course 4. 

Two hours a zveek. Spring term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 6. History and Elements of L\w. — Lectures. 
One hour a zveek. Fall term. Professor Rogers. 

Lw 7. Real Property. — The text-book is Tiedeman on Real 
Property. 
Four hours a week. Fall term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 8. Real Property. — A continuation of course 7. 
Three hours a zveek. Winter term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 9. Agency. — The text-book is Huffcut's Cases on Agency. 
Three hours a week. Spring term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 10. Bankruptcy. — Lectures. 

One hour a week. Winter term. Mr. Hamlin. 

Lw 11. Bankruptcy. — A continuation of course 10. 
One hour a week. Spring term. Mr. Hamlin. 

Lw 12. Criminal Law. — The text-book is Beale's Cases on 
Criminal Law. 
Four hours a week. Spring term. Mr. Price. 

Lw 13. Quasi Contracts. — The text-book not selected. 
Two hours a zveek. Spring term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 14. Common Law Pleading. — Lectures. 
Two hours a week. Winter term. Mr. Martin. 

Lw 15. Common Law Pleading. — A continuation of course 14. 
One hour a week. Spring term. Mr. Martin. 

Lw 16. Equity. — The text-books are Bispham on Equity 
Jurisprudence, and Shepard's Illustrative Cases in Equity. Four 
hours a zveek. Fall term. Professor Walz. 



64 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Lw 17. Equity Jurisprudence. — A continuation of course 15, 
Four hours a week. Winter term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 18. Evidence. — The text-book is Thayer's Cases on Evi- 
dence. 
Four Jiours a week. Fall term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 19. Evidence. — A continuation of course 18. 

Four hours a week. Winter term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 20. Private Corporations. — The text-book is Elliott on 
Private Corporations. 
Two hours a week. Fall term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 21. Private Corporations. — A continuation of course 20. 
Tzvo hours a week. Winter term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 22. Domestic Relations. — The text-book is Elwell's 
Leading Cases. 

Three hours a iveek. Fall term. Mr. Price. 

Lw 23. Wills and Administration. — The text-book is Chap- 
lin's Cases on Wills. 

Two hours a week. Spring term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 24. Equity Pleading. — Lectures. Two hours a week. 
Spring term. Mr. Clark. 

Lw 25. Sales. — The text-book is Burdick's Cases on Sales. 
Four hours a week. Fall term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 26. Bailments. — The text-book is McClain's Cases on 
Carriers. One hour a week. Fall term. Mr. Price. 

Lw 27. Bailments. — A continuation of course 26. Three 
hours a week. Winter term. Mr. Price. 

Lw 28. Damages.- The text-book is Beale's Cases on Dam- 
ages. Three hours a iveek. Winter term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 29. Commercial Paper. — The text-book is Huffcut's Cases 
on Negotiable Instruments. Tzvo hours a week. Winter term. 
Professor Gardner. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 6^ 

Lw 30. Commercial Paper. — A continuation of course 29. 
Three hours a week. Spring term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 31. Jurisdiction of Federal Courts. — Lectures. One 
hour a week. Winter term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 32. Insurance. — The text-book is Richards on Insur- 
ance. Three hours a week. Spring term. Mr. Price. 

Lw 33. Construction of Statutes. — Lectures. Two hours a 
week. Spring term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 34. Wills. — The text-book is Chaplin on Wills. Two 
hours a week. Spring term. Professor Gardner. 

Lw 35. General Review. — The text-book is Gardner's Re- 
view in Law and Equity. Tivo hours a week. Spring term. 
Professor Gardner. 

Lw 36. Roman Law. — Lectures. One hour a week. Spring 
term. Judge Emery. 

Lw 37. Evidence. — Time not fixed. Judge Wiswell. 

Lw 38. Medical Jurisprudence. Lectures. Two hours cr 
fortnight. Winter term. Mr. Southard. 



MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY. 
Professor Hart; Mr. Siff; Mr. Packard. 

Ms 2. Algebra. — Review of quadratic equations, the bi-- 
nomial theorem, ratio and proportion, and the progressions;, 
indeterminate equations ; logarithms. 

The text-book is Wells' College Algebra. Two hours a week. 
Fall term. Mr. Packard; Mr. Siff. 

Ms 4. Plane Trigonometry. — The text-book is Phillips andi 
Strong's Trigonometry. Three hours a week. Fall term.. 
Professor Hart; Mr. Packard. 



-66 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Ms I. Solid Geometry. — Solid and spherical geometry, 
including the mensuration of solids, and original demonstrations. 

The text-book is Wells' Solid Geometry. Two hours a week. 
Spring term. Mr. Siff; Mr. Packard. 

Ms 3. Algebra. — Convergence and divergence of series ; 
undetermined coefficients ; partial fractions ; exponential and 
logarithmic series ; permutations and combinations ; probability ; 
the, theory of equations. 

The text-book is Wells' College Algebra. Three hours a 
week. Spring term. Mr. Packard; Mr. Siff. 

Ms 19. Spherical Trigonometry. — A continuation of course 
4, with additional problems and applications to spherical 
astronomy. Two hours a week. Spring term. Mr. Packard. 

Ms 5. Analytical Geometry. — A brief study of the point, 
right line, and conic sections. 

The text-book is Wentworth's Analytic Geometry. Five hours 
■a fortnight. Spring term. Mr. Siff. 

Ms 6. Analytical Geometry. — A more extended course. The 
straight line and conic sections, including polar and oblique 
coordinates ; the equation of the second degree ; introduction to 
solid analytical geometry. 

The text-book is Nichols's Analytic Geometry. Five hours a 
week. Fall term. Mr. Siff. 

Ms 7. Calculus. — Differentiation; integration by funda- 
mental formulas ; definite integrals. 

The text-book is Hall's Differential and Integral Calculus. 
Five hours a week. Spring term. Professor Hart; Mr. Siff; 
Mr. Packard. 

Ms 8. Calculus. — Applications of differential calculus ; appli- 
cations of integral calculus. 

The text-book is Hall's Differential and Integral Calculus. 
Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Professor Hart. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 67 

Ms 9. Descriptive Astronomy. — The text-book is supple- 
mented by informal lectures, and illustrated by lantern slides, 
the Trouvelot drawings of celestial objects, and work in the 
observatory. 

The text-book is Young's Elements of Astronomy. Five hours 
a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Hart. 

Ms 10. Practical Astronomy. — Problems in the conversion 
•of time, the determination of terrestrial latitudes and longi- 
tudes, and the establishment of meridian lines. The instruments 
used are the sextant, artificial horizon, portable chronometer, 
theodolite, and vertical circle. Five hours a fortnight. Spring 
term. Professor Hart. 

Ms n. Advanced Algebra. — Determinants and the solution 
•of higher equations. Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. 
Mr. Siff. 

Ms 12. Advanced Integral Calculus. — A course based upon 
Byerly's Integral Calculus. Five hours a fortnight. Given in 
the fall term of odd years. Professor Hart. 

Ms 13. Advanced Integral Calculus. — A continuation of 
course 12. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of 
even years. Professor Hart. 

Ms 20. Solid Analytical Geometry. — Lectures based on C 
Smith's Solid Geometry. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the 
fall term of even years. Professor Hart. 

Ms 15. Differential Equations. — The text-book is Murray's 
Differential Equations. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the 
spring term of odd years. Professor Hart. 

Ms 16. Practical Astronomy. — The theory and use of the 
sextant, universal instrument, transit, and equatorial. Five 
hours a fortnight. Given in the fall term of odd years. 
Professor Hart. 

Ms 17. Practical Astronomy. — A continuation of course 16. 
Five hours a week. Given in the spring term of even years. 
Professor Hart. 



68 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

PHYSICS 

Professor Stevens; Mr. Beck; Mr. Caswell. 

Ps I. General Physics. — Lectures on the dynamics of sol- 
ids, liquids and gases ; sound and light ; experiments before the 
class ; problems. Five hours a zveek. Fall term. Professor 
Stevens. 

Ps 2. General Physics. — A continuation of course i ; heat 
and electricity. Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. Profes- 
sor Stevens. 

Ps 12. General Physics. — A course covering the ground of 
course i. with more attention to the experimental and historical 
aspects and less to the mathematical. 

The text-book is Gage's Principles of Physics. Five hours a 
fortnight. Fall term. Mr. Beck. 

Ps 13. General Physics. — A continuation of course 12. 
Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. Mr. Beck. 

Ps 3. Elementary Physics. — A non-mathematical course, 
covering the ground of course 1. The recitations are supple- 
mented by lectures and experimental demonstrations. 

The text-book is Dolbear's Natural Philosophy. Five hours a 
fortnight. Fall term. Mr. Beck. 

Ps 4. Elementary Physics. — A continuation of course 3. 
Two hours a week. Spring term. Mr. Beck. 

Ps 5. Laboratory Physics. — The subjects usually included 
in an under-graduate course. Special attention is given to the 
reduction of observations, and the tabulation of results. 

Nichols's Laboratory Manual is made the basis of most of the 
experiments, t Five hours a zveek. Spring term. Professor 
Stevens : Mr. Beck ; Mr. Caswell. 

Ps 6. Laboratory Physics. — A brief course for students in 
the short course in pharmacy, t Two hours a fortnight. Spring 
term. Mr. Beck. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 69 

Ps 7. Advanced Optics. — Lectures in continuation of course 
1, based chiefly upon Preston's Light. Five hours a fortnight. 
Spring term. Professor Stevens. 

Ps 8. Advanced Physics. — One course in advanced physics 
is offered each year. For this year the text-book is Davis's 
Meteorology. Five hours a fortnight. Fali term. Professor 
Stevens. 

Ps 9. Laboratory Physics. — General laboratory work in 
continuation of course 5. t Five hours a zueek. Fall term. 
Professor Stevens. 

Ps 10. Laboratory Physics. — Advanced laboratory work in 
optics, in continuation of course 9. f Five hours a week. Spring 
term. Professor Stevens. 

Ps 11. Electrical Measurement and Testing. — The meas- 
urement of resistance, potential, current and capacity; the test- 
ing of galvanometers, etc. The charge for this course is $2.50. 
t Four hours a week. Fall term. Mr. Beck; Mr. Caswell. 

Ps 14. Electrical Measurement and Testing. — Additional 
work in the subjects offered in course II, with lectures on the 
mathematical theory of electrical instruments. The charge for 
this course is $1.00. One hour a veek. Fall term. Professor 
Stevens, t Three hours a week. Fall term. Mr. Beck ; Mr. 
Caswell. 

Ps 15. Laboratory Physics. — A special course, open to 
students who have completed courses 9, 10, and 11. Some sub- 
ject is assigned for original investigation, or the work of a pub- 
lished research is repeated, t Five hours a week. Fall term. 
Professor Stevens. 

Ps 16. Laboratory Physics. — A continuation of course 15. 
t Five hours a week. Spring term. Professor Stevens. 



70 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

DRAWING 

Professor Grovek ; Mr. Weston ; Mr. Cole. 

Dr. i. Drawing. — Free-hand work in perspective and model 
drawing; lettering. 
t Five hours a week. Fall term. Mr. Cole. 

Dr 2. Mathematical Drawing. — The plotting of functions,, 
and the solution of equations by the graphic method. 

The text-book is Harris and Hart's Lessons in Mathematical 
Drawing, t Three hours a week for thirteen weeks. Fall and 
spring terms. Mr. Cole. 

Dr 3. Mechanical Drawing. — Instruction and practice in 
the care and use of drawing instruments, in the drawing of 
geometrical problems, and in the use of water colors. The text- 
book is Anthony's Mechanical Drawing. 

t Five hours a week. Spring term. Mr. Cole. 

Dr 4. Mechanical Drawing. — Problems in shades and 
shadows, and dimension drawing. 

The text-book is Faunce's Mechanical Drawing, t Five hours 
a week. Fall term. Mr. Cole. 

Dr 5. General Drawing. — Isometric and cabinet projections, 
perspective, and the preparation of working drawings. Lectures 
and exercises in the drawing room. 

t Twelve hours a week for five weeks. Spring term. Mr. 
Weston. 

Dr 6. Descriptive Geometry. — Elementary problems; tan- 
gents, intersection of planes, cylinders, cones, spheres, etc. The 
time is divided equally between the recitation room and drawing 
room. 

The text-book is Church's Descriptive Geometry. Five hours 
a fortnight. Fall term. Mr. Weston; Mr. Cole. 

Dr 7. Descriptive Geometry. — A continuation of course 6. 
Three hours a fortnight. Spring term. Mr. Weston ; Mr. 
Cole. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 71 

Dr 8. Step.eotomy. — The application of the methods of 
descriptive geometry to the preparation of drawings for arches, 
retaining walls, bridge abutments, piers, etc. 

t Twelve hours a zveek for five weeks. Spring term. Mr. 
Weston. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Aubert; Assistant Professor Ryland; Mr. Hayes; 
Mr. Mitchell. 

Ch I. General Chemistry. — Recitations and lectures on the 
general principles of chemistry, illustrated by charts, experi- 
ments, etc. 

The text-book is Remsen's Inorganic Chemistry. Five hours 
a fortnight. Fall term. Professor Ryland. 

Ch 2. General Chemistry. — A continuation of course i. 
Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Ryland. 

Ch 3. Laboratory Chemistry. — The preparation of the more 
common elements and inorganic compounds, and the study of 
their properties. 

The text-book is Hillyer's Chemical Experiments, t Two 
hours a week. Fall term. Mr. Mitchell. 

Ch 4. Laboratory Chemistry. — Elementary qualitative anal- 
ysis. 

The text-book is Rogers's Qualitative Analysis, t Two hours 
a week. Spring term. Mr. Mitchell. 

Ch 5. Inorganic Chemistry. — Lectures and recitations, illus- 
trated by specimens. 

The text-book is Joannis's Cours elementaire de chimie, Vols. 
1 and 2. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 6. Inorganic Chemistry.— A continuation of course 5. 
Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 7. Organic Chemistry. — The marsh gas series. Lectures 
and recitations, illustrated by specimens. 

The text-book is Remsen's Organic Chemistry. Five hours a 
fortnight. Fall term. Professor Aubert. 



72 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Ch 8. Organic Chemistry. — The unsaturated compounds and 
the benzene series. 

The text-book is Remsen's Organic Chemistry. Five hours a 
fortnight. Spring term. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 10. Analytic Methods. — Discussion of gravimetric and 
volumetric methods. 

The text-books are Appleton's Quantitative Analysis and 
Clowes and Coleman's Quantitative Analysis. One hour a week. 
Fall term. Professor Aubert. 

Ch ii. Laboratory Process. — Laboratory methods and 
processes used in the arts. Five hours a fortnight. Spring 
term. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 12. Organic Chemicals. — The preparation and purifica- 
tion of typical organic substances. 

The text-book is Aubert's Organic and Inorganic Preparations, 
t Five hours a week. Fall term. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 14. Qualitative Analysis. — The determination and the 
study of the reactions involved in these processes. 

The text-book is Noyes's Qualitative Analysis. The time 
varies; it is stated in the tables. Professor Ryland. 

Ch 15. Qualitativf Analysis. — The examination of mix- 
tures of salts and the determination of their components. 

The text-book is Noyes's Qualitative Analysis. The time 
varies; it is stated in the tables. Professor Ryland. 

Ch 16. Quantitative Analysis. — Gravimetric determina- 
tions. 

The text-book is Appletons Quantitative Analysis. The time 
varies; it is stated in the tables. Mr. Hayes. 

Ch 18. Quantitative Analysis. — Analysis of complex alloys, 
minerals, etc. 

The text-book is Clowes and Coleman's Quantitative Analy- 
sis. The time varies; it is stated in the tables. Fall term. 
Professor Aubert. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE • 73 

Ch 19. Volumetric Analysis and Assaying. — Acidimetry, 
alkalimetry, oxydimetry ; gold and silver assaying. 

The text-book is Clowes and Coleman's Quantitative Analysis. 
The time varies; it is stated in the tables. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 20. Agricultural Analysis. — The analysis of fodders, 
fertilizers, milk, and other agrieultural products. The methods 
are those recommended by the Association of Official Agricul- 
tural Chemists. The time varies; it is stated in the tables. 
Professor Aubert. 

Ch 21. Toxicology and Urinalysis. — The determination of 
the commoner poisons ; the analysis of urine. 

The text-book is Aubert's Urinalysis and Toxicology. The 
time varies; it is stated in the tables. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 22. Thesis "Work. — The thesis must embody the results 
of original work in analysis, or research, t Fifteen hours a 
week for eleven weeks. Spring term. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 23. Organic Chemistry. — A continuation of course 8. 
Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 24. Industrial Chemistry. — General processes of techni- 
cal chemistry, and selected subjects including the principal 
manufactured products of special interest. Lectures and recita- 
tions. The text-book is Thorp's Outlines of Industrial Chem- 
istry. Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Aubert. 

Ch 25. Technical Analysis. — The analysis of ores and 
industrial products, t Five hours a week. Fall term. Profes- 
sor Aubert. 

Ch 26. Physical Chemical Methods. — The determination 
of molecular weight by the vapor density, boiling point, and 
freezing point methods. The use of the refractometer and the 
polariscope. t Five hours a week. Spring term. Professor 
Aubert. 



74 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Ch 27. Laboratory Physiological Chemistry. — Qualitative 
tests of fats, carbohydrates, protein, blood, milk, etc. 

The text-book is Novy's Physiological Chemistry, t Ten hours 
a week for nine weeks. Fall term. Professor Jackman. 

Ch 13 Descriptive Mineralogy. — The text-book is Moses 
and Parsons's Elements of Mineralogy, t Tzvo hours a week. 
Spring term. Professor Jackman. 

Ch 28. Dyeing. — The practical application of dyes to cotton, 
wool, and silk, t Fifteen hours a week for two weeks. Spring 
term. Professor Aubert. 

BIOLOGY 
Professor Drew ; Mr. Ricker. 

Bl 1. General Biology. — Students study in the laboratory, 
and where possible in the field, plants and animals selected to 
illustrate some of the simpler principles of biology. The gen- 
eral truths learned in the laboratory are emphasized and ar- 
ranged by recitations and lectures. This course serves as a 
preparation for more advanced work in zoology, botany and 
physiology, and affords the general student an opportunity to 
gain some knowledge of the subject. It is to be taken in con- 
nection with course 2. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. 

Bl 2. Laboratory Biolocy. — To be taken in connection with 
course 1. t Five hours a week. Fall term. 

Bl 3. Cryptogamic Botany. — Type forms of flowerless plants 
are studied in the laboratory and field. Attention is given to 
their economic importance, structure and life histories. This 
course is to be taken in connection with course 4. Course 1 is 
required as a preparation. Five hours a fortnight. Given in 
the fall term of odd years. 

Bl 4. Laboratory Botany. — To be taken in connection with 
course 3. t Two hours a week. Given in the fall term of odd 
years. 

Bl 5. Zoology (Invertebrate animals). — The habits, compar- 
ative anatomy and classification of invertebrate animals are 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 75 

studied in the laboratory, class-room and field. This course is 
to be taken in connection with course 6. It is not complete in 
itself, but should be followed by course 7. Course 1 is required 
as a preparation. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. 

Bl 6. Laboratory Zoology. — To be taken in connection with 
course 5. t Five hours a z^cck. Fall term. 

Bl 7. Zoology (Vetebratc animals). — A continuation of course 
5. Types of vertebrate animals are studied and their structures 
compared. It is to be taken in connection with course 8. This 
course is not complete in itself. It should be preceded by course 
5. Course 1 is required as a preparation. Five hours a fort- 
night. Spring term. 

Bl 8. Laboratory Zoology. — To be taken in connection with 
course 7. t Five hours a zveek. Spring term. 

Bl 9. Physiology. — A study of the physiological activities of 
the animal body, with a laboratory basis of dissections, micro- 
scopic anatomy, and simple experiments. This course is to be 
taken in connection with course 10. Course 1 is required as a 
preparation. Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. 

Bl 10. Laboratory Physiology.— To be taken in connection 
with course 9. T Five hours a week. Spring term. 

Bl 11. Entomology. — The classification and structure of in- 
sects are studied in the laboratory, and observations on life- 
histories and economic importance are made in the field. 

There are lectures and recitations at intervals during the term. 
This course is to be taken in connection with course 12. Course 
1 is required as a preparation. Five hours a fortnight. Given 
in the fall term of even years. 

Bl 12. Laboratory Entomology. — To be taken in connec- 
tion with course 11. t Tzvo hours a zveek. Given in the fall 
term of even years. 

Bl 13. Geology. — A study of the structure and history of the 
earth, and the processes by means of which geological changes are 
brought about. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. 



?6 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Bl 14. Advanced Zoology or Botany. — Students who desire 
to continue the study of zoology or botany are supplied with 
modern apparatus, and instructed in modern methods of research. 
In general each student electing this work is given a problem 
and encouraged to devise means for its solution. The time 
varies and may continue for one or more terms. 

AGRICULTURE 

Professor Woods ; Professor Gowell ; Professor Merrill ; 
Professor Russell. 

Ag 1. Biological Chemistry. — Lectures and recitations on 
the chemical changes in nature important to agriculture; the 
composition of air, soils, natural waters, and plants ; the sources 
and assimilation of plant food, and the chemical processes and 
methods of investigation by which these subjects are studied. 

The text-book is Johnson's How Crops Grow. Five hours a 
fortnight. Fall term. Professor Merrill. 

Ag 2i Biological Chemistry. — A continuation of course 1. 
Lectures and recitations in physiological chemistry, including 
the composition of the animal body, and of food materials ; the 
chemical changes involved in the digestion and assimilation of 
food ; the chemistry of milk and dairy products, and the chemical 
processes and methods of investigation by which these subjects 
are studied. 

The text-book is Arthus's Chimie Physiologique. ' Five hours 
a ivcek. Spring term. Professor Merrill. 

Ag 3. Agricultural Chemistry. — Lectures on the origin, 
composition, preparation and use of commercial fertilizers ; the 
supply, composition, care and use of farm manures, and the gen- 
eral considerations which pertain to the maintenance of soil fer- 
tility. Five hours a fortnight for nine zveeks. Given in the 
spring term of even years. Professor Woods. 

Ag 4. Agricultural Physics. — Lectures on the relation of 
soils to heat and moisture : the mechanical condition of soils 
best suited to plant growth, and the objects to be gained by cul- 
tivation. Five hours a fortnight for nine weeks. Given in the 
spring term of odd years. Professor Woods. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 77 

Ag 5. Agricultural Engineering. — Lectures on farm drain- 
age, irrigation, water supply for stock and household, farm 
implements and machinery, handling crops, construction of 
farm buildings, sites, etc. Five hours a fortnight for nine zveeks. 
Given in the spring term of even years. Professor Gowell. 

Ag 6. Stock Feeding — Lectures upon the production of cattle 
foods and their composition; formulating rations for milk and 
meat production ; the. application of the lectures to the animals 
in the herd. 

The text-book is Jordan's Feeding of Animals. Five nours a 
■week for seven weeks. Given in the spring term of odd years. 
Professor Gowell. 

Ag 7. Dairying. — Lectures upon the formation and composi- 
tion of milk ; sources of infection ; bacteria and their relation to 
dairying; ferments and their effects. 

The text-books are Grotenfelt and Woll's Principles of Modern 
Dairy Practice, and Wing's Milk and its Products. Five hours 
a fortnight for nine weeks. Given in the spring term of even 
years. Professor Gowell. 

Ag 8. Stock Breeding. — Lectures on animal reproduction, 
the principles of breeding, and the means of improvement and 
development. Practice is given in judging animals by a scale of 
points. 

The text-books are Miles's Cattle Breeding, and Saunder's 
Horse Breeding. Five hours a week for seven weeks. Given 
in the spring term of odd years. Professor Gowell. 

Ag 9. Poultry Industry. — Lectures, with practice in hand- 
ling poultry; judging by a scale of points; breeding; hatching by 
natural and artificial processes; the use of machinery; caponiz- 
ing; the construction and arrangement of buildings. Five 
hours a week for four weeks. Given in the spring term of odd 
years. Professor Gowell. 

Ag 10. Dairy Practice. — The treatment and handling of 
milk and cream ; milk testing for fat and other solids ; aeration, 
pasteurization and sterilization ; the application of acid tests and 
ferments to butter and cheese making ; operating and caring for 



7» l NIVEKSITY OF MAINE 

dairy machinery; making, curing and judging butter and 
cheese: the business management of factories and creameries. 
Each student is required to provide two suits of clothes made 
oi white drilling. fSeven hours a week for twelve weeks. 
Given in the spring term of even years. Professor Gowell. 

Ag ii. Veterinary Science. — Lecture?, demonstrations and 
clinics, illustrated by models, natural preparations, and living 
animals. Five hours a fortnight. Given in the spring term of 
odd year-. Professor Russell. 

Ag 12. Dissecting. — A brief course intended to make the 
student familiar with the location and appearance of the more 
important organs of the animal body. fSeven hours a week for 
six weeks. Spring term. Professor Russell. 

Ag 13. Bacteriology. — An elementary laboratory course, 
including the preparation of culture media and a critical study 
of the morphological and biological characteristics of a few 
typical bacteria, t Ten hours a week for four and a half zceeks. 
Spring term. Professor Russell. 

Ag 14. Animal Histology. — Dissecting and the preparation 
of the most important tissues and organs. t7Vn hours a zveek 
for nine weeks. Spring term. Professor Russell. 

Ag 15. Laboratory Bacteriology. — An advanced course. 
ITen J: ours a week for nine weeks. Spring term. Professor 
Russell. 



HORTICULTURE 
Professor Munson : Mr. Ricker. 

Ht 1. General Botany. — The structure and functions of the 
organs of plants : the development and relationship of the lead- 
ing groups. Lectures, supplemented by work in the laboratory, 
greenhouses, and field. 

Gray's School and Field Book of Botany is used for reference. 
t Five hours a week. Spring term. Professor Munson : Mr. 
Ricker. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 79 

Ht 2. POMOLOGY.— The economic importance, method of pro- 
pagation and culture, and the marketing of fruits; the principles 
and practice oi spraying plants. Lectures. Five hours a fort- 
night for nine weeks. Given in the fall term of even years. 
Professor Munson. 

Ht 3. Vegetable Gardening. — The history and uses of lead- 
ing garden vegetables, with directions for their culture in the 
field and under glass. Lectures. Five hours a fortnight for 
nine weeks. Given in the fall term of even years. Professor 
Munson. 

Ht 4. Plant Variation. — A discussion of the underlying 
principles of horticulture. The origin and distribution of culti- 
vated plants: their variation as affected by soil, climate, and cul- 
tivation; the methods and effects of crossing; the principles of 
selection, and the influence of heredity. Students in this course 
must have taken course 1. Five hours a fortnight for nine 
weeks. Given in the fall term of odd years. Professor 
Munson. 

Ht 5. Landscape Gardening. — The principles of landscape 
art and their application. Five hours a fortnight for nine weeks. 
Given in the fall term of odd years. Professor Munson. 

Ht 6. Laboratory Horticulture. — Practical work in orchard, 
garden, and greenhouse, supplementing courses 2 and 3. ^Five 
hours week. Given in the fall term of even years. Professor 
Munson. 

Ht 7. Laboratory Horticulture. — Practical work in the 
laboratory, the nursery, and on the campus, supplementing 
courses 4 and 5. *Two hours a week. Given in the fall term of 
odd years Professor Munson. 

Ht 8. Histology of Plants. — A description and comparison 
of tissues, with investigation of the minute anatomy of vegetable 
organs, and studies in the phenomena of cell development and 
fertilization. 

Goodale's Physiological Botany is used for reference. tFive 
hours a week for nine weeks. Spring term. Professor Munson. 



80 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Ht 9. Plant Breeding. — A systematic study of the ameliora- 
tion of plants by cultivation. Lectures and investigations con- 
cerning: the fact and philosophy of variation, the causes of 
individual differences, the choice and fixation of varieties; the 
philosophy of the crossing of plants, the limits of crossing, the 
function of a cross ; how domestic varieties originate, the influ- 
ence of heredity, the principles of selection. 

Bailey's Plant Breeding, Darwin's Animals and Plants under 
Domestication, and Darwin's Cross and Self Fertilization in the 
Vegetable Kingdom, are used for reference. Five hours a fort- 
night. Given in the fall term of odd years. Professor Munson. 

Ht 10. Forestry. — Importance and scope of the subject; 
meteorologcal influences ; financial considerations ; the propaga- 
tion of trees and the planting of forests ; forest management ; 
forest products ; forest fires, their prevention and control ; ene- 
mies and disease. Lectures. Five hours a fortnight. Given 
in the fall term of even years. Professor Munson. 

Ht 11. Plant Pathology. — A systematic study of the more 
important diseases of plants. Students in this course must have 
taken course 8. Lectures and investigations, f Two hours a 
zvcek. Given in the fall term of odd years. Professor Munson. 

PHARMACY 

Professor Jackman. 

Pm 1. Physical and Official Pharmacy. — The history of 
pharmacopoeias, dispensatories, etc. ; weights and measures, 
specific gravity, the pharmaceutical uses of heat, distillation, 
solution, filtration, etc. ; official preparations ; pharmaceutical 
problems, involving percentage solutions, parts by weight and 
measure, chemical principles and equations, actual pharmacy 
operations. 

The text-book is Caspari's Pharmacy. Five hours a week. 
Fall term. 

Pm 2. Inorganic, Organic and Extemporaneous Phar- 
macy. — The elements, official salts, and inorganic acids, their 
preparation and classification ; organic compounds, their classi- 
fication, official preparations; official drugs of the materia medica, 



UNIVERSITV or maim: Ol 

•classified according to their proximate principles, the prepara- 
tion of these drugs, and animal preparations; extemporaneous 
pharmacy, the principles of dispensing, store management, etc. 

The text-book is Caspan's Pharmacy. Five hours a iveek. 
Fall term. 

Pm 3. Laboratory Pharmacy. — Official preparations and 
tests. The operations of manufacturing pharmacy, including the 
preparation of granular and scale salts, infusions, syrups, tinc- 
tures, and other galenicals ; official tests of chemicals, drugs, and 
preparations, for identity, strength and adulteration ; drug assay- 
ing. 

The text-books are Caspari's Pharmacy and the U. S. Pharma- 
copoeia. ^Twelve hours a week. Fall term. 

Pm 4. Pharmacopoeia. — A complete review of the pharma- 
copoeia, with special reference to the chemical and pharmaceutical 
principles involved in tests and preparations. 

The text-books are Caspari's Pharmacy and the U. S. Pharma- 
copoeia. Five hours a week. Spring term. 

Pm 5. Inorcanic Pharmacognosy. — Official and common 
names ; practical exercises in the identification of specimens. 

The text-book is the U. S. Pharmacopoeia. Five hours a fort- 
night. Fall term. 

Pm 6. Organic Pharmacognosy. — Official and common 
names, practical exercises. 

The text-book is the U. S. Pharmacopoeia. Four hours a 
week. Spring term. 

Pm 7. Materia Medica. — Chemicals and drugs, their nature, 
uses, classification, therapeutic action, and doses; poisons, and 
antidotes. 

The text-book is Potter's Materia Medica. Five hours a 
fortnight. Fall term. 

Pm 8. Thesis Work. — The thesis must embody the results 
of original work in analysis, or research, t Twelve hours a 
week for nine weeks. Spring term. 



82 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Pm g. Pharmacy Readings. — Current pharmacy literature; 
research and reference readings ; abstracting ; reports, t Five 
hours a week. Spring term. 

Pm io. Laboratory Pharmacy. — A continuation of Pm 3. 
t Five hours a week. Spring term. 

Pm 11. Prescriptions. — Critical examination of prescriptions 
from actual files, with reference to inelegance, physiological, 
pharmaceutical, and chemical incompatibility; doses; methods 
and order of compounding, etc. 

The text-bcok is Ruddiman's Incompatibilities in Prescrip- 
tions. Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 
Professor Grover ; Mr. Weston ; Mr. Lombard ; Mr. Goodwin. 

Ce 1. Plane Surveying. — Recitations on the general prin- 
ciples of land surveying, the laying cut of land, the dividing of 
land, surveying of public lands, direct leveling, and the variation 
of the magnetic needle. 

The text-book is Raymond's Surveying. Five hours a fort- 
night. Spring term. Mr. Weston. 

Ce 2. Field Work in Surveying. — The use of the chain, 
compass, transit, and level. Instruments are adjusted, original 
surveys made, and old lines retraced. Plats are prepared of 
the surveys made in the field. \Four hours a week. Spring 
term. Mr. Weston ; Mr. Goodwin. 

Ce 3. Railroad Engineering. — Lectures and recitations on 
the theory of railroad curves, switches, turnouts and slope 
stakes : the calculation of earthworks, and the resistance to trains 
offered by grades and curves ; the theory of economic location. 

The text-book is Allen's Railroad Curves and Earthwork. 
Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Mr. Weston. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 83 

Ce 4. Railroad Work. — The location and detailed survey of 
a railroad several miles long. The curves are laid out, levels 
taken, and all the necessary measurements made to enable the 
student to compute the excavations and embankments and esti- 
mate the cost of construction. tFive hours a week. Fall term. 
Mr. Weston ; Mr. Goodwin. 

Ce 5. Highway Engineering. — The location, construction, 
and improvement of country roads under different conditions of 
soil, climate, and traffic. One hour a week. Fall term. Pro- 
fessor Grover. 

Ce 6. Mechanics. — The principles 01 statics ; the algebraic 
and graphic solution of statical problems, including simple 
trusses ; exercises in finding the moment of inertia, center of 
gravity : the principles of dynamics, shearing force and bending 
moment. Five hours a week. Fall term. Mr. Weston. 

Ce 7. Mechanics. — A continuation of course 6. Five hours 
a week. Spring term. Mr. Weston. 

Ce 8. Sanitary Engineering. — Drainage of land ; plumbing 
of houses ; drainage and sewerage of towns ; sewage disposal ; 
water supply and purification ; ventilation of houses. 

The text-book is Merriman's Sanitary Engineering. Five 
hours a fortnight. Fall term. Professor Grover. 

Ce 9. Higher Surveying. — The plane table, stadia measure- 
ments, topographical surveying, the elements of geodesy, the 
measurement of base lines, calculation of a system of triangu- 
lation. t Twelve hours a week for eight zueeks. Spring term. 
Mr. Weston ; Mr. Goodwin. 

Ce 10. Hydraulics. — The weight, pressure and motion of 
water : the flow of water through orifices and pipes ; weir gaug- 
ing; the flow of water in open channels, mains, and distribution 
pipes ; distribution systems, the construction of water works for 
towns and cities. 

The text-book is Merriman's Hydraulics. Five hours a fort- 
night. Fall term. Professor Grover. 



84 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Ce ii. Hydraulics Field Work. — The measurement of the 
flow of rivers is illustrated by the application of the current 
meter and the various forms of floats co the Penobscot river or 
some of its large branches. \Seven hours a week for six zveeks. 
Fall term. Professor Grover; Mr. Lombard. 

Ce 12. Structures.— A detailed study of the properties of 
material used in engineering structures; their resistance to 
bending, breaking, extension and compression, under the various 
conditions of practice ; the theory of stresses in framed struc- 
tures ; the usual system of loading; the principles of designing. 
Five hours a week. Fall term. Professor Grover. 

Ce 13. Structures. — A continuation of course 12; including 
the study of problems in connection with masonry structures; 
natural and artificial foundations; the stability of dams and 
retaining walls : the designing of bridge piers and abutments ; 
the theory of the masonry arch. Five hours a zveek. Spring 
term. Professor Grover. 

Ce 14. Designing. — Designs for several of the common types 
of wooden and steel structures, and preparation of drawings for 
the shop, f Seven hours a zveek for twelve weeks. Fall term. 
Professor Grover; Mr. Lombard. 

Ce 15. Designing and Thesis Work. — A continuation of 
•course 14 and the preparation of a thesis. tTwelve hours a zveek. 
Spring term. Professor Grover ; Mr. Lombard. 

Ce 16. Hydraulic Engineering. — Rainfall, evaporation, and 
stream-flow; the collection, purification, and distribution of 
water for city supplies ; water meters, water wheels and motors ; 
the development and utilization of water power. Five hours a 
fortnight. Fall term. Professor Grover. 

Ce 17. Hydraulic Engineering. — A continuation of course 
16. Five hours a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Grover. 

Ce 18. Sanitary Science. — Lectures on the causes and pre- 
vention of disease, sanitation and the public health, and the rela- 
tions of the engineer to this work. One hour a week. Fall 
term. Professor Grover. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 85 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Professor Flint; Mr. Vose ; Mr. Steward. 

Me 1. Carpentry. — The care and sharpening of tools, the 
squaring of stock, and taking work out of wind ; practice in mak- 
ing different joints in soft and hard wood; wood turning. The 
charge for material is $4.00 a term, t Seven hours a week for 
twelve weeks. Fall term. Mr. Vose. 

Me 19. Machine Drawing. — Practice in tracing completed 
drawings, and in making drawings of standard bolts, threads, 
and simple machine parts, from actual dimensions. Special 
attention is given to the care and handling of instruments, letter- 
ing, and methods of projection. 

t Seven hours a week for six weeks. Fall term. Mr. Vose. 

Me 2. Forge Work. — Drawing and upsetting; welding; mak- 
ing rings, chain links, eye bolts, bolt heads, etc. ; the making of 
a steel punch, cold chisels, and a set of lathe tools, for use in 
the machine shop ; foundry work. The student must furnish a 
forging hammer, calipers, and scale, at a cost of $2.50. The 
charge for materials is $5.00 a term, t Five hours a week. 
Spring term. Mr. Steward. 

Me 3. Kinematics. — Methods of transmitting and transform- 
ing motion, illustrated by the solution of practical problems ; 
study of forms of gearing, cone pulleys, etc. ; construction of 
cams, lobed wheels, and gear teeth. 

The text-book is Jones's Kinematics, t Five hours a week.. 
Spring term. Mr. Vose. 

Me 4. Machine Work. — Exercises in filing and chipping; 
lathe work, drilling, boring and threading in the lathe ; making 
cut gears, machinist taps, and finished bolts ; exercises on the 
planer and shaper. Each student provides himself with center 
gauge, steel scale, and files, at a cost of $2.50. The charge for 
materials is $5.00 a term. Students will be given credit for work 
in commercial shops on presentation of satisfactory proof. The 
time devoted to machine zvork varies. Mr. Steward. 



S6 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Me 8. Structures. — A continuation of course 7, with appli- 
cations to framed structures ; graphic methods of analyzing 
roof and bridge trusses, and the stability of walls. Merriman's 
Mechanics of Materials, and Merriman's Roofs and Bridges are 
used for reference. Five hours a fortnight. Fall term. Mr. 

VOSE. 

Me 9. Machine Design. — The principles of machine con- 
struction, treated by means of text-book, lectures, and a study of 
methods in modern practice ; the preparation of working draw- 
ings, and the sketching of original designs of simple machine 
parts. 

The text-book is Jones's Machine Design, Part II. t Seven 
hours a fortnight. Spring term. Mr. Vose. 

Me 10. Hydro-Mechanics. — The behavior of liquids in 
motion and under pressure, flowing through pipes and in open 
channels, with problems. 

The text-book is Bowser's Hydro-Mechanics. Five hours a 
fortnight. Fall term. Professor Flint. 

Me 11. Heat and Steam. — The characteristics of steam and 
its behavior in pipes, boilers, and particularly in the cylinders 
of engines ; problems involving the properties of saturated 
steam ; the calculation of steam pipes and safety valves ; the 
design of a boiler suited to run an engine under given conditions, 
and the detail drawings. 

The text-book is Benjamin's Heat and Steam. Five hours a 
fortnight. Fall term. Professor Flint. 

Me 12. Steam Boiler Design. — Drawings of the more im- 
portant parts of the design worked out in course II, t Twelve 
hours a 7veek. Fall term. Professor Flint. 

Me 13. Testing. — Tests of steam gauges, boilers, etc. ; tests 
of different metals under tension and compression. Five hours 
a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Flint. 

Me 14. Steam Engine. — The steam engine as a source of 
power ; the design, proportions and working of engine cylinders, 
steam pipes, and ports: engine valves, eccentrics, adjustable 



I'NIVERSITN OF MAINE 



87 



eccentrics; the locomotive link motion with its connections; 
problems on the slide valve and link motion; the calculation of 
details of an engine. 

The text-book is Auchincloss's Link and Valve Motion. Seven 
hours a fortnight. Spring term. Professor Flint. 

Me 15. Steam Engine Design.— Drawings of the parts 
worked out in course 14: the setting of valves by means of the 
indicator , the calculation of horse power ; the consumption of 
water and coal, etc. t Fifteen hours a week for nine weeks. 
Spring term. Professor Flint. 

Me 16. Thesis Work. — The design of a piece of machinery, 
or of some piece of scientific apparatus, or, an original investiga- 
tion of some engineering problem to be fully written up and pre- 
sented to the department, t Fifteen hours a zveek for nine 
weeks. Spring term. Professor Flint. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Professor Webb ; Mr. Owen. 

Ee 1. Electricity and Magnetism. — This course continues 
the subject of electricity and magnetism begun in physics. The 
work is taken up by text-book, lectures and problems. 

The text-book is Silvanus Thompson's Electricity and Mag- 
netism. Two hours a zveek. Fall term. Required of juniors 
in Electrical Engineering. Mr. Owen. 

Ee 2. Electricity and Magnetism and Dynamo Design. — A 
continuation of course 1, with the application of principles to the 
problems of dynamo design. The work is taken up by text- 
book, lectures and problems. 

The text-book is Hawkins and Wallis's The Dynamo. Three 
hours a week. Spring term. Required of juniors in Electrical 
Engineering. Mr. Owen. 

Ee 3. Electrical Machinery. — A course on the design and 
construction of direct current generators and motors. The work 
is taken by lectures and problems. Five hours a fortnight. Fall 
term. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. Profes- 
sor Webb. 



88 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Ee 4. Alternating Current Machinery. — In this course are 
considered the principles involved in the design, construction and 
operation of alternating current generators, motors, transformers 
and rotary converters. 

The text-book is Jackson's Alternating Currents and Alternating 
Current Machinery. Five hours a week for nine weeks. Spring, 
term. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. Professor 
Webb. 

Ee 5. Design of Direct Current Machines. — This course is 
taken up in the drawing room. Each student is required to 
make the calculations and drawings of a direct current dynamo. 
t Seven hours a week. Fall term. Required of seniors in Elec- 
trical Engineering. Professor Webb. 

Ee 6. Design of Alternating Current Machines. — A draw- 
ing room course similar to course 5. The calculations and 
drawings are made for an alternating current generator, t Five 
hours a week for nine weeks. First half spring term. Required 
of seniors in Electrical Engineering. Professor Webb. 

Ee 7. Laboratory Work. Direct Currents. — Tests of elec- 
trical instruments. Experimental work with generators and 
motors. Power and photometric tests of electric lamps. Care 
and management of the College lighting plant. The charge for 
this course is $5. t Five hours a week. Fall term. Required 
of seniors in Electrical Engineering. Mr. Owen. 

Ee 8. Laboratory Wort:, Alternating Currents. — A course 
similar to course 7. Tests of alternating current instruments. 
Experimental work with generators, motors, transformers and 
rotary converters, t Five hours a week for nine weeks. First 
half of spring term. The charge for this course is $2.50. 
Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. Mr. Owen. 

Ee 9. Dynamos. — The general principles and theory of 
design. Different types of machines. Practical considerations 
in the construction and operation of direct current generators and 
motors. Connecting and starting up of generators and motors. 
Illustrations by laboratory experiments. 






UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 89 

The text-book is Hawkins and Wallis's The Dynamo. Two 
hours a week. Fall term. Required of juniors in Mechanical 
Engineering. Mr. Owen. 

Ee 10. Dynamo Laboratory Work. — Practice in the connect- 
ing and running of direct current generators and motors. Tests 
for regulation, heating, efficiency and insulation, t Five hours 
a week for nine weeks. First half of spring term. Required of 
seniors in Mechanical Engineering. The charge for this course 
is $2.50. Mr. Owen. 

Ee 13. Alternating Currents. — Theory of alternating cur- 
rents. Principles of the design and construction of alternating 
current generators. Methods of testing alternating current 
machines. The text -book is Jackson's Alternating Currents and 
Alternating Current Machinery. Five hours a fortnight. Fall 
term. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. Profes- 
sor Webb. 

Ee 14. Electrical Signalling. — Theory and construction of 
telegraph and telephone instruments. Methods of operating and 
testing. The course is taken by lectures. Five hours a fortnight 
for nine weeks. Last half of spring term. Required of seniors 
in Electrical Engineering. Professor Webb. 

Ee 16. Thesis Work. — The designing of electrical apparatus, 
laboratory investigation, or commercial testing, with results pre- 
sented in proper form, t Fifteen hours a week for nine weeks. 
Last half of spring term. Required of seniors in Electrical 
Engineering. Professor Webb. 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 
Mr. . 

Each man student is required to take military drill, unless 
physically unfit, and to attend recitations in military science, dur- 
ing the first two years of his college course. In the junior and 
senior years this work is elective. The drill, course i, occupies 



90 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

the whole of the fall term and the first ten weeks of the spring 
term, one hour a day, three days in the week, counting one and 
one-half hours in reckoning the student's total time. Members 
of the sophomore class are not required to drill in the spring 
term, however, but are required to attend lectures and recitations 
in military science during the whole term, course 2, three hours 
a fortnight. 

Mt I. Military Drill. — (a.) School of the soldier, school 
of the company, school of the battalion, and extended order 
movements, (b.) Target practice at known distances up to six 
hundred yards. Marksman's buttons are awarded to cadets who 
qualify, (c.) Military signaling with flag, lantern, heliograph, 
and field telegraph, (d.) Band practice, t Three hours a 
-week for the fall term and the first ten weeks of the spring term. 

Mt 2. Elements of Military Science. — Organization, equip- 
ment and supply of armies, camp sanitation, etc., conducted by 
text-book and lectures. Three hours a fortnight. Spring term. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 91 



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The University is divided into colleges, each offering several 
courses upon related subjects. The colleges are interdependent 
and together form a unit. The organization is as follows : 

College of Arts and Sciences 

The Classical Course 

The Latin-Scientific Course 

The Scientific Course 

The Chemical Course 

The Preparatory Medical Course 

College of Agriculture 

The Agricultural Course 

The Special Courses in General Agriculture 

The Special Course in Horticulture 

The Special Course in Dairying 

The Agricultural Experiment Station 

College of Engineering 

The Civil Engineering Course 

The Mechanical Engineering Course 

The Electrical Engineering Course 

College of Pharmacy 

The Pharmacy Course 

The Short Course in Pharmacy 

School of Law 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Explanation of Tables 



The college year is divided equally into a fall term and a 
spring term. The year of the School of Law is divided into 
three terms, the fall, winter, and spring terms, of eleven, ten, 
and eleven weeks respectively. For details see the calendar. 

The quota of studies prescribed for each student is, for a 
minimum, fifteen hours, and for a maximum, twenty hours 
of class-room work each week, exclusive of declamations and 
themes. The tables are made so as to require, with the military 
work of three hours a fortnight, approximately eighteen hours' 
work each week. The numbers in the tables show the average 
number of hours a week given to each study. The number 2.5 
means three hours one week and two the next. In making up 
the quota of studies,, laboratory work and other exercises not 
requiring preparation count as half time — that is, two hours in 
the laboratory are counted as equivalent to one hour. The 
hours devoted to such studies are marked with a dagger (t) in 
the tables. 

The abbreviations and numerals preceding a study refer to the 
explanatory statements to be found on the pages given. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 93 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



The aim of this college is to furnish a liberal education and 
to afford opportunity for specialization along literary, philosophi- 
cal, and general and special scientific lines. The college com- 
prises : 

The Classical Course 

The Latin-Scientific Course 

The Scientific Course 

The Chemical Course 

The Preparatory Medical Course 



The Classical Course 

This course is planned for those who desire general culture. 
About two thirds of the work is elective. The required work 
includes Greek, Latin, mathematics, English, French, German, 
chemistry, psychology, and political economy. After the fresh- 
man year Greek and Latin are elective. The student may give 
special attention to language, mathematics, natural science, 
chemistry, or physics. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed graduate 
work in residence, or two years' in absence, including the pre- 
sentation of a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of 
Master of Arts. 



94 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



STUDIES OF THE CLASSICAL COURSE 



For Declamations and Themes see page 51; for Military Science see page 89. 
Freshman Year. 



Fall Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 

Ltl. Latin, p. 55 4.0 

Gkl, Greek p. 58 4.0 

M125, German, p. 55 or i ,. 

M121, French, p. 53 \ ,u 

Ms2, Algebra, p. 65 2.0 

Ms4, Trigonometry, p. 65 3.0 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 8 w.. . |3-0 



Spring Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 

Lt2, Latin, p. 55 4.0 

G2k, Greek, p. 58 4.0 

M126, German, p. 55 or / 

M122, French, p. 53 \ 

Ms3, Algebra, p. 66 

Msl, Solid Geometry, p. 66 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 5 w. 



2.0 

3.0 
2.0 
f3.0 



Sophomore Year. 



.... 2.5 
.... 4.0 
1... 2.5 



Required. 

Eh3, Rhetoric, p. 51 

Mil, French, p. 53 or ) 

M15, German, p. 54 i 

Chi, General Chemistry, p 

Ch3, Laboratory Chemistry, p. 71 f2.0 

Elective. 

Gk3, Greek, p. 58 2.5 

Gk9, Greek Sculpture, p. 59 2.5 

Gkll, Greek, p. 59 2.5 

Gkl3, Greek, p. 59 2.5 

Gkl5, Greek Composition, p. 59. . 1.0 

Gkl6, Italian Art, p. 60 .. 1.0 

Lt3, Latin, p. 56.. 2.5 

Psl, General Physics, p. 68 5.0 

Psl2, General Physics, p. 68 2.5 

Ms6, Analytical Geometry. P- 66. 5.0 

Ch5, Inorganic Chemistry, p. 71. 2.5 

Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p 72. t5.0 

Bll, General Biology, p, 74 2.5 

B12, Laboratory Biology, p. 74... f5.0 i 

Ltl7, Roman Topography, p. 57.. 1.0 

Cvl, General History, p. 61 2.5 

M125, German, p. 55 2.0 



Required. 

Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51 2.5 

M12, French, p. 53 or ; . n 

M16, German, p. 54 j * ,u 

Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71... 2.5 
Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry, p. 71 f2.0 

Elective. 

Gk4, Greek, p. 58 2.5 

GklO, Greek Sculpture, p. 59 2.5 

Gkl2, Greek, p. 59 2.5 

Gkl4, Greek Religion, p. 59 2.5 

Gkl7, Italian Art, p 60 1.0 

Lt4, Latin, p. 56 2.5 

Ps2, General Physics, p. 68 2.5 

Psl3, General Physics, p. 68 2.5 

Ps5, Laboratory Physics, p. 68.. f5.0 

Ms5, Analytical Geometry, p. 66. 2.5 

Dr3, Mechanical Drawing, p. 70. f5.0 

Htl, Botany, p. 78 t5.0 

Eh5, Anglo Saxon, p. 52 2.5 

Ms7, Calculus, p. 66 5.0 

Msll, Advanced Algebra, p. 67.. 2.5 

Chl5, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72 f5.0 

Ht8, Histol. of Plants, p. 79, 9w.) . , n 

Agl3, Bacteriology, p, 78, 9 w. \ ' T ° ,u 

Ltl8, Roman Private Life, p. 57.. 1.0 

M 126, German, p. 55 2.0 



Junior Year. 



Required. 
Pll, Psychology, p. 60. 



Elective. 

Gko, Greek, p. 58 

Lt5, Latin, p. 56. 

Lt7, Roman Elegiac Poets, p. 56. 
litis, Roman Literature, p. 57 — 
Ltl7, Roman Topography, n. 57.. 

Ltl9, Latin Writing, p. 57 

MIS, French, p. 53 

M17, German, p. 55 . 

Cv3, American History, p. 61 ... 

M19, Spanish, p. 54 

Mill, Italian, p. 54 

M13,Old French, p. 53 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
1.0 
1.0 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 



Required. 



P12, Logic, p. 60. 

Elective. 

Gk6, Greek, p. 58 

Lt6, Latin p. 56 

Lt8, Roman Elegiac Poets, p. 56. 
Ltl4, Roman Literature, p. 57 — 
Ltl8, Roman Private Life, p. 57.. 
Lt20, Roman Epigraphy, p. 57... 

M14, Fiencn, p. 53 

M18, German, p. 55 

Cv2, English History, p. 61 

MHO, Spanish, p. 54". , 

M112, Italian, p. 45 

M14, Old French, p. 53 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
1.0 
1.0 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.0 
2.5 
2.5 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



95 



Junior Year— Concluded. 



Elective. 

M115, French Literature, p. 53... 2.5 

MllT. French Literature, p. 65 — 2 5 

FIT. Philosophy of History, p. 61 2.6 

Cvll, International Law, p. 62... 2.5 

Ms8, Calculus, p. 66 2.5 

Msl2, Advanced Integral Calcu- 
lus, p. 67 2.5 

Ms20, Solid Analytical Geome- 
try, p. 67 2.5 

PsS, Advanced Physics, p. 69 ... 2.5 

Ps9, Laboratory Physics, p. 69. . . f5-0 
Psll, Electrical Measurements 

and Testing, p. 69 '4.0 

Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72. f5 

B15, Zoology, p. 74.. 2.5 

B16, Laboratory Zoology, p. 75.. t5.0 

Ce6, Mechanics, p. 83 5.0 

Eel, Electricity and Magnetism, 

p. 87 2.0 

Bill, Entomologv, p. 76 2.5 



Elective. 

M116, French Literature, p. 53... 2.5 
MILS, French Literature, p. 54... 2.5 
Ms9, Descrip. Astronomy, p. 67. 2.5 
MslO, Practical Astronomy, p. 67 2.5 
Msl3, Adv. lnteg. Calculus, p. 67 2.5 
Msl5, Differential Equations, 

p. 67 2.5 

Ps7, Advanced Optics, p. 69 2.5 

PslO, Laboratory Physics, p. 69. . t5.0 
Chl5, Qualitative Analy., p. 72... f5.0 
Chl6, Qualitative Analy., p. 72... f4.0 

B17, Zoology, p. 75 2.5 

B18, Laboratory Zoology, p. 75... t5.0 

Ce7, Mechanics, p. 83 5.0 

Ee2, Electricity and Magnetism, 

p. 87 3.0 



Senior Year. 



Required. 
Cvl5, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 2.5 

Elective. 

Gk7, Greek, p. 58 2.5 

Lt5, Latin, p. 56 .. 2.5 

Lt9, Roman Satire, p. 56 2.5 

Ltll, Roman Philosophy, p. 66.. 2.5 
Ltl5, Roman Rhetoric and Ora- 
tory, p. 57 2.5 

EhlO, English Literature, p. 52... 2.5 
Ehl2, English Literature, p. 52.. 2.5 
P13, Hist, of Philosophy, p. 60.... 2.5 
Msl2, Advanced Integral Calcu- 
lus, p. 67 2.5 

Ms2(),Solid Analytical Geometry, 

p.67... 2.5 

Msl6, Practical Astronomy, p. 67 2.5 

B113, Geology, p. 67 2.5 

P14, Pedagogy, p. 60 2.5 

Ht9, Plant Breeding, p. 80 2.5 

HtlO, Forestry, p. 80 2.5 

Htll, Plant Pathology, p. 80.... f2-0 

M129, German, p. 53 2.5 

B114, Advanced Zoology, p. 76. . . 2.5 



Required. 
Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 

History. P- 62 2.5 

Elective. 

Gk8, Greek, p. 58 2.5 

Lt6, Latin, p. 56 2.5 

LtlO, Roman Satire, p. 56 2.5 

Ltl2, Roman Philosophy, p. 57. . . 2.5 
Ltl6, Roman Rhetoric and Ora- 
tory, p. 57 2.5 

Ehll, English Literature, p. 52... 2.5 

Ehl3, English Literature, p. 52.. 2.5 

Cvl2, Library Work, p. 62 f5.0 

Msl3, Advanced Integral Calcu- 
lus, p. 67 2.5 

Msl5, Differential Equations, 

p.67 2.5 

Msl7, Practical Astronomy, p. 67 2.5 

B19, Physiology, p. 75 2.5 

B110, Lab. Physiology, p. 75 |5-0 

M130, German, p. 55 2.5 

B114, Advanced Zoology, p. 76... 2.5 



The Latin-Scientific Course 

This course differs from the classical course by omitting 
Greek. It requires an extensive study of modern languages, and 
permits a wide choice of elective work. 

The required studies include Latin, English, and modern 
languages; mathematical and physical science; and political 



96 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE. 



economy. Latin is not required after the freshman year, but may 
be elected in each succeeding year. By a proper selection of 
elective studies, the student may give special attention to lan- 
guage, mathematics, natural science, chemistry, or physics. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Philosophy. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed grad- 
uate work in residence, or two years' in absence, including the 
presentation of a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of 
Master of Philosophy. 



STUDIES OF THE LATIN SCIENTIFIC COURSE 
For Declamations and Themes see page 51; for Military Science see page 89. 



Freshman Year. 



Fall Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 

M15, German, p. 53 4.0 

Ltl, Latin, p. 55 4.0 

Ms2, Algebra, p. 65 2.0 

Ms4, Trigonometry, p. 65 3.0 

Chi, General Chemistry, p. 71.... 2.5 
Ch3, Laboratory Chemistry, P-71, t2.0 
Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 8 w. .. f3.0 



Spring Term— 18 weeks. 

M16, German, p. 53 

Lt2, Latin, p. 55 

Ms3, Algebra, p. 66 

Msl, Solid Geometry, p. 66 or 
Msl9, Spa. Trigonometry, p. 6i 
Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71. 
Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry.p. 
Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 5 w 



Hours. 
... 4.9 
... 4.« 
... 3.0 

si 2 '° 
... 2.5 
71 |2.0 
... 3.0 



Sophomore Year. 



Required. 

Eh3, Rhetoric, p. 51 2.5 

Mil, French, p. 53 or t 4.0 

M121, French, p. 53 \ 2 -° 

Psl, General Physics, p. 68 or | 5.0 

Psl2, General Physics, p. 68 j 2.5 

Elective. 

Lt3, Latin, p. 56 2.5 

Ms6, Analytical Geometry, p. 66. 5.0 

Chfi, Inorganic Chemistry, p. 71. 2.5 

Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72 |5-0 

Bll, General Biology, p. 74 2.5 

B12, Laboratory Biology, p. 74... f5-0 

Ltl7, Roman Topography, p. 57.. 1.0 

Gk9, Greek Sculpture, p. 59 2.5 

Gkll, Greek, p. 59 2.5 

Gkl3, Greek, p. 59 2.5 

Gkl6, Italian An, p. 60 1.0 

Cvl, General History, p. 61 2.5 

M125, German, p. 55 2.0 



Required. 

Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51 

M12, French, p. 53 or ( 

M122, French, p. 53 { 

Ps2, General Physics, p. 68 or / 
Psl3, General Physics, p. 68 \ 

Elective. 

Lt4, Latin, p. 56 

Ms5, Analytical Geometry, p. 66. 
Ps5, Laboratory Physics, p. 68... 
Dr3, Mechanical Drawing, p. 70. 

Htl , Botany, p. 78 

Eh5, Anglo-Saxon, p. 52 

Ms7, Calculus, p. 66 

Msll, Advanced Algebra, p. 67.. 
Chl5, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72. 
Ht8, Histol. of Plants, p. 79,9 w. ) 
Agl3, Bacteriology, p. 78, 9 w . . ) 
Ltl8, Roman Private Life, p. 57.. 

GklO, Greek Sculpture, p. 59 

Gkl2, Greek, p. 59 

Gkl4, Greek Religion, p. 59 

Gkl7, Italian Art, p. 60 

M126, German, p. 55 



2.5 
4.0 
2.0 

2.5 



2.5 
2.5 

|5.0 
t5.0 
f5.0 
2.5 
5.0 
2.5 
f5.0 

f5-0 

1.0 
2.5 

2.5 

2.8 
1.0 
1.9 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



97 



Required. 
Eh8, English Literature, p. 52.. 
Pll, Psychology, p. 60 



Junior Year. 

Required. 
2.5 Eh9, English Literature, p. 52 ... 2.5 
2.5 P12, Logic, p. 60 2.5 



Elective. 

M13, French, p. 58 

M17, German, p. 55 

Lto, Latin, p. 56 

Lt7, Roman Elegiac Poets, p. 56. 

Ltl3, Roman Literature, p. 57.... 

Ltl7, Roman Topography, p. 57.. 

Ltl9, Latin Writing, p. .57 

•Cv3, American History, p. 61 

M19, Spanish, p. 54 

Mill, Italian, p. 54 

M115, French Literature, p. 53 ... 

M117, French Literature, p. 5t 

P17, Philosophy of History, p. 61 

■Cvll, International Law, p. 62... 

Ms8, Calculus, p. 66 

Msl2, Advanced Integral Calcu- 
lus, p. 67 

Ms20, Solid Analytical Geome- 
try, p. 67 

Ps8, Advanced Physics, p. 66 

Ps9, Laboratory Physics, p. 69... 

Psll, Electrical Measurements 
and Testing, p. 69 

Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72 

B15, Zoology, p. 74 

B16, Laboratory Zoology, p. 75.. 

Ce6, Mechanics, p. 83 

Eel, Electricity and Magnetism, 
P. 87 

Bill, Entomology, p. 75 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
1.0 
1.0 
2.0 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 



2.5 

2.5 

2.5 

|5.0 

t4.0 
|5.0 

2.5 
f5.0 

5.0 

2.0 
2.5 



Elective. 

M14, French, p. 53 

M18, German, p. 55 

Lt6, Latin, p. 56 

Lt8, Roman Elegiac Poets, p. 56. 
Ltl4, Roman Literature, p. 57.... 
Ltl8, Roman Private Life, p. 57.. 
Lt20, Roman Epigraphy, p. 57. . . • 

Cv2, English History, p. 61 

MHO, Spanish, p. 54 

M112, Italian, p. 54 

M116, French Literature, p. 53... 
M118, French Literature, p. 54... 
Ms9, Descrip. Astronomy, p. 67.. 
MslO, Practical Astronomy, p. 67 
Msl3, Adv. lnteg. Calculus, p. 67 
Msl5, Differential Equations, 

p. 67 

Ps7, Advanced Optics, p. 69 

PslO, Laboratory Physics, p. 69.. 
Chl5, Qualitative Analy., p. 72... 
Chl6, Quantitative Analy., p. 72. 

B17, Zoology, p. 75 

B18, Laboratory Zoology, p. 75... 

Ce7, Mechanics, p. 83 

Ee2, Electricity and Magnetism, 

p. 87 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 



5 

5 





5 

S 

5 

5 

2.5 

2.5 

2.5 

2.5 



2.5 

f5.0 
t5.0 
t4.0 

2.5 
f5.0 

5.9 

3.0 



Senior Year 
Required. 
€vl3, Political Economy, p. 62.... 2.5 
Cvl5, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 2.5 



Elective. 

Lt5, Latin, p. 56 

Lt9, Roman Satire, p. 56 

Ltll, Roman Philosophy, p. 56... 

Ltl5, Roman Rhetoric and Ora- 
tory, p. 57 

EhlO, English Literature, p. 52... 

Ehl2, English Literature, p. 52... 

P13, Hist, of Philosophy, p. 60.... 

Msl2, Advanced Integral Calu- 
lus, p. 67 

Ms20, Solid Analytical Geometry 
p. 67 

Msl6, Practical Astronomy, p. 67 

B113, Geology, p. 75 

P14, Pedagogy, p. 70 

Ht9, Plant Breeding, p. 70 

HtlO, Forestry, v>. 80 ... 

Htll, Plant Pathology, p. 80 

M129, German, p. 55 

B114, Advanced Zoology, p. 76... 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 

2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
t2.0 
2.5 
2.5 



Required. 
Cvl4, Political Economy, p. 62... 2.5 
Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 2.5 



Elective. 

Lt6, Latin, p. 56 2.5 

LtlO, Roman Satire, p. 56 2.5 

Ltl2, Roman Philosophy, p. 57.. 2.5 
Ltl6, Roman Rhetoric and Ora- 
tory, p. 57 2.5 

Ehll, English Literature, p. 52... 2.5 

tihl3, English Literature, p. 52.. 2.5 

Cvl2, Library Work, p. 62 f5.0 

Msl3, Advanced Integral Calcu- 
lus, p. 67 2.5 

Mslo, Differential Equations, 

p. 67 2.5 

Msl7, Practical Astronomy, p. 75 2.5 

B19, Physiology, p. 75 2.5 

Blio, Lab. Physiology, p. 75 f5-0 

M130, German, p. 55 2.5 

B114, Advanced Zoology, p. 76... 2.5 



9 8 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



The Scientific Course 

This course is arranged for those who seek a broad general 
training, based chiefly upon the study of science, modern lan- 
guages, and history. It prepares students for executive posi- 
tions in banking, commercial, or manufacturing establishments, 
or for teaching. 

The work of the freshman year consists of English, modern 
languages, history, mathematics, drawing, chemistry, and botany. 
After the freshman year, a large part of the work — varying 
from one third at the beginning to three fourths at the end — is 
elective. The required courses include analytical geometry, 
general physics, French, German, English literature, English 
history, American history, constitutional history, psychology, 
logic, and political economy. The elective studies may be 
selected to give a comprehensive course in the mathematical or 
natural sciences, or a specialized course in modern languages, 
mathematics, physics, or natural science. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in 
residence, or two years' in absence, including the presentation of 
a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of Master of Science. 



STUDIES OF THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 
For Declamations and Themes see page 51; for Military Science see page 89. 



Freshman Year. 



Fall Term— 18 weeks. 



Eli3, 
Ms2, 
Ms4, 
M15, 
M127 
Dr2, 

Chi, 
Ch3, 



Hours. 
... 2.5 
.... 2.0 
... 3.0 



4.0 



Rhetoric, p. 51 

Algebra, p. 65 

Trigonometry, p. 65 

German, p. 54 or ) 

, German, p. 54 \ 

Mathematical Drawing, p. 

70, 8 w f3-0 

General Chemistry, p. 71 . . • 2.5 
Laboratory Chemistry, p. 71 f2.0 



Spring Term— IS weeks. 



Hours. 
.... 2.5 



Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51 

Ms3, Algebra, p. 66 3.0 

Msl, Solid Geometry, p. 96 or ) 9 n 
Msl9, Sph. Trigonom., p. 66 i 
M16, German, p. 54 or { . n 

M128, German, p. 55 j q 

Dr2, Mathematical Drawing, p. 

70, 5 w 

Htl, General Botany, p. 78 

Ch2, Genera] Chemistry, p. 71 . . . 



t3.0 
t5.0 
2.5 



Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry, p. 71 t 2 - 



Sophomore Year. 



Required. 

Mil, French, p. 53 or ) .. 4.0 

M121, French, p. 53 i 20 

Pal, General Physics, p. 68 or i 5.0 

Psl2, General Physics, p. 68 i 2.5 



Required. 

Ml 2, French, p. 53 or I 

M122, French, p. 53 \ 

Ps2, General Physics, p. 68 or 
Psl3, (ieneral Physics, p. 68 
Ps5, Laboratory Physics, p. 6! 
Ms5, Analytical Geometry, p. 



4.0 
2.0 

2.5 
t5.0 
2.5 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE. 



99 



Sophomore Year— Concluded. 



Elective. 
Ch5, Inorganic Chemistry, p. ' 
Chl4, Qualitative Analysis.p.' 
Ms6, Analytical Geometry, p. 
Bll, General Biology, p. 75 — 
B1'2, Laboratory Biology, p. 7' 
Ltl7, Roman Topography, p. I 
Gk9, Greek Sculpture, p. 59. . 

Gkll, Greek, p. 59 

GklS, Greek, p. 59 

Gkl6, Italian Art, p. 00 

Cvl, General History, p. 61 .. 
M125, German, p. 55 



2.5 
f5.0 
5.0 
2.5 

t5.e 

1.0 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
- 1.0 
2.5 
2.0 



Elective. 

Eh5, Anglo-Saxon, p. 52 2.5 

Ms7, Calculus, p. 66 5.0 

Msll, Advanced Algebra, p. 67 .. 2.5 
eh 15, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72, t5.0 
Ht8, Histol.of Plants,p.79,9w. ( .. ft 
Agl3, Bacteriologv, p.7S, 9 w. \ TJ,U 
Ltl8, Roman Private Life, p. 57.. 1.0 

GklO, Greek Sculpture, p. 59 2.5 

Gkl2, Greek, p. 59 2.5 

Gkl7, Italian Art, p. 60 1.0 

M126, German, p. 55 2.0 



Junior Year. 



Required. 
EhS, English Literature, p. 52 ... 
M13, French, p. 53 or ) 

M17, German, p. 55 1 

Pll, Psychology, p. 60 

Cv3, American* History, p. 61 .. 

Elective. 

M19, Spanish, p. 54 

Mill, Italian, p. 54 

M115, French Literature, p. 53 ... 

M117, French Literature, p. 54 ... 

P17. Philosophy of History, p. 61 

Cvll, International Law, p. 62... 

Ms8, Calculus, p. 66 

Msl2, Advanced Integral Calcu- 
lus, p. 67 

Ms20, Solid Analytical Geome- 
try, p. 67 

Ps8, Advanced Physics, p. 69 

Ps9, Laboratory Physics, p. 69. . 

Psll, Electrical Measurements 
and Testing, p. 69 

Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72, 

B15, Zoology, p. 74 

B16, Laboratory Zoology, p. 75.. 

Ce6, Mechanics, p. 83 

Eel, Electricity and Magnetism, 
P-87 

Bill, Entomology, p. 75 



2.5 



2.5 
2.5 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 

2.5 

2.5 

2.5 

f5.0 

t4.0 

[5.0 
2.5 

|5.0 
5.0 

2.0 
2.5 



Required. 

Eh9, English Literature, p. 52 ... 2.5 

M14, French, p. 53 or / „ ~ 

M18, German, p. 55... t *'° 

P12, Logic, p. 60 2.5 

Cv2, English History, p. 61 2.5 

Elective. 

MHO, Spanish, p. 54 2.5 

M112, Italian, p. 54 2.5 

M116, French Literature, p. 53 ... 2.5 
M118, French Literature, p. 54... 2.5 
Ms9, Descrip. Astronomy, p. 67.. 2.5 
MslO, Practical Astronomy, p. 67 2.5 
Msl3, Advanced Integral Calcu- 
lus, p. 67 2.5 

Msl5, Differential Equations, 

p. 67 . 2.5 

Ps7, Advanced Optics, p. 69 2.5 

PslO, Laboratory Physics, p. 69.. t5.0 

Chl5, Qualitative Analy., p. 72... fo.O 

Chl6, Quantitative Analy., p. 72.. f4.0 

B17, Zoology, p. 05 2.5 

B18, Laboratory Zoology, p. 75 .. t5-0 

Ce7, Mechanics, p. 83 5.0 

Ee2, Electricity and Magnetism, 

p. 87 3.0 



Required. 
Cvl3, Political Economy, p. 
Cvl5, Constitutional Law 
History, p. 62 



Senior Year. 

Required. 

62.. 2.5 Cvl4, Political Economy, p. 62... 2.5 
and Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 

2.5 History, p. 62.. 2.5 



Elective. 
EhlO, English Literature, p. 52 . . 2.5 
Ehl2, English Literature, p. 52 . . 2.5 
P13, Hist, of Philosophy, p. 60... . 2.5 
Msl2, Advanced Integral Calcu- 
lus, p. 67 2.5 

Ms20, Solid Analytical Geome- 
try, p. 67-..' 2.5 

Msl6, Practical Astronomy, p. 67 2.5 

B113, Geology, p. 75 2.5 



Elective. 

Ehll, English Literature, p. 52 .. 

Ehl3, English Literature, p. 52 .. 

Cvl2, Library Work, p. 62 

Msl3, Advanced Integral Calcu- 
lus, p. 67 

Msl5, Differential Equations, 
p. 67 

Msl7, Practical Astronomy, p. 67 

B19, Physiology, p. 75 



2.5 
2.5 

t5.0 

2.5 

2.5 
2.5 

2.5- 



100 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Senior Year— Concluded. 



Elective. 

P14, Pedagogy, p. 60 

Ht9, Plant Breeding, p. 80 ... 

HtlO, Forestry, p. 80 

Htll, Plant Pathology, p. 80. 

M129, German, p. 55. 

B114, Advanced Zoology, p. 7 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
f2.0 
2.5 
2.5 



Elective. 
B110, Lab. Physiology, p. 75 

M130, German, p. 55 .. 

B114, Advanced Zoology, p 



f5.0 

2.5 

76... 2.5 



The Chemical Course 

This course is designed for those who plan to become pro- 
fessional chemists and analysts, managers or chemists of indus- 
tries which require an extensive knowledge of chemistry, or 
teachers of chemistry. Attention is given to preparation for the 
work of the agricultural experiment stations. In addition to a 
theoretical knowledge of chemistry, the student acquires, in his 
biological studies, a knowledge of comparative anatomy, and of 
the lower forms of life, and, in his work in the laboratories, 
facility in the manipulation of chemical apparatus and the micro- 
scope. 

Lectures and recitations are closely associated with practical 
work in the laboratories. The student is drilled in the use of 
chemical apparatus, in accurate observation, and in careful inter- 
pretation of directions. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Upon the completion of one year's prescriped work in 
residence, or two years' in absence, including the presentation of 
a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of Master of Science. 



STUDIES OF THE CHEMICAL COURSE 



For Declamations and Themes see page 51; for Military Science see page 
Freshman Year. 



Fall Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 

Eh3, Rhetoric, p. 51 2.5 

Ms2, Algebra, p. 65 2.0 

Ms4, Trigonometry. P- 65 3.0 

M15, German, p. 54 or I . ft 

M127, German, p. 54 ) 

Drl, Drawing, p. 70 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 8 w 
Chi, General Chemistry, p. 71 
Ch3, " 



t5.0 
t3.0 
2.5 



Laboratory Chemistry, p.71, f2.0 



Spring Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 

Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51 2.5 

Ms3, Algebra, p. 66 3.0 



Msl, Solid Geometry, p. 66 or 
Msl9, Sph. Trigonometry, p. 66 
M16, German, p. 54 or ( 

M128, German, p. 55 \ 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 5 w. 

Htl, General Botany, p. 78 

Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71. 



2.0 



4.0 

f3.0 
f5.0 
2.5 



Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry,p.71, |2.0 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



IOI 



Sophomore Year. 



Mil, French, p. 53 or 

M121, French, p. 53 (2 hrs.) and 

M17, German, p. 55(2.5 hrs.) 

Psl2, General Physics, p. 68 2.5 

Cb5, Inorganic Chemistry, p- 17. 2.5 
Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72,tl0.0 

Bll, General Biology, p. 74 2.5 

B12, Lahoratory Biology, p. 74... |2.0 



4.0 



M12. French, p. 53 or ) 

M122, French, p. 53 (2 hrs.) and \ 
M18, German, p. 55 (2.5 hrs.) ) 

Psl3, General Physics, p, 68 

Ps5, Lahoratory Physics, p. 68 .. 
Ms5, Analytical Geometry, p. 66, 2.5 
Ch6, Inorganic Chemistry, p. 71. . 2.5 
Chl5, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72, |7-0 



4.0 



2.5 
f5.0 



Junior Year. 



Pll, Psychology, p. 60 2.5 

M17, German, p. 55 or ) , 

M13, French, p.53 ( J "° 

Ch7, Organic Chemistry, p. 71 • • . 2.5 
ChlO, Analytical Methods, p. 02. . 1.0 

Chl6, Quan. Analysis, p. 72 f5.0 

Chl8, Quan. Analysis, p. 72 flO-0 

Eel, Electricity and Magne-1 

tism, p. 87 (2 hrs.) or [ - 
Eh8, English Literature, p.52 or f "° 
P14, Pedagogy, p. 60 J 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 



P12, Logic, p. 60 

M18, German, p. 55 or ) 

M14, French, p. 53 \ 

Ch8, Organic Chemistry, p. 72 . . . 
Chl9, Volumetric Analysis and 

Assaying, p. 73 f!5-0 

Cv2, English History, p. 61 or 

Eh9, Eng. Literature, p. 52 or ) 2.5 

Ms9, Descrip. Astronomy, p. 67 



Senior Y 7 ear. 



Cvl3, Political Economy, p. 62. . . 2.5 
Cyl5, Constitutional Lav/ and 

History, p. 62 2.5 

Chl2, Organic Chemicals, p. 72. . . |2.5 
Ch20, Agricultural Analysis, p.73 f9.0 
Ch21, Toxicology and Urinalysis, 

p. 73 fl-0 

Ch23, Organic Chemistry, p. 73 .. 2.5 
B113, Geology, p. 75 2.5 



Cvl4, Political Economy, p. 62. . . 2.5 
Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 

History, P- 62 2.5 

Chll, Lahoratory Processes, p.72, 2.5 
Agl3, Bacteriology, p. 78, 5 w. f 10 ) 
Ch28, Dyeing, p. 74, 2 w. fl5 f fl5.0 

Ch22, Thesis Work,p.73,13 w. +15 ) 
Ch24, Industrial Chemistry, p.73, 2.5 



The Preparatory Medical Course 

This course is especially arranged to meet the needs of those 
students who are planning to become physicians ; but it also 
offers to those who are interested in the biological sciences a 
useful training for teaching or investigation. 

The technical work of the course consists mainly of two lines 
of study, chemical and biological. In both of these lines the 
work is continued through the greater part of the course, and 
students receive sufficient training to make them familiar with 
methods and apparatus. Accurate observation and the careful 
consideration of the meaning of observed facts are the important 
features of this course. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in 
residence, or two years' in absence, including the presentation of 
a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of Master of Science- 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



STUDIES OF THE PREPARATORY MEDICAL COURSE 
For Declamations and Themes see page 51 ; for Military Science see page 89. 



Freshman Year. 



Fall Term— 18 weeks. 

Hoars. 

Eh3, Rhetoric, p. 51 2.5 

Ms2, Algebra, p. 65 2.0 

Ms4, Trigonometry, p. 65 ... 3.0 

M15, German, p. 54 or I . n 

M127, German, p. 54 \ * -u 

Drl, Drawing, p. 70 |5-0 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 8 w... |3.0 
Chi, General Chemistry, p. 71 . . . 2.5 
Ch3,Lahoratory Chemistry,p.71. t2.0 



Spring Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 
... 2.5 



Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51 

M S3, Algebra, p. 66 

Msl, Solid Geometry, p. 66 or 
Msl9, Sph. Trigonometry, p.66 
M16, German, p. 54 or I 
M128, German, p. 55 ( 



3.0 

2.0 

4.0 



Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 5 w... |3.0 



Htl, General Botany, p. 78... 
Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71 



f5.0 
2.5 



Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry,p.71. |2.0 



Sophomore Year. 



Mil, French, p. 53, or 
M121, French, p. 53 (2 h.) and j 
M17, German, p. 55, (2.5 hrs.) \ 
Psl2, General Physics, p. 68.... 
Ch5, Inorganic Chemistry, p. 71 
Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p. 7 
3311, General Biology, p. 74. ... 
B12, Laboratory Biology, p. 74. 



4.0 

2.5 

2.5 
f6.0 

2.5 
f5.0 



M12, French, p. 53 or 

M122, French, p. 53 (2 h.) and ) 

M18, German, p. 55 (2.5 his.) j 

Psl3, General Physics, p. 68 

Ps5, Laboratory Physics, p. 68 
Ch6, Inorganic Chemistry, p. 7 
Chl5, Qualitative Analysis, p. ' 
Ht8, Histology of Plants, p. 79, 

9 w. 
Agl3, Bacteriology, p. 78, 9 w. 



.. f5.0 

1. 2.5 

2. 5.0 

! f5.0 



Junior Year. 



M17, German, p. 55 or i Q - 

M13, French, p. 53 \ w, ° 

Pll, Psychology, p. 60 2.5 

Ch7, Organic Chemistry, p. 71 . . • 2.5 
Chl6,Quantitative Analysis.p. 72 f6.0 

B15, Zoology, p. 74 2.5 

B16, Laboratory Zoology, p. 75 .. f5-0 
Agl, Biological Chemistry, p. 76. 2.5 



P12, Logic, p. 60 or ) 9 ,. 

Agll, Veterinary Science, p.78 \ ' 
Chl9, Volumetric Analysis, p. 73.fll.0 
Ch21, Toxicology and Urinalysis, 

p. 73 fl-0 

B17, Zoology, p. 75 2.5 

BIS, Laboratory Zoology, p. 75.. |5.0 
Ag2, Biological Chemistry, p. 76. 5.0 



Senior Y t ear. 



Cvl3, Political Economy, p. 62... 

Cvl5, Constitutional Law and 
History, p. 62 

Cvl, General History, p. 61 

B113, Geology, p. 75 

Pm3, Laboratory Pharmacy, ~| 
p. 81, 9 w. 

•Ch27, Laboratory Physiologi- 
cal Chemistry, p.74, 9w. 

Pm7, Materia Medica, p. 81... 



2.5 

2.5 
2.5 
2.5 

tlO.O 



Cvl4, Political Economy, p. 62. . . 2.5 
Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 2.5 

B19, Physiology, p. 75 2.5 

B110, Laboratory Physiology,p.75 |5 
P12, Logic, p. 60 or ( „, 

Agll, Veterinary Science, p. 58 { * *'° 
Agl4, Animal Histology, p. 78, ) 

9w. [flO.O 

A gl5, Lab. Bacteriology, p.78 9 w ) 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 103 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



The aim of the College of Agriculture is to prepare young men 
to become farmers, or teachers or investigators of agricultural 
subjects. The instruction is arranged, first, to secure for the 
student that intellectual development which is a condition funda- 
mental to the highest success in any calling, and, second, to give 
the necessary technical knowledge. The college comprises : 

The Agricultural Course 

The Special Courses in General Agriculture 

The Special Course in Horticulture 

The Special Course in Dairying 

The Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Agricultural Course 

This course is designed for those who wish to follow agricul- 
ture as a business, or intend to become teachers or investigators 
in the sciences related to agriculture. It is broadly educational, 
particularly in the natural sciences and their relations to human 
needs and activities, and gives a preliminary training for 
either business or professional life. The distinctive studies 
of this course are along technical lines, but the branches per- 
taining to general culture, to social and civil relations, occupy an 
important place. 

The theoretical instruction, especially that of the last two 
years, is associated with practical work and observation. Prac- 
tice is combined with theory whenever necessary for the demon- 
stration of a principle or when skilled labor is involved, but the 
student's time is not consumed in merely manual operations. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in 
residence, or two years' in absence, including the presentation of a 
satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of Master of Science. 



i©4 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



STUDIES OF THE AGRICULTURAL COURSE 



For Declamations and Themes see page 51; for Military Science see page 89.. 



Freshman Year. 



Faee Term— 18 weeks. 



Eh3, 
Ms2, 
Ms4, 
Ml 5, 
M127 
Drl, 
Dr2, 
Chi, 
Ch3, 



Hours. 
.. 2.5 



Rhetoric, p. 51 

Algebra, p. 65 

Trigonometry, p. 65 

German, p. 54 or ) . 

, German, p. 54 i 

Drawing, p. 70 

Math. Drawing, p. 00, 8 w . 
General Chemistry, p. 71.. 



2.(1 
3.0 



t5.0 
f3.0 
2.5 



Laboratory Chemistry, p.71, f2.0 



Spring Term— is weeks. 

Hours 

Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51 2.5 

Ms3, Algebra, p. 66 

Ms], Solid Geometry, p. 66 or 

Msl9, Sph. Trigonometry, p. 66 

M16, German, p. 54 or ) A A 

M128, German, p. 55 | 4 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 5 w 

Htl, General Botany, p. 78 

Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71 

Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry, p.71, |2-0 



3.0 

2.0 



f3.0 

|5.0 

.5 



Sophomore Year. 



Mil, French, p. 53 or 

M121, French, p. 53 (2 h.) and / ) 

M17, German, p. 55 (2.5 hrs.) 

Psl2, General Physics, p. 68 2.5 

Ch5, Inorganic Chemistry, p. 71.. 2.5 
Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72, |6.0 

Bll, General Biology, p. 74 2.5 

B12, Laboratory Biology, p. 74... f2.0 



M12, French, p. 53 or 

M122, French, p. 53 (2 h.) and I 

M18, German, p. 55, (2.5 hrs.) j 

Psl3, General Physics, p. 68 

Ps5, Laboratory Physics, p. 68 , 
Ch6, Inorganic Chemistry p. 71. 

Chl6, Quan. Analysis, p. 72 

Ht8, Hist, of Plants, p. 79, 9 w. 
Agl3, Bacteriology, p. 78, 9 w. 



4.0 

2.5 
|5.0 
2.5 

T8.0 

f5.0 



Junior Yeak. 



2.5 



M17, German, p. 55 or l 

M13, French, p. 53 \ 

Agl, Biological Chemistry, p. 
Ch7, Organic Chemistry, p. 71. 
*Ht2, Pomology, p. 79, 9 w. 
*Ht3, Vegetable Gardening, p 

79, 9w. 
*Ht6, Laboratory Horticulture, 

p. 79 |5.0 

Ch20, Agricul. Analvsis, p. 73.... |6 

*B111, Entomology, p. 75 . . 2.5 

*B112, Laboratory Entomology, 

p. 75 t2.5 



*Cv2, English History, p. 61... . 
Ag2, Biological Chemistry, p. 76, 

*Ag7, Dairying, p. 77, 9 w ) 

*Ag5, Agricultural Engineering [ 

p. 77, 9 w. " ) 

*Agl0, Dairy Practice, p.77,12 w. i 
*Agl2, Dissecting, p. 78, 6 w. \ 
*Ht4, Plant Variation, p. 79, 9 w. ) 
*Ht5, Landscape Gardening, p. / 

79, 9 w. ) 

*Ht7, Laboratory Horticulture, 

p, 79 

*Htll, Plant Pathology, p. SO .... 



2.5 
5. a 

2.5 
|7.0 
2.5 



f2.0 
t2.0 



Cvl3, Political Economy, p. 62... 
Cvl5, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 

Pll, Psychology, p. 60 

B113, Geology, p. 75 

}Ag3, Agricultural Chemistry,") 

p. 76, 9 w. I 

JAg4, Agricultural Physics, p. { 

76, 9 w. j 

JHtlO, Forestry, p. 80 

JB13, Crytogamic Botany, p. 74.. 
JB14, Laboratory Botany, p. 74.. 



Senior y^ear 
.. 2.5 



2.5 
2.5 
2.5 

2.5 

2.5 
2.5 

f2.0 



Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 2.5 



P12, Logic, p. 60. 
JAg6, Stock Feeding, p. 77, 7 w. ) 
JAgS, Stock Breeding, p. 77, 7 w. | 
JAg9, Poultry Industry, p.77, 4 w. ) 
JAgll, Veterinary Science, p. 78, 

1B19, Physiology, p. 75 

iBl 10, Laboratory Phvsiology, 
p. 75 



2.5 
5.0 



2.5 
2.5 



f5.0 



* Given to juniors and seniors in fall term of odd years and spring term 
of even years. 

t Given to juniors and seniors in fall term of even years and spring term 
of odd years. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 105 



The Special Courses in Agriculture 

For those who car: meet the expense, the investment of time 
and money necessary to complete the four years' course, is most 
wise. To others the Special Courses in Agriculture are offered. 
Students are admitted to courses of such length as their time 
will allow, and of such breadth as their previous training will 
permit. 

For admission to these courses, applicants should possess a 
good common school education. No formal entrance examina- 
tion is required for admission to courses of one term or less, 
but the professor in charge will satisfy himself of the fitness of 
candidates to pursue the course with success. The require- 
ments for admission to courses of one year or more are given on 
page 39- 

These courses are intended to give the greatest amount of 
directly useful knowledge that can be acquired in the time 
allotted. The studies pursued must usually be selected from 
those announced in the catalogue, but they will be arranged, so 
far as practicable, to meet the needs of each student. 

The annual expenses for courses of one year or more, are the 
same as those of students in the four years' courses. No charge 
is made for rooms. Students in the special courses, who are in 
attendance for one term or less, are not charged tuition. 

These courses, including the work in agriculture, horticul- 
ture, animal industry, and veterinary science, are in the gen- 
eral charge of the Professor of Agriculture, to whom inquiries 
should be addressed. 

The outline of the subjects which may be profitably pursued, 
and which a student may expect to complete within the time 
allotted, is listed below : 



SUBJECTS WHICH MAY BE TAKEN IN ONE TERM OR LESS. 

General Agriculture. Plant and Animal Nutrition ; Fertilizers 
and Manures; Breed;-, Breeding and Feeding; Farm Machinery; 
Farm Drainage; Veterinary Science; Bacteriology; Injurious 
Insects and Fungi ; Crops and Crop Production ; Farm Garden- 
ing; Carpentry; Blacksmithing; Farm Accounts; Business Law. 

8 



106 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Horticulture. Injurious Insects; Injurious Fungi; Bacteriol- 
ogy; Propagation of Plants; Vegetable Gardening; Spraying 
and Spraying Machines ; Fruit Culture ; Economic Botany ; 
Ornamental Gardening; Greenhouse Construction and Manage- 
ment. 

SUBJECTS WHICH MAY BE TAKEN IN A ONE YEAR'S COURSE IN 
AGRICULTURE. 

General Chemistry ; Agricultural Chemistry ; Cryptogamic 
Botany ; Laboratory Botany ; Plant Variation ; Landscape Gar- 
dening ; Laboratory Horticulture ; Pomology ; Vegetable Gar- 
dening ; Invertebrate Zoology ; Laboratory Zoology ; Entomol- 
ogy; Stock Feeding; Poultry Industry; Dairy Practice; Veter- 
inary Science; Agricultural Physics; Agricultural Engineering; 
Business Law ; Carpentry ; Forge Work. 

SUBJECTS WHICH MAY BE TAKEN IN A TWO YEAR'S COURSE IN 
AGRICULTURE. 

first Year. Rhetoric; Elementary Physics; General Chemis- 
try ; Agricultural Mechanics ; Cryptogamic Botany ; Laboratory 
Botany; Invertebrate Zoology; Laboratory Zoology; Drawing; 
Business Law; Entomology; Laboratory Horticulture; Pomol- 
ogy ; Vegetable Gardening ; General Botany ; Carpentry ; Forge 
Work. 

Second Year. Laboratory Chemistry; Biological Chemistry; 
Agricultural Chemistry ; Vertebrate Zoology ; Physiology ; Dis- 
section ; Veterinary Science; Stock Feeding; Plant Variation; 
Landscape Gardening; Laboratory Horticulture; Geology; 
Agricultural Physics; Agricultural Engineering; Dairying; Stock 
Feeding; Poultry Industry: Dairy Practice; Bacteriology. 

Short Winter Course in Dairying 

The Course in Dairying is intended to meet the needs of those 
who wish to fit themselves for managers of creameries and 
cheese factories. If the course is pursued during two terms, and 
two seasons' satisfactory work is performed in a butter or cheese 
factory, the student will be granted a certificate of proficiency. 

This course begins on the Tuesday following the last Friday of 
January, and continues six weeks. 

An outline of the subjects taken up in this course follows: 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 107 

First Winter. Plant and Animal Nutrition; Diseases of Dairy 
Animals; Milk. Butter and Cheese; Cows, — Breeding, Handling 
and Judging; Building and Furnishings; Barns, Creameries, 
etc. ; Accounts. 

Second Winter. Milk, Butter and Cheese; Bacteriology of 
the Dairy; Veterinary Science; Boiler and Engine; Business 
Law ; Carpentry ; Feeding of Cows. 

Short Special Course in Horticulture 

In March of 1900 a special two weeks' course in Horticulture 
was given ; and, if the number of applicants warrant the under- 
taking, the course will be again offered in the spring of 1901. 

There is crowded into this short course all of the practical, 
helpful information possible. It is necessarily somewhat in the 
nature of an extended farmers' institute, and a special effort is 
made to outline future work for the students. The work in- 
cludes a study of soils, fertilizers, fruit culture, vegetable garden- 
ing, propagation, insect and fungus enemies and remedies. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Maine Agricultural Experiment Station owes its existence 
to an act of Congress, approved March 2, 1887, popularly known 
as the Hatch Act. The act of the legislature accepting the Con- 
gressional grant made the Station a department of the University 
of Maine. 

The affairs of the Station are considered by an advisory coun- 
cil consisting of a committee of the trustees of the University, 
the president of the University, members of the Station staff, 
and representatives from the State Board of Agriculture, the 
State Pomological Society, and the State Grange. The recom- 
mendations of the council are referred to the trustees for ratifi- 
cation. The Station receives $15,000 annually from the general 
government. 

The inspection of fertilizers, the inspection of concentrated 
commercial feeding stuffs, and the testing of the graduated glass- 
ware used in creameries, are entrusted to the Station through its 
director, who is responsible for the execution of the public laws 
relating to these matters. 

The Station publishes the account of its work in bulletin form. 
The bulletins for a year form a volume of about 200 pages and 



108 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

make up the annual report. Bulletins which contain matter of 
immediate value to practical Agriculture are sent free of cost to 
the entire mailing list of the Station. On request, the name of 
any resident of Maine will be placed on the mailing list of the 
Station. Bulletins which contain the record of experiments in- 
volving the technical language of science, and containing detailed 
data are sent to Station workers and others interested in the 
science of agriculture but are not sent to farmers unless they 
are specially asked for. The annual report of the Station is also 
bound with the Agriculture of Maine, copies of which can be 
had on application to the Secretary of the Maine Board of Agri- 
culture, Augusta, Maine. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 1 00. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



The College of Engineering provides instruction along the 
lines indicated by the divisions made below. Two years of gen- 
eral studies, including the natural sciences, mathematics, modern 
languages, philosophy and economics, are followed by two of 
technical training. Opportunity is offered for special work in 
addition to that of the required courses. The college comprises : 

The Civil Engineering Course 

The Mechanical Engineering Course 

The Electrical Engineering Course 

The Civil Engineering Course 

The object of this course is to give the student a knowledge of 
mathematics, mechanics, and drawing, experience in the care 
and use of engineering instruments, and a drill in the application 
of mathematical principles and rules, with a view to fitting him 
at graduation to apply himself at once to engineering work. 
The course is planned to furnish not only technical instruction, 
but also the basis of a liberal education. 

The methods of instruction are recitations, lectures, original 
problems, work in the testing laboratories, field practice, and 
designing, including the making of original designs and the prep- 
aration of the necessary drawings. Effort is made to acquaint 
the student with the best engineering structures, and with 
standard engineering literature. 

The engineering building contains recitation rooms, designing 
rooms, testing laboratories, drawing rooms, and instrument 
rooms, and is well equipped. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in 
residence, or two years' in absence, including the presentation of 
a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of Master of Science. 



no 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Three years after graduation upon the presentation of a satis- 
factory thesis and proofs of professional work, he may receive 
the degree of Civil Engineer. 

STUDIES OF THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE 

For Declamations and Themes see page 51; for Military Science see page 89. 

Freshman Year. 



Fall Term— is weeks. 



Hours. 

... 2.5 
... 2.0 
... 3.0 

... 4.0 



Eh3, Rhetoric, p. 51 

Ms2, Algebra, p. 65 

Ms4, Trigonometry, p. 65.... 
M15, German, p. 54 or ) 

M127, German, p. 54 ) 

Drl, Drawing, p. 70 |5-0 

Dr2. Math. Drawing, p. 70, 8 w... f3.0 
Chi, General Chemistry, p. 71. . . 2.5 
Ch3, Laboratory Chemistry, p.71 f2-0 



Spring Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 

Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51 2.5 

Ms3, Algebra, p. 66 3.0 

Msl, Solid Geometrv, p. 66 or ) „ n 
Msl9, Sph. Trigonometry, p. 66 \ ' *' v 
M16, German, p. 53 or / . ft 

M128, German, p. 55 \ *'" 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 5 w... f3.0 
Dr3, Mechanical Drawing, p. 70. J5.0 
Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71... 2.5 
Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry, p.71 f2.0 



Sophomore Year. 



M119, French, p. 52 or i ft 

M121, French, p. 53 \ ,u 

Ms6, Analytical Geometrv, p. 66. 5.0 

Psl, General Physics, p. 68 5.0 

Dr4, Mechanical Drawing, p. 70. fo.O 
Dr6, Descriptive Geometry, p.70 2.5 
Cel8, Sanitary Science, p. 84 1.0 



M120, French, p. 53 or J 

M122, French, p. 53 > 

Ms7, Calculus, p. 66 

Ps2, General Physics, p. 68 . 
Ps5, Laboratory Physics, p. 
Dr7, Descriptive Geometry, 
Cel, Plane Surveying, p. 82 
j Ce2, Field Work, Surveying, 



2.0 

5.0 
2.5 
fa.O 
1.5 
..... 2.5 
p.82. f4.0 



.70. 



Junior Year. 



Pll, Psychology, p. 60 

Ms8, Calculus, p. 66 

Msl2,Adv.Int. Calculus, p. 67 ov\ 
Ms20, Solid Analytical Geome- | 
try, p. 67 or ! 

B113, Geology, p. 75 or { 

Ps8, Math. Physics, p. or 69 
Ps9, Adv. Physics, p. 69 (t5hrs.) J 
Ce3, Railroad Engineering, p. 82. 

Ce4, Railroad Work, p. 83 

Ce5, Highway Engineering, p. .83 
Ce6,Mechanics, p. 83 



2.5 

t5.0 
2.0 
5.0 



Cv2, English History, p. 61 

P12, Logic, p. 60 .. 

Msl3, Adv. Int. Calculus, p. 67 or 
Msl5, Diff. Equations, p. 67 or 
Ms9, Descriptive Astronomy, 

p. 67 or 
Ps7, Advanced Optics, p 
PslO, Adv. Lab. Physics, 

(t5 hrs.) 
Dr5,General Drawing, p 
Dr8, Stereotomy, p. 71, 5 
Ce9, Higher Surveying,p.83,8w 
Ce7, Mechanics, p. 83 



. 69 or 
p. 69 



70,5w. 
w. 



.. 2.5 
.. 2.5. 

1 



2.5 



112.0 
. 5.0 



Senior Year. 



Cvl3, Political Economy, p. 62. . . 2.5 
Cvl5, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 2,5 

Ce8, San. Engineering, p. 83 or 

Mathematics, or Physics 

as in Junior Year 2.5 

CelO, Hydraulics, p. 83 2.5 

Cel2, Structures, p. 84 5.0 

Cell, Hydraulics Field Work, 

p. 84, 6 w. \ f7.0 

Cel4, Designing, p. 84, 12 w. 



2.5 



2.5 
2.5 
5.0 



Cvl4, Political Economy, p. 62... 

Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 
History, p. 62 

MslO, Practical Astronomv, p. 67 

Cel3, Structures, p. 84 

Cel5, Designing and Thesis? ") 
Work p. 84 or | 

Math., or Physics, as in >fl2.0 
Junior Y"ear, elective I 
with f5 hours of Cel5... J 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



III 



The Mechanical Engineering Course 

This course is designed to ( give such a training in mathematics, 
mechanics, the principles of mechanism, in drawing, and manual 
arts as shall make the student competent to deal successfully 
with the problems of mechanical engineering. The technical 
courses include the geometry of machinery, gearing, with prob- 
lems and practice, the transmission of motion and power by belts, 
cams, couplings and links, the study and designing of the valve 
and link motions used in the steam engine, analytical mechanics, 
hydro-mechanics, the strength of materials, the expansion of 
steam, the construction of steam engines, and the designing of 
steam boilers. 

The methods of instruction include lectures, recitations, prac- 
tice in the various branches of shop-work, the solution of 
problems, the testing of theoretical results by comparison 
with modern machinery, the inspection of important plants, and 
the use of journals and catalogues. 

The recitation rooms and designing rooms are in Wingate 
Hall. The machine shop is equipped with iron working and 
wood working machinery of the most approved forms. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in 
residence, or two years' in absence, including the presentation of 
a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of Master of Science. 
Three years after graduation, upon the presentation of a satis- 
factory thesis and proofs of professional work, he may receive 
the degree of Mechanical Engineer. 



STUDIES OF THE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSE 
For Declamations and Themes see page 51; for Military Science see page 89. 



Freshman Year. 



Fall Term— 16 weeks. 

Hours. 

Eh3, Rhetoric, p. 51 2.5 

Ms2, Algebra, p. 65 2.0 

Ms4, Trigonometry, p. 65 3.0 

M15, German, p. 54 or / ln 

M127, German, p. 54 j *' u 

Drl, Drawing, p. 70 t5.0 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 8 w.. . |3.0 
Chi, General Chemistry, p. 71... 2.5 
Ch3, Laboratory Chemistry.p. 71. T 2.0 



Spring Term- 



-18 WEEKS. 

Hours. 



p. 66 



Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51... 
Ms3, Algebra, p. 66. .. 
Msl, Solid Geometry, 

or 
Msl9, Sph. Trigonom., p. 
M16, German, p. 54 or ) 

M128, German, p. 55 j *' 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 5 w. . . 
Dr3, Mechanical Drawing, p. 70. 
Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71. 



2.5 
3.0 

2.0 

4.0 

t3.0 
f5.0 
2.5 



Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry, p. 71 f2.0 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Sophomore Year. 



M119, French, p. 52 or ( 9 ft 

M12L, French, 53 1 u 

Ms6, Analytical Geometry, p. 66. 5.0 

Psl, General Physics, p. 6& 5.0 

Dr6, Descriptive Geometry, p. 60 2.5 
Mel, Carpentry, p. 85, 12 w. 

Mel9, Machine Drawing, p. 85}- t"-0 

6 w 



M120, French p. 53 or I „ A 

M122, French, p. 53 j iA) 

Ms7, Calculus, p. 66 5.0 

Ps2, General Physics, p. 68 2.5 

Ps5, Lahoratory Physics, p. 68... |5-0 
DrT, Descriptive Geometry, p. 70 15 

Me2, Forge Work, p. 85 |5-0 

Me3, Kinematics, p. 85 J5.0 



Junior Year. 



Pll, Psychology, p. .60 

Ms8, Calculus, p. 66 

B113, Geology, p. 75 or ") 

Msl2, Advanced Integral Cal- 
culus, p. 67 or 

Ms20, Solid Analytical Geom- 
etry, p. 67 or 

Ps8, Advanced Physics, p. 69 
or 

Ps9,Laboratory Physics, p. 69f5J 

Ce6, Mechanics, p. 83 

Mel, Machine Work, p. 85 or ) 

Psll, Electrical Measurement 
and Testing, p. 69, elec- [ 
tive with f4hrs. of Me4J 

Ee9, Dynamos, p. 88 



\ 2 - 



> ts.o 



2.0 



Cv2, English History, p. 61 

P12, Logic, p. 60 

Ce7, Mechanics, p. 83 

Me9, Machine Design, p. 86 

Me4, Machine Work. p. 85 or 

Msl3, Advanced Integral Cal- 
culus, p. 17, 2.5 hrs. or 

Msl5, Differential Equations, 
p. 67, 2.5 hrs., or 

Ps7, Advanced Optics, p. 69 
2.5 hrs. or 

PslO, Laboratory Physics, p. 69 
t5 hrs., elective with f5 
hrs. of Me4 



2.5 
2.5 

5.0 
3.5 



flO.O 



Senior Year. 



Cvl3, Political Economy, p. 62... 2.5 
Cvl5, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 2.5 

Me8, Structures, p. 86. 2.5 

MelO, Hydro-Mechanics, p. 86.... 2.5 

Mell, Heat and Steam, p. 86 2.5 

Mel2, Steam Boiler Design, p.1 

86 or 
Mathematics or Physics, >tl2.0 

as. in Junior year,' elec- j 

tive with |5 hrs. of Mel2 J 



2.5 



Cv 14, Political Economy, p. 62... 
Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 ... 2.5 

EelO, Dj r namo Laboratory Work, 

p. 89, 1st 9 w t5.0 

Mel3, Testing, p. 86, 2d9 w 2.5 

Mel4, Steam Engine, p. 86 3.5 

Mel5, Steam Engine Design, p. 1 

87, 9 w., and 
Mel6, Thesis Work, p. 87,9 w.or | 

Mathematics or Physics >tP>.0 
as in Junior year, elec- 
tive with f5 hrs. of | 
Mel5 and Mel6, j 



The Electrical Engineering Course 
This course is intended to provide a thorough preparation in 
the scientific principles involved in the practice of electrical en- 
gineering ; to explain and. illustrate the application of these 
principles to the design, construction, installation and running 
of apparatus with which the electrical engineer has to deal, and 
to give practice and experience in the care and management of 
the same. 

For the first two years the Electrical and Mechanical En- 
gineering courses are identical. During the junior year stu- 
dents in electrical engineering take up electricity and magnetism, 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



113 



and dynamo design. This work is followed in the senior year 
by recitations, lectures, drawing room and laboratory work in. 
direct and alternating currents. 

During this time the student also acquires a knowledge of shop 
work, mechanical drawing, mathematics, physics, mechanics, 
steam engineering and kindred subjects. Beside the technical 
work he receives training in English, French and German, logic, 
history, political economy and constitutional law. 

The equipment has been largely increased during the past year 
and the facilities for laboratory work are ample. The apparatus 
includes most of the standard forms of direct and alternating 
current machines and instruments. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed grad- 
uate work in residence, or two years' in absence, including the 
presentation of a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of 
Master of Science. Three years after graduation, upon the 
presentation of a satisfactory thesis and proofs of professional 
work, he may receive the degree of Electrical Engineer. 



STUDIES OF THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COURSE 

For Declamations and Themes see page 51; for Militai*y Science see page 89. 

Freshman Year. 



Fall Term -18 weeks. 



Spring Term— 15 weeks. 



Rhetoric, p. 51 

Algebra, p. 65 

Trigonometry, p. 65 

German, p. 54 or | 
'. German, p. 54 f ' 

Drawing, p. 70 

Math. Drawing, p. 70, 8 w 
General Chemistry, p. 71. 



Hours. 
... 2.5 
... 2.0 
... 3.0 



Eh3, 
Jkls2, 
Ms4, 
M15 
M12' 
Drl, 
Dr2, 
Chi, 
Ch3, Laboratory Chemistry, p. 71 t 2 -0 



4.0 

t5.0 
t3.0 
2.5 



p. 26, 



Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51 . 
Ms3, Algebra, p. 66... 
Msl, Solid Geometry 

or 
Msl9, Sph. Trigonom., p. 66 ) 
M16, German, p. 54 or t 

M128, German, p. 55 { 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 5 w . 
Dr3, Mechanical Drawing, p. 70 
Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71.. • 



Hours. 
.. 2.5 



3.0 
2.0 



4.0 

t3.0 
f5.0 
2.5 



Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry, p. 71 f2.0 



Sophomore Year. 



M119, French, p. 52 or / ft 

M121, French, p. 53 ( - ,u 

Ms6, Analytical Geometry, p. 66, 5.0 

Psl, General Physics, p. 68 5.0 

Dr6, Descriptive Geometry, p.70, 2.5 

Mel, Carpentry, p. 85, 12 w ) +7 n 

Mel9, Machine Draw., p. 85,6 w \ T ' ,u 



M120, French, p. 53, or t n 

M122, French, p. 53 ) w,u 

Ms7, Calculus, p. 66 5.0 

Ps2, General Physics, p. 68 2.5 

Ps5, Laboratory Physics, p. 68.. t"-0 
Dr7. Descriptive Geometry, p. 70 1 .5 

Me2, Forge Work, p. 85 f5-0 

Me3, Kinematics, p. 85 t5.0- 



114 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Junior Year. 



2.5 
2.5 



2.5 



Pll, Psychology, p. 60 

Ms8, Calculus, p. 66 

B113, Geology, p. 75 or ) 

Msl2, Advanced Integral Cal- | 

cuius, p. 67, or 
Ms20, Solid Analytical Geome- | 

try, p. 67, or I 

Ps8, Advanced Physics,p.69,or [ 
Ps9, Laboratory Physics, p. 69, | 

f5.0, or 
Psl4, Electrical Measurement j 

and Testing, p. 69, f5.0 J 
Psll, Electrical Measurement 

and Testing, p. 69 t*-0 

<Ce6, Mechanics, p. 83 5.0 

Eel, Electricity and Magnetism, 

p.87 2.0 

Me4, Machine Work, p. 85 f4.0 



Cv2, English History, p. 61 2.5 

P12, Logic, p.60 2.5 

Ce7, Mechanics, p. 73 5.0 

Me9, Machine Design, p. 86, or"| 
Msl3, Advanced Integral Cal- | 

culua, p. 67, 2.5 or 
Msl5, Differential Equations, { s s 

p. 67, 2.5, or 
Ps7, Advanced Optics, p. 69 

2.5, or 
PslO, Lab. Physics, p. 69, f5.0 
Ee2, Electricity and Magnetism, 

and Dynamo Design, p.98 3.0 
Me4, Machine Work, p. 85 f5.0 






Senior Year. 



-Cvl3, Political Economy, p. 62... 
Cvl5, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 

Mell, Heat and Steam, p. 86. ... 
Ee3, Electrical Machinery, p. 87, 
Ee5, Design of Direct Current 

Machines, p. 8f 
Ee7, Laboratory Work, Direct 

Currents, p. 8S , 

Eel3, Alternating Currents, p. 89, 



2.5 

2.5 
2.5 
2.5 

.. t7.0 

t5.0 
2.5 



Cvl4, Political Economy, p. 62. . . 2.5 

Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 
History, p. 62 

Mel4, Steam Engine, p. 86, or 
Mathematics, or Phy- 
sics, as in Junior year. 

Ee4, Alternating Current 

Machinery, p. 88, 1st 9 w.. 

Ee6, Design of Alternating Cur- 
rent Mach., p. 88, lst9 W...U0.O 

Ee8, Laboratory Work, p. 88, 1st 

9 w t5.0 

Eel4, Electrical Signalling, p. 89, 

2nd, 9 w 2.5 

Eel6, Thesis Work, p. 89, 1st 9 w.tl5.0 



2.5 



5.0 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 1 1 5 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 



The College of Pharmacy comprises : 
The Pharmacy Course 
The Short Course in Pharmacy 



The Pharmacy Course 

This course is offered in response to a demand for a thorough 
training, both general and technical, for those who are to become 
pharmacists. It aims to combine a broad general culture and 
a thorough preparation along its special lines, with the design of 
affording both the intellectual development necessary for the well 
rounded professional or business man, and the necessary tech- 
nical training. To this end, it includes the same instruction in 
modern languages, civics, and the sciences, offered in other 
•college courses. 

Instruction in pharmaceutical studies is given by means of 
lectures, recitations, and tests, supplemented by work in the 
laboratories of chemistry and pharmacy. It embraces qualita- 
tive, quantitative, and volumetric analysis, toxicology, bac- 
teriology, prescriptions, and the preparation of pharmaceutical 
compounds, and original investigations. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in 
residence, or two years' in absence, including the presentation 
of a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of Master of 
Science. 



n6 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



STUDIES OF THE PHARMACY COURSE 
For Declamations and Themes see page 51; for Military Science see page I 
Freshman Yeak. 



Eh3, 
Ms2, 
Ms4 
M15, 
M12; 
Drl, 
Dr2, 
Chi, 
Ch3, 



Fall Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 
Rhetoric, p. 51 .'- 2.5 


Algebra, p. 65 

Trigonometry, p. 65 

German, p. 54 or / 


2.0 

3.0 

. 4.0 


, German, p. 54 \ '" 

Drawing, p. 70 

Math. Drawing, p. 70, 8 w. 
General Chemistry, p. 71. . 


. t5.0 
. f3.0 
. 2.5 



Spring Term— 18 weeks. 



Laboratory Chemistry, p. 71 t--0 



Hours. 
... 2.5 
... 3.0 

2.0 



Eh4, Rhetoric, p. 51 

Ms3, Algebra, p. 66 

Msl, Solid Geometry, p. 66or 

Msl9, Sph. Trigonometry, p. 66 

M16, German, p. 54 or ) . n 

M128, German, p. 55 i * -u 

Dr2, Math. Drawing, p. 70, 5 w... t3.0 

Htl, General Botany, p. 78 |5-° 

Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71 . . . 2.5 
Ch4, Laboratory Chemistry, p.71 |2-0 



Sophomore Year. 



Mil, French, p. 53 or ) 

M121, French, p. 53, (2hrs.) and J 4.0 
M17, German, p. 55, (2.5 hrs.l ) 

Psl2, General Physics, p. 68 2.5 

Ch5, Inorganic Chemistry, p. 71. 2.5 
Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72.|10.0 

Bll, General Biology, p. 74. . . 2.5 

B12, Laboratory Biology, p. 74... t5.0 



M12, French, p. 53 or 

M122, French, p. 53 (2 hrs.) and 

M18, German, p. 55(2.5 hrs.) 

Psl3, General Physics, p. 68 

Ps5, Laboratory Physics, p. 68.. 
Ch6, Inorganic Chemistry, p. 72. 
Chl5, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72 
Ht8, Histology of Plants, p. 79 

9 w. 
Agl3, Bacteriology, p. 78, 9 w. 



4.0 

2.5 

|5.0 
2.5 

t7.0 

t5.0 



Junior Year. 



Pll, Psychology, p. 60 2.5 

M17, German, p. 55 or I ~ 

M13, French, p. 53 I ° 

Ch7, Organic Chemistry, p. 71. •• 2.5 
ChlO, Analytical Methods, p. 72.- 1.0 
Chl6, Quantitative Analysis, p. 72tl0.0 
Agl, Biological Chemistry, p. 76. 2.5 
Pm5, Inorganic Pharmacognosy, 

p.81 .. 2.5 



Ch8, Organic Chemistrv, p. 72 . . . 2.5 
Ch21, Toxicology and Urinalysis, 

p. 73 f2.0 

Ag2, Biological Chemistry, p. 76, 5.0 

B19, Physiology, p. 75 2 5 

B110, Laboratory Physiology,p.75 |5.0 
Pm6, Organic Pharmacognosy, 

p. 81 4.0 



Senior Year. 



Cvl3, Political Economy, p. 62.. 2.5 
Cvi5, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 2.5 

Pm2, Pharmacy, p. 80 5.0 

Pm3, Laboratory Pharmacy, p.81tl2.0 
Pm7, MatericaMedica, p. 81. ... 2.5 



P12, Logic, p. 60 or ) 

Cvl4, Political Economy, p. 62 J 2.5 
Cvl6, Constitutional Law and 

History, p. 62 2.5 

Pm4, Pharmacopoeia, p. 81 5.0 

Pm8, Thesis Work, p. 81, 9 w fl--0 

Pin 11, Prescriptions, p. 82 2.5 

Agl5, Laboratory Bacteriology, 

p. 78,9 w flO.O 



The Short Course in Pharmacy 
This course is designed for those who,, for lack of time or for 
other reasons, are unable to take the four years' course in phar- 
macy. The more general educational studies of the full course 
are omitted, but as broad a range of subjects is offered as can be 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



ir; 



undertaken without sacrifice of thoroughness in the technical 
work. The course corresponds, in general, to the usual full 
course of the pharmaceutical college. The work required of the 
student will occupy his whole time during the college year of 
nine months, and will usually exclude work in drug stores dur- 
ing term time. 

Students who complete this course in a satisfactory manner 
receive the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

STUDIES OV THE SHORT COURSE IN PHARMACY 

For Military Science see page 89. 
First Year. 



Fall Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 
Ps3, Elementary Physics, p. 68.. 2.5 
Chi, General Chemistry, p. 71 . . . 2.5 
Chl4, Qualitative Analysis, p. 72,fl2.0 

Pml, Pharmacy, p. 80 5.0 

Pm5, Inorganic Pharmacognosy, 

p. 81 2.5 



Spring Term— 18 weeks. 

Hours. 
Ps4, Elementary Physics, p. 68.. 2.0 

tl.O 
2.5 



Ps6, Laboratory Physics, p. 68. 
Ch2, General Chemistry, p. 71... 
Chl6, Quantitative Analysis, "1 

p. 72, 9 w. ( 

Chl9, Volumetric Analysis, p. f ' 

83, 9 w. J 

Htl, General Botany, p. 78 

Pm6, Organic Pharmacog., p. 81 



fl4.0 



F5.0 
4.0 



Second Year. 



Ch7, Organic Chemistry, p. 71... 2.5 
Agl, Biological Chemistry, p. 76, 2.5 

Pm2, Pharmacy, p. 80 5.0 

Pm3, Laboratory Pharmacy, p. SI, fl2.0 
Pm7, Materia Medica, p. 8*1 2.5 



Ch8, Organic Chemistry, p. 72... 2.5 
Ch21, Toxicology and Urinalysis, 

P. 73... f2.0 

Ht8, HistT of Plants, p. 79, 9 \v. / .. n 
Agl3, Bacteriology, p. 78, 9 w. ( Ta-U 
Prn4, Pharmacopoeia and Pre- 
scriptions, p. 81 5.0 

Pm9, Pharmacy Readings, p. 82. t5.0 
Pml0,Laboratory Pharmacy,p.82 |5.0 
Pmll, Prescriptions, p. 82 2.5 



Il8 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



Faculty 



A BR AM WlNECARDNER H ARRIS, Sc. D., LL. I). 

President of the University. 

George Enos Gardner, M. A., 
Dean and Professor of Lazv. 

Allen Ellington Rogers, M. A., 
Professor of Constitutional Law. 

William Emanuel Walz, M. A., LL. B., 
Professor of Lazv. 

Arthur Wellington Price, B. A., LL. B., 
Instructor in Law. 

Charles Hamlin, M. A., 
Lecturer on Bankruptcy. 

Lucilius Alonzo Emery-, LL. D., 
Lecturer on Roman Law. 

Andrew Peters Wiswell, B. A., 
Lecturer on Evidence. 

Louis Carver Southard, M, S., 
Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. 

Forest John Martin, LL. B., 
Lecturer on Pleading and Practice. 

Hugo Clark, C. E., 

Lecturer on Equity Pleading. 

Ralph Kneeland Jones, B. S., 

Librarian. 



UNIVERSITY Of MAINE 1 19 

The School of Law was opened to students in 1898. It occu- 
pies rooms in the Exchange Building, at the corner of State and 
Exchange streets, Bangor. In this city are held annually one 
term of the U. S. District Court, five terms of the Maine 
Supreme Judicial Court, one term of the Law Court, and daily 
sessions of the Municipal Court. The library of the school con- 
tains about twenty-five hundred volumes, including full sets of 
the reports of the Supreme Courts of the United States, Maine, 
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode 
Island, and Ohio, the reports of the Court of Appeals of New 
York, the American Decisions, American Reports, American 
State Reports, the Lawyers' Annotated Reports, the leading 
text-books, and the leading periodicals. 

ADMISSION 

Graduates of any college or satisfactory preparatory school 
are admitted to the school as candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws without examination. Other applicants must 
give satisfactory evidence of the necessary educational qualifi- 
cations for the pursuit of the required course of study. These 
will be fixed in each case, on a consideration of its merits. 

Special students, not candidates for a degree, will be admitted 
without examination, and may pursue any studies for which 
they are prepared. 

Students from other law schools of good standing are ad- 
mitted to classes in this school corresponding to classes in the 
schools from which they come, upon the production of a certifi- 
cate showing the satisfactory completion of the prior work in 
such schools. 

Students from law offices are admitted to advanced standing 
upon passing a satisfactory examination upon the earlier sub- 
jects of the course. 

Members of the bar of any state are admitted to the senior 
class, without examination, as candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 

The school is not committed exclusively to any one method 
of instruction, and recognizes the value of lectures by able 
men, and the profit to be found in the use of standard text- 



120 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

l)Ooks, but the great stress is placed upon the study of selected 
cases, and most of the work is carried on in this way. It is 
believed that through the case the student can best come at and 
comprehend the controlling principles of the law, and that in no 
other way can he get so firm a grip and so vital a comprehension 
of them. "Through the case to the principle," may perhaps ade- 
quately indicate the standpoint of the school in the matter of 
method. 

Particular stress is placed upon the Practice Court, which is 
held once a week as a part of the work of the school, and in 
which every student is required to appear regularly. The ques- 
tions of law are in all instances made to arise from the pleadings 
prepared by the students, and briefs, summarizing the points 
involved and the authorities cited, are submitted to the presiding 
judge. During the present year members of the Penobscot Bar 
have served in the capacity of judge, and it is expected that their 
services may be secured hereafter. Jury trials are frequently 
held, the records of recent cases actually tried before the 
Supreme Court sitting at nisi prius being used for that purpose. 

The aim and spirit of the school are eminently practical, the 
purpose being to equip men for the every day duties of the prac- 
ticing attorney. 

COURSE OF STUDY 

The course of study covers three years, in accordance with the 
requirements for admission to the bar in the State of Maine. 
College graduates, however, may be able to complete the course 
in two years. The school year consists of thirty-two weeks, and 
is divided into the fall, winter, and spring terms, of eleven, ten, 
and eleven weeks respectively. 

EXPENSES 

The annual tuition fee is $60. The graduation fee is $10. 
There are no other charges. 

Board and furnished rooms, with light and heat, may be ob- 
tained in the most convenient locations, at a price ranging from 
$3 to $7 a week. In other parts of the city lower rates may be 
obtained. It is believed that expenses in this, as well as in other 
departments of the University, are lower than in any other col- 
lege of New England. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



At the completion of the course, the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws is conferred. Upon the completion of one year's pre- 
scribed work in residence, or two years' in absence, including the 
presentation of a satisfactory thesis, the degree of Master of 
Laws will be granted. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



COMMENCEMENT 



The Commencement exercises of 1900 were as follows : — 

Saturday, June 9 : Junior Exhibition. 

Sunday, June 10 : Baccalaureate Sermon, by Rev. George L. 
Hanscom. Newark, N. J. 

Monday, June 11: College Convocation, including reports of 
departments and student enterprises, and the awarding of prizes ; 
Class Day Exercises ; Public Exercises of Beta Theta Pi in 
connection with its 25th Anniversary. 

Tuesday, June 12 : Laying the corner stone of the Drill Hall ; 
Receptions by the Fraternities ; President's Reception. 

Wednesday, June 13 : Commencement Exercises ; Commence- 
ment Dinner ; Meeting of the Alumni Association ; Alumni Re- 
union. 

CERTIFICATES AND DEGREES 

Certificates upon completing the Short Course in Pharmacy were 
presented to : 

William Henry Crowell, Middletown, Conn. 
George Pearson Larrabee, Pride's Corner. 
DeForest Reed Taft, Winchester, N. H. 
The Bachelor's degree was conferred upon the following 
persons : 

Harry Woodward Beedle, B. M. E. (in Electricity), South 

Gardiner. 
Alan Laurence Bird, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Rockland. 
Frank Harvey Bowerman, B. C. E., Victor, N. Y. 
William Joseph Burgess, B. M. E., Calais. 
Agnes Rowena Burnham, B. Ph., Oldtown. 
Walter Neal Cargill, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Liberty. 
Wilfred Harold Caswell, B. M. E. (in Electricity), 

Bridgton. 
Wilkie Collins Clark, B. S., Skowhegan. 
James Edward Closson, B. S. (in Chemistry), Monson, 
Mass. 









UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 123 

Clinton Llewellyn Cole, B. C. E., Pleasantdale. 
Harry Ashton Davis, B. M. E., Orono. 

Henry Frank Drummond. B. M. E. (in Electricity), Bangor. 
Julian Stnrdevant Dunn, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Cum- 
berland. 
Herbert Davidson Eaton, B. S. ' v in Preparatory Medicine). 

Bangor. 
Philip Ross Goodwin, B. C. E., Randolph. 
Charles Perley Gray, B. S. (in Preparatory Medicine), 

Oldtown. 
George Otis Hamlin, B. M. E., Orono. 
Malcolm Cole Hart, B. C. E., Willimantic. 
Howard Andrew Hatch, B. C. E., Lindenville, Ohio. 
James Arthur Hayes, B. S. (in Chemistry), Randolph. 
Guy Alfred Hersey, B. C. E., Bangor. 

Clifford Dyer Holley, B. S. (in Chemistry), Farmington. 
Leon Herbert Horner, B. S., Springfield, Mass. 
William Goldsbrough Jones, B. S., Bucksport. 
Thomas Francis judge, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Bidde- 

ford. 
Flarry Hewes Leathers, B. M. E., Bangor. 
Charles Hutchinson Lombard, B. C. E., Portland. 
Alexander Love, B. C. E., East Bluehill. 
John Gardner Lurvey, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Portland. 
Frank McDonald, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Portland. 
Howard Lewis Maddocks, B. C. E., Skowhegan. 
Edwin Jonathan Mann, B. M. E., West Paris. 
Wilbur Louis Merrill, B. M. E. (in Electricity), East 

Parsonsfield. 
Fred Carleton Mitchell. B. S., West Newfield. 
Frank Henry Mitchell, B. S. (in Chemistry), Charleston. 
George Ferguson Murphy, B. C. E., Alewive. 
Frank Albert Noyes, B. M. E. * (in Electricity), Berlin, 

N. H. 
Alden Bradford Owen, B. M. E. (in Electricity), West 

Pembroke. 
Arthur Southwick Page, B. C. E., Fairfield. 
DeForest Henry Perkins, B. Ph., North Brooksville. 
Daniel Lara Philoon, B. S. (in Chemistry), Auburn. 
Charles Omer Porter, B. C. E., Cumberland Mills. 



124 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Percy Leroy Ricker, B. S. (in Preparatory Medicine), 

Westbrook. 
Charles Alphonso Robbins, B. Ph., Patten. 
Clarence Herbert Rollins, B. M. E. (in Electricity), 

Veazie. 
Frank Morris Rollins, B. S. (in Chemistry), Waterville. 
Leo Bernard Russell, B. C. E., Farmington. 
Stanley Sidensparker, B. S., Warren. 
Clinton Leander Small, B. A., Auburn. 
Edward Henry Smith, B. M. E., East Sullivan. 
Freeman Ames Smith, B. S., Thorndike, Mass. 
Adah Snowdeal, B. A., Augusta. 

Grosvenor Wilson Stickney, B. M. E., Clinton, Mass. 
Edward Moore Strange, B. C. E., Calais. 
Howard Clinton Strout, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Orono. 
Edwin Morrel Tate, B. C. E., South Corinth. 
Fred Foy Tate, B. C. E., South Corinth. 
Fred Hale Vose, B. M. E. (in Electricity), Milltown, N. B. 
Frank Elijah Webster, B. M. E., Patten. 
Benjamin Thomas Weston, B. C. E., Madison. 
Wallace Augustus Weston, B. C. E., Madison. 
Joseph Onon Whitcomb, B. Ph., Morrill. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon : 
Lewis Appleton Barker. Bangor. 
Harold Elijah Cook, Vassalboro. 
John Frederick Dolan, Banger. 
Paul Frank Foss, Weston. 
Hiram Gerrish, Brownville. 
Bernard Gibbs, Glenburn. 
Claude Dewing Graton, Burlington, Vt. 
Ernest Emery Hobson, Palmer, Mass. 
Edward Hutchings, Brewer. 
Freeland Jones, Bangor. 
Verdi Ludgate, Lubec. 
Matthew McCarthy, Bangor. 
John Daniel Mackay, Lake Ainslee, Cape Breton. 
Chester Horace Mills, Skowhegan. 
Harold John Phillips, Skowhegan. 
Howard Pierce, Blaine. 
Arthur Wellington Price, North Waldoboro. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 125 

Agnes May Robinson, Sherman Station. 

Waiter Joseph Sargent, Brewer. 

Lewis Harry Schwartz, Lawrence, Mass. 

Frank Jackson Small, Oldtown. 

James Bissett Stevenson, Farmington. 

Dana Leo Theriault, Caribou. 

Frederick Everett Thompson, Bangor. 

William Henry Waterhouse, Oldtown. 

Dana Scott Williams, Lewiston. 
The degree of Master of Science, upon the presentation of a 
a satisfactory thesis, and proof of three years' professional work, 
was conferred upon : 

Allen Rogers, B. S., Orono, class 1897. 
The degree of Mechanical Engineer was conferred upon the 
following persons, upon presentation of satisfactory theses, and 
proof of professional work extending over a period of not less 
than three years: 

William Cross Holden, B. M. E., Lynn, Mass., class of 1892. 

Perley Walker, B. M. E., Orono, class of 1896. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon : 
William Thomas Haines, B. S., LL. B., Waterville, class of 
1876. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Engineering was conferred 
upon : 

Jonathan Vernet Cilley, B. C. E., Cruz del Eji, Argentina, 
class of 1883. 
The various prizes were awarded last year as follows : 
The Kidder Scholarship to Henry Wilmott Chadbourne, Matta- 
wamkeag. 

The Prentiss Prize to Maurice Barnaby Merrill, Stillwater. 

The Prentiss Declamation Prize to Edith Mae Bussell, Old- 
town. 

The Libbey Prize to LeRoy Harris Plarvey, Orono. 

The Walter Balentine Prize to Lewis Robinson Cary, Bow- 
doinham. 

The Pharmacy Prize to George Pearson Larrabee, Pride's 
Corner. 



126 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



APPOINTMENTS 



Speakers at Commencement, June, 1900. 
Charles Pcrley Gray, Oldtown; Ernest Emery Hobson, Pal- 
mer, Mass. ; William Goldsborough Jones, Bucksport ; Frank 
McDonald, Portland ; Fred Carleton Mitchell, West Newfield ; 
Alden Bradford Owen, West Pembroke; Charles Omer Porter, 
Cumberland Mills ; Arthur Wellington Price, North Waldoboro ; 
Fred Hale Vose, Milltown, N. B. ; Joseph Onon Whitcomb, Mor- 
rill. 

Speakers at the Junior Exhibition, June, 1900. 
Fred Hanson Bogart, Chester, Conn. ; George Harold Davis, 
Auburn ; Gertrude Lee Fraser, Oldtown ; Henry Herbert Leon- 
ard, Orono ; Fred Holt Lowell, North Penobscot ; Bertrand Clif- 
ford Martin, Fort Fairfield ; Maurice Barnaby Merrill, Stillwater ; 
Alson Haven Robinson, Orono. 

Speakers at the Sophomore Prize Declamation Contest, 
December, 1899. 

Enoch Joseph Bartlett. Monroe; Melvin Merle Blaisdell, Fort 
Fairfield ; Edith Mae Bussell, Oldtown ; Harold Malcolm Carr, 
Sangerville; Henry Ernest Cole, Pleasantdale ; Henry Carter 
French, Rumford Center ; Frank Winthrop Kallom, South Ber- 
lin, Mass. ; Patrick Edward McCarthy, Lewiston. 

Members of the Phi Kappa Phi. 
Walter Neal Cargill, Liberty ; Clinton Llewellyn Cole, Pleas- 
antdale ; Philip Ross Goodwin, Randolph ; James Arthur Hayes, 
Randolph; Charles Hutchinson Lombard, Portland; John Gard- 
ner Lurvey, Portland; Alden Bradford Owen, West Pembroke; 
Fred Hale Vose, Milltown, N. B. ; Benjamin Thomas Weston, 
Madison ; Wallace Augustus Weston. Madison. 



university of maine 127 

Students Receiving General Honors. 

Walter Neal Cargill, Liberty; Clinton Llewellyn Cole, Pleas- 
antdale; Harry Ashton Davis, Orono; Philip Ross Goodwin, 
Randolph ; James Arthur Hayes, Randolph ; Clifford Dyer Hol- 
ley, Farmington ; Charles Hutchinson Lombard, Portland ; Ed- 
win Jonathan Mann, West Paris; Fred Carleton Mitchell, West 
Newfield ; Alden Bradford Owen, West Pembroke ; Grosvenor 
Wilson Stickncy, Clinton,- Mass. ; Fred Hale Vose, Milltown, 
N. B.; Benjamin Thomas Weston, Madison; Wallace Augustus 
Weston, Madison; Joseph Onon Whitcomb, Morrill. 

Students Receiving Special Honors. 

SENIORS. 

Clinton Llewellyn Cole, Pleasantdale, Civil Engineering. 
Clifford Dyer Holley, Farmington, Chemistry. 
Charles Hutchinson Lombard, Portland, Civil Engineering and 
Mathematics. 

Benjamin Thomas Weston, Madison, Mathematics. 
Wallace Augustus Weston, Madison, Civil Engineering. 

JUNIORS. 

Thomas Buck, Orland, Mathematics. 
George Harold Davis, Auburn, Physics. 
Benjamin Franklin Faunce, Norway, Physics. 
LeRov Harris Harvey, Orono, Natural Historv. 



128 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Beck, William Porter, B. S., 

Caswell, Wilfred Harold, B. M. E., 

Cole, Clinton Llewellyn, B. C. E., 

Goodwin, Philip Boss, B. C. E., 
Hayes, James Arthur, B. S., 
Holley, Clifford Dyer, B. S., 



Bethel, Ohio, Mt. Ver- 
[non House. 
Bridgton, Mt. Vernon 
[House. 
Pleasantdale, Mt. Ver- 
[non House. 
Randolph, Mrs. S.Gee. 
Randolph, Mrs. S. Gee. 
Farmington, Mrs. L. J. 
[Hayes. 
Lombard, Charles Hutchinson, B. C. E., Portland, Mt. Vernon 

[House. 
Mitchell, Frank Henry, B. S., Charleston, Miss A. T. 

[Emery. 
Orono, Mt. Vernon 
[House. 
Oldtown, Oldtown. 
Westbrook, Mrs. S. 
[Gee. 
Bethel, Vt., Mrs. Jas. 
[Walton. 
Milltown, N. B., Mt. 
[Vernon House. 



Packard, Roscoe Milliken, M. A. 

Pierce, Louise Norris, B. A., 
Ricker, Percy Leroy, 

Spaulding, Perley, 

Vose, Fred Hale, B. M. E., 



SENIORS 

Bartlett, Charles William, North New Portland, K. 2. 

[House. 
Bartlett, Mark Jonathan, Montville, 209 Oak Hall. 

Bartlett, Wales Rogers, Center Montville, 209 Oak Hall. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



129 



Bixby, Johu Harold, 

Bixby, Oscar Merrill, 

Boardman, William Harris 

Bogart, Fred Hammond Hanson 

Buck, Henry Alfred, 

Buck, Thomas, 

Gary, Lewis Robinson, 

Clark, Samuel, 
Cobb, Arthur Leroy, 
Crosby, Charles Elmer, 
Davis, Edmund Ireland, 
Davis, Fred Merrill, 
Davis, George Harold, 
Faunce, Benjamin Franklin, 
Fitzgerald, Elsie Eunice, 
Folsom, Harold Morrill, 
Fraser, Gertrude Lee, 
French, Joseph Edward, 
Goodwin, George Estyn, 
Hamlin, Emily, 
Harvey, Clifford Dawes, 
Harvey, LeBoy Harris, 
Howe, Ernest Judson, 

Hoyt, Henry Perez, 
Keller, Percy Raymond, 
Leonard, Herbert Henry, 
Libby, Wilbert Andrew, 
Lowell, Frank Holt, 

Merrill, Maurice Barnabay, 
Martin, Bertrand Clifford, 
Martin, Fred Lewis, 
Mitchell, Charles Augustus, 
Nickerson, Percy Lee, 
Pritham, Harry Charles, 
Robinson, Alson Haven, 



Anson, $. r. A. House. 

Anson, *. I\ A. House. 

Calais, Mr. H. H. Finn. 

Chester, Conn., 109 Oak Hall. 
Bucksport, 102 Oak Hall. 

Orland, Mr. H. H. Finn. 



Bowdoinham. 



Prof. G. M. 



[Gowell. 
Waterville, A. T. ft. House. 

South Vassalboro, 206 Oak Hall. 
Albion, The Commons. 

Bangor, Bangor. 

Lewiston, 203 Oak Hall. 

Auburn, K. 2. House. 

Norway, 307 Oak Hall. 

Oldtown, Oldtown. 

Oldtown, Oldtown. 

Oldtown, Oldtown. 

So. Chesterville, Folsom House. 
Gorham, NT. H., K. 2. House. 
Orono, Mrs. L. Hamlin. 

Lewiston, #. r. A. House. 

Orono, Mrs. F. L. Harvey. 

South Lancaster, Mass., 

[Ill Oak Hall. 
Fort Fairfield, A. T. ft. House. 
West Rockport, A. T. ft. House. 
Orono, Mr. G. Leonard. 

North Gorham, 211 Oak Hall. 
North Penobscot, Mr. O. T. 
[Goodridge. 
Stillwater, Stillwater. 

Fort Fairfield, *. r. A. House. 
Franklin, 106 Oak Hall. 

West Newfield, $. r. A. House. 
Swanville, 206 Oak Hall. 

Freeport, 205 Oak Hall. 

Orono, Rev. P. J. Robinson. 



130 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Ross, Mowry, 

Thompson, Samuel Day, 
Varney, Lewis Goodrich, 
Ward, Thomas Hale, 
Watson, Ernest Lauren, 
Watts, Frank Erwin, 
Woodbury, Stephen Edward, 
Wormell, Ralph Geddes, 



West Woodstock, Conn., 

Folsom House. 
Bangor, B.e.n. House. 

Windham Centre, K. 2. House. 
Fryeburg, 302 Oak Hall. 

Brunswick, 302 Oak Hall. 

West Falmouth, Stillwater. 

Beverly, Mass., 307 Oak Hall. 
Waterville, A. T. n. House. 



JUNIORS 



Adams, Nathan Herbert, 
Bacheldor, Arthur Willis, 
Barrows, William Edward, Jr., 
Bartlett, Enoch Joseph, 
Blaisdell, Melvin Merle, 
Boland, Marion Genevieve, 

Bussell, Edith Mae, 
Butman, James Warren, 
Carr, Harold Malcolm, 
Chadbourne, Henry Wilmott, 
Chase, Nathan Ajalon, 
Cole, Henry Ernest, 
Davis, Alfred Ricker, 
Davis, Samuel Prince, 
Delano, Edward Warren, 
Duren, Harry Elwood, 
Durgan, George Washington, Ji 
Dyer, William Norman, 
Eldridge, Walter Hamptou, 
Elliott, Wesley Clarendon, 
Farrington, Herbert Oscar, 
Fessenden, Lothrop Edwiu, 
Foster, Arthur Brookhouse, 
Freeman, George Leonard, 
French, Henry Carter, 
Gilbert, Eugene Clarence, 
Greene, James Marquis, 



Notch, Folsom House. 

North Sebago, 305 Oak Hall. 
Augusta, B. 9. IT. House. 

Monroe, 304 Oak Hall. 

Fort Fairfield, 102 Oak Hall. 
Worcester, Mass., Mt. Vernon 
[House. 
Oldtowu, Oldtown. 

Readfield, A. T. ti. House. 

Sangerville, K. 2. House. 

Mattawamkeag, Main St. 

South Faris, Mr. H. Perkins. 
Pleasantdale, 311 Oak Hall. 
Auburn, K. 2. House. 

Portland, B. 9. II. House. 

Abbot Village, B. 9. n. House. 
Richmond, 204 Oak Hall. 

., Sherman Mills, 307 Oak Hall. 
Harrington, A. T. Q. House. 
Bucksport, Folsom House. 

Patten, 111 Oak Hall. 

Portland, <£. r. A. House. 

Bridgton, Mrs. C. S. Marsh. 
Beverlj r , Mass., Mrs. L.J. Hayes. 
West Gray, K. 2. House. 

Rumford Center, 310 Oak Hall. 
Orouo, Mr. T. Gilbert. 

Putnam, Conn., Mr. Win. Page. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



131 



Hamilton, Andrew George, 
Hamlin, Horace Parlin, 
Hennessy, Harold Stewart, 
Holmes, Fred Eugene, 
JohnsoD, Elbridge Augustus, 
Kallom, Frank VVinthrop, 

Kelly, Burchard Valentine, 

Kneeland, Henry Wilton, 
Knight, Perley Charles, 

Knowles, Lida May, 

Lowe, Sumner Sturdivant, 
Lyon, Alpheus Crosby, 
McCarthy, Patrick Edward, 
Mansfield, Harold Wilder, 
Margesson, Charles William, 
Mitchell, Ezra Getchell, 
Moore, Byron Newcomb, 
Mosher, Percival Hildreth, 
Moultou, Frank Augustus, 
Pease, Irving, 
Peck, Luther, 
Pressey, Frank Ethelbert, 
Racklifte, Clinton Nathan, 
Pice, Marie Cecilia, 
Ross, Edwin Bishop, 
Kussell, Roy Elvert, 
Sewell, Herbert Willis, 
Silver, Arthur Elmer, 
Stephens, Charles Walter 
Swasey, Lawrence Mabry, 
Thombs, William Brackett, 
True, Edwin Stanley, 
Warren, John Clifford, 
Watson, Alvin Morrison, 
Wheeler, Allen Francis, 
Whipple, Albert Lawrence, 
Whittier, Ralph, 



Orono, Mr. II. Hamilton. 

Orouo, Mrs. L. Hamlin. 

Bangor, B. G. n. House. 

East Machias, 202 Oak Hall. 
Portland, Mrs. A. Cowan. 

South Berlin, Mass., A. T. ft. 
[House. 
Centerville, Mass., Main St. 

Searsport, 202 Oak Hall. 

South Gorham, Mr. O. T. Good- 
ridge. 
Bangor, Mt. Vernon House. 
Cumberland, Mrs. A. Cowan. 
Bangor, <£. r. A. House. 

Lewiston, 207 Oak Hall. 

Union, Main Street. 

Bangor, <£. r. A. House. 

Auburn, 207 Oak Hall. 

Biddeford, A. T. n. House. 

Pleasantdale, Mrs. Wallace. 
Limington, Mr. J. P. Speareu. 
Bpan's Corner, Main Street. 
Monson, Mass., 201 Oak Hall. 
Bangor, Bangor. 

Easton, 312 Oak Hall. 

Bangor, Mt. Vernon House. 
Bangor, B. G. II. House. 

Livermore, 310 Oak Hall. 

Wilton, $. r. A. House. 

Silver's Mills, 312 Oak Hall. 
Oldtown, Oldtown. 

Limerick, 311 Oak Hall. 

Gorham, A. T. O. House. 

Portland, B. G. II. House. 

Westbrook, K. 2. House. 

Portland, K. 2. House. 

Brunswick, A. T. ft. House. 
Solon, A. T. ft. House. 

Bangor, A. T. ft. House. 



132 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



SOPHOMORES 



Baker, Ernest Linwood, 
Beaner, Archie Ray, 
Blaisdell, Geneva, 

Bradford, Luther Cary, 
Burns, William Bruce, 
Carr, Cleora May, 
Chandler, Robert Flint, 
Chesley, Lloyd Almond, 
Coffin, Leroy Melville, 
Cole, Winfield Lee, 
Collins, Fred, 
Conner, Ralph Melvin, 
Cooper, Ralph Leonard, 
Crabtree, Leroy Brown, 
Crocker, Henry Kennedy, 
Cunningham, Pearl Garfield, 
Davis, Rodney Clinton, 
Dinsmore, Sanford Crosby, 
Dorticos, Carlos, 
Douglass, Frank Libby, 
Ellstrom, Victor Edwin, 

Everett, Chester Steele, 
Fitz, Guy Bearce, 
Foster, Samuel Joshua, 
French, Harold Francis, 
Gage, Arthur Willard, 

Goodridge, Oren Leslie, 
Goodwin, Burton Woodbury, 
Graves, Sherley Preston, 

Hadlock, George Harmon, 
Harris, Liston LeRoy, 
Harris, Philip Howard, 



Portland, 301 Oak HalL 

Waldoboro,Mr. Geo. Thompson. 
Fort Fairfield, Mt. Vernon 

[House. 
Turner, B. e. II. House. 

Fort Fairfield, <i>. r. A. House. 
Oldtown, Oldtown. 

New Gloucester, <£. r. A. House. 
Oldtown, Oldtown. 

Freeport, Mrs. L. P. Harris. 
Biddeford, A. T. ft. House. 

Bar Harbor, K. 2. House. 

East Wilton, Folsom House. 
Belfast, A. T. ft. House. 

Hancock, K. 2. House. 

Rockland, B. 6. n. House. 

Oldtown, A. T. Q. House. 

Lewiston , 203 Oak Hall. 

Dover, B. 0. n. House. 

Woodfords, K. 2. House. 

West Gorham, Mayo's Block. 
Fitchburg, Mass., Mr. Wm. 

[Page. 
Attleboro, Mass., 107 Oak Hall. 
Auburn, <S>. r. A. House. 

Bingham, K. 2. House. 

Glenburn, Mr. J. F. Sanford 
Dennisport, Mass., Mr. L. P. 

[Harris. 
Orono, Mr. O. T. Goodridge. 
Berry Mills, $. r. A. House. 
Northeast Harbor, Mr. H. W. 
[Finn. 
Portland, B. 9. n. House. 



Orono, 
Portland, 



Mr. G. L. Harris. 
B. G. II. House. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



133 



Hartford, Edward Goodnow, 
Hilliard, John Heddle, 
Hinchliffe, Henry John, 
Hinckley, Frances Augusta, 
Jordan, Alfred Carroll, 
Kittredge, Claude Abbott, 
Larrabee, Benjamin True, 
Leary, Thomas Edward, 
Lewis, Charles Wesley, 
Lord, Cecil Arthur, 
Loud, Warren Cornelius, 
McCready, John Hollis, 
McCullough, Frank, 
Maxfield, Amj'- Ines, 
Montgomery, Carroll Leland, 
Mullaney, Roderick Edward, 
Murphj-, Clarence Alexander, 
Norwood, Harry Emery, 
Patrick, Stephen Edmund, 
Perry, Estelle M., 

Pestell, Walter, 
Porter, Ernest Albee, 
Robinson, Veysey Hiram, 
Rogers, Herbert Kemp, 

Sawyer, Harry Ansel, 
Sheahan, Harold Vose, 
Simpson, Paul Dyer, 
Sinclair, Karl Augustus, 
Small, Eben Emmons, 
Small, Guy Osman, 
Small, Silas Gilman, 
Smith, Howard Ausburn, 

Smith, Lewis Eaton, 
Soper, Henry Melville, 
Stewart, George Thomas, 
Stone, Charles Wesley, Jr., 



Calais, Mr. H. W. Finn. 

Oldtown, $. r. A. House. 

Worcester, Mass., <J>.r.A.House. 
Oldtown, Oldtown. 

Casco, 303 Oak Hall. 

Farmington, A. T. ft. House. 
Cumberland Mills, K. 2. House. 
East Hampden, 306 Oak Hall. 
Skowhegan, 304 Oak Hall. 

Bar Harbor, Middle Street. 

Caribou, 208 Oak Hall. 

Houlton, A. T. ft. House. 

Lynn, Mass., B. 8. II. House. 
Sandypoint, Mt. Vernon House. 
Woodfords, <£. r. A. House. 
Bangor, A. T. ft. House. 

Mansfield, Mass., 201 Oak Hall. 
Hampden Corner, 306 Oak Hall. 
Gorham, Dr. Whitcomb. 

North Castine, Mt. Vernon 

[House. 
Lynn, Mass., 208 Oak Hall. 
Eustis, K. 2. House. 

Waterville, Mayo's Block. 

Wellfleet, Mass., Mr. J. F. 

[Sanford. 
Portland, 211 Oak Hall. 

Dennysville, 301 Oak Hall. 

Sullivan, B. 0. n. House. 

Maiden, Mass., 303 Oak Hall. 
East Thorndike, Stillwater. 

Kingfield, Mrs. Smith. 

Lubec, 308 Oak Hall. 

North Truro, Mass., Mr. Fred 
[Abbott. 
North Reading, $. r. A. House. 
Oldtown, Oldtown. 



Auburn. 
Milo, 



106 Oak Hall. 
Milford. 



134 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Strickland, Eoy Elgin, 
Towse, Arthur Roy, 
Treworgy, Isaac Emery, 
Tucker, George Edwin, 
Usher, Robert Cleveland, Jr., 
Wharft, Edward Mansfield, 
White, Ralph Henry, 
Whitney, Harvey David, 
Wiley, Mellen Cleaveland, 



South Paris, 
North Lubec, 
Surry, 

Monson, Mass., 
Plainville, Conn 
Danforth, 
East Machias, 
Auburn, 
Bethel, 



212 Oak Hall. 

301 Oak Hall. 

106 Oak Hall. 

204 Oak Hall. 
, K. 2. House. 
<£. r. A. House. 

309 Oak Hall, 
<£. r. A. House. 

305 Oak Hall. 



FRESHMEN 



Alden, Carl Howard, 
Andrews, Guy Clayton, 
Averill, Roy Samuel, 
Baker, Robert Clinton, 
Bassett, Ralph Smith, 
Bean, Paul Lenard, 
Bearce, IraM., 
Berry, Edward Robie, 
Boynton, Walter Melrose, 

Brann, George Samuel, 
Breed, Everett Mark, 
Broadwell, Edwin Sherman. 

Brown, Ernest Carroll, 
Brown, Horace A., 
Brown, Homer Francis, 
Buker, Edson Bayard, 
Campbell, Will Delbert, 
Case, Albert Deering, 
Chace, Archibald Eastward, 
Chaplin, Carroll Sherman, 
Chase, Clifford Gray, 
Clark, Jerome Borden, 
Clifford, Edward Clinton 
Colcord, Lincoln Ross, 
Day, Charles Iven, 
Day, Eugene Garfield, 



Gorham, Mr. J. Myers, 

Gorham, Mr. O. T. Goodridge. 
Milltown, Mr. Elijah Webster. 
Taunton, Mass., <£. r. A. House. 
Dover, Oldtown. 

Saco, A. T. ft. House. 

Hebron, Mr. J. P. Spearin. 

Lynn, Mass., B. e. n. House. 
Damariscotta Mills, Mrs. 

[McPheters. 
Dover, Bangor. 

Brewer, Mrs. T. Shatley. 

Cleveland, Ohio., Prof. J. H. 

[Huddilston. 
Gorham, Mrs. James Walton. 
Bradley, Bradley. 

Saco, Mrs. C. S. Marsh. 

Brownville, Mr. O. C. Dunn. 
East Dixfield, Mrs. C. S. Marsh. 
Lynn, Mass., A. T. ft. House. 
Montclair, N. J., A. T. ft. House. 
Portland, 4>. V. A. House. 

Baring, 308 Oak Hall. 

Smithville, Mr. Wm. Colburn. 
West Falmouth, <f>. r. A. House. 
Searsport, K. 2. House. 

Damariscotta, A. T. ft. House. 
Madison, 112 Oak Hall. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



135 



Dorticos, Phillip, 
Dugan, George Andrew, 
Eastman, Thomas Frank, 
Far well, Harry Hancock, 

Fifield, Fred Victor, 
Five, Owen Lovejoy, 
Flynt, Roy Horton, 
French, George Augustus, 
Giles, Clyde Irving, 

Gill, William Everett, 
Grady, Michael Charles, 
Gray, Maurice Lee, 
Gregory, Herbert Stanley, 

Gulliver, Edward Charles, 
Haley, Harry Dennet, 
Hall, Guy, 
Haskell, Roger, 
Herbert, Thomas Carroll, 
Holmes, Ernest Randall, 
Hopkins, Leonard Otis, 



Woodfords, 
Bangor, 

Ashland, N. H., 
Boston, Mass., 

East Eddington, 

Brooklin, 

Augusta, 

Portland, 

Skowhegan, 

Camden, 
Bangor, 
Cape Rosier, 
Elmira, N. Y 

Portland, 

Gardiner, 

So. China, 

Westbrook 

Richmond, 

Eastport, 

So. Framingham, Mass. 



K. 2. House. 

Bangor. 

K. 2. House. 

Mrs. William 

[Hurd. 

112 Oak Hall. 

Spaulding House. 

B. 0. II. House. 

Rev. C. E. Lund. 

Mr. Geo. Thorn p- 

[son. 

<£. r. A. House. 

Bangor. 

Spaulding House. 

., Mrs. James 

TWalton. 

Mr. Geo. Thompson. 

K. 2. House. 

Mr. Fred Abbot. 

, Mr. L. P. Harris. 

104 Oak Hall. 

A. T. fi. House. 



Hopkins, Ralph Thomas, Bangor, 

Hunt, Fred Howard, East Thornclike 

Johnstone, Leslie Ingalis, Milford, 

Jones, Henry Neely, Camden, Mr 

Jones, Vaughn, Bangor, 
Kingsbury, Ralph Waldo Emerson, So. Brewer, 

Lawrence, Leonard Alexander, Eastport, Mrs 



Leighton, Clifford Henr}^, 
Little, Leslie Eugene, 
Livermore, Scott Page, 
McFad} T en, James, Jr., 
Mclntire, Walter Draper, 
Marsh, Chas. Fred Dudley, 
Millett, Bernard Fearin, 
Monk, Holman Waldron, 



Addison, 
Bucksport, 
Lynn, Mass.. 
Milo, 



A. T. Q. House. 

B. 0. n. House. 
Stillwater. 

Milford. 

J. P. Spearen. 

K. 2. House. 

212 Oak Hall. 

James Walton. 

Orono House. 

Mr. Fred Abbott. 

B. 0. II House. 

211 Oak Hall. 



Orange, Mass., Mr. O. C. Dunn. 
Dexter, Mr. L. P. Harris. 

Norway, Mr. L. P. Harris. 

No. Buckfield,Mr. J. P. Spearen. 



136 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Morse, Frank Leander Staples, 
Noyes, Harry Warren, 
Olivenbaum, John Emanuel, 
Paine, Allen Thatcher, 

Parker, Edward Alton, 
Pearson, Ralph Howard, 
Perkins, Conner Arthur, 
Phinney, Alverdo Linwood, 

Porter, Karl Byron, 
Quimby, John Herman, 

Richardson, Roy Henry, 

Ricker, William Jewett, 
Sampson, Charles Henry, 
Sawyer, James Herbert, 
Scott, Walter Erwin, 
Small, Alvah Randall, 
Small, Lottie Luella, 
Smith, Elmer Garfield, 
Smith, Leroy Clifton, 
Snell, Roy Martin, 
Soderstrom, Godfrey Leonard, 
Soule, Seth Hersey, 
Stanley, Byerly S. 
Staples, Joseph Henry, 
Talbot, Fred William, 
Talbot, James Rich, 
Taylor, Alec Gladstone, 
Taylor, Elliot Williams, 

Taylor, Howard Smith, 
Taylor, Thomas Francis, 
Terry, Orange Fanning, 

Tucker, John Voden, 
Turner, Roland Lee, 



Thomaston, Mr. J. P. Speareu. 
Berlin, N. H., Mr. Fred Abbott. 
Jemtland, <t>. r. A. House. 

Brewster, Mass., Mr. Fred 

[Abbott. 
Skowhegan, K. 2. House. 

Guilford, Mr. Elijah Webster. 
Bucksport, K. 2. House. 

Cash's Corner, Fitzgerald 

[House. 
Oldtown, A. T. ft. House. 

Goodale's Corner, Mr. Fred 

[Abbott. 
Norwell, Mass., Mr. J. P. 

[Spearen. 
Turner, Mr. J. P. Spearen. 

Gorham, Mr. O. T. Goodrich. 
Saco, A. T. ft. House. 

Dexter, <i>. V. A. House. 

So. Portland, Fitzgerald House. 
Auburn, Mt. Vernon House. 



Portland, 



K. 2. House. 



East Exeter, Mrs. Jas. Walton. 
Lagrange, 311 Oak Hall. 

Hartford, Conn., $. r. A. House. 
Gorham, Mr. J. Myers. 

McKinley, Mr. Warren Reed. 
Bangor, Bangor. 

Andover, Mr. J. P. Spearen. 
East Machias, 309 Oak Hall. 
No. Sullivan, B. 9. II. House. 
Hyannis, Mass., Mrs. Wm. 

[S. Hurd. 
Bangor, K. 2. House. 

Bangor, Bangor. 

Bridgeport, Conn., B. 6. II. 

[House. 
Stillwater, Stillwater. 

Boothbay Harbor, A. T. ft. House. 



/ 


13 


d 


\ fc 






\ 


Zi 


Ol 




UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



137 



Webber, Mary Frances, 
Webster, Francis Howe, 

Weeks, Carl Wellington, 
White, Alphonso, 



Bangor, Bangor. 

Stockton Springs, Mr. J. P. 
[Spearen. 
Masardis, Mrs. C. S. Marsh. 
North Sebago.Mr. Warren Reed. 



SHORT PHARMACY COURSE 



Allen, Roy Parker, 

Berry, Richard Henry, 
Hinchliffe, Henry John, 
Sanford, John Foy, 



SOPHOMORES 

North Sedgwick, Mr. Charles 
[Crowell. 
Montville, Mr. Charles Crowell. 
Worcester, Mass., 4>.r.A.House, 
Lewiston, Park St. 



FRESHMEN 



Buckley, William Wallace, 

Burns, Frank Percy, 
Clarke, Ralph E., 
Leighton, Percy Augustine, 
Pierce, James Albert, 

Plummer, Merrill, 
Tate, Walter Maurice, 
Woodman, Benjamin Jordan. 



Winchendon, Mass., 107 Oak 
[Hall. 
Westbrook, 201 Oak Hall. 

Freeport, Mr. L. P. Harris. 

West Cumberland, Stillwater. 
Stockton Springs, Mr. George 
[Thompson. 
Addison, Mr. John Lacy. 

South Corinth, Mrs. Strout. 
Westbrook, 207 Oak Hall. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Campbell, Will Delbert, 
Cunningham, Pearl Garfield. 
Gray, Lena Dillingham, 
Haynes, Evangeline M., 
Jones, Grace Mutell, 
King, Fred Wilber, 
Lewis, Charles Wesley, 
Peterson, Emelia, 

Russell, Maurice Wheeler, 



East Dixfield, 

Patten, 

Old Town, 

Old Town, 

Orono, 

Charleston, 

Skowhegan, 



Mrs. C. S. Marsh. 

A. T. Q. House. 

Old Town. 

Old Town. 

Main St. 

<S>. r. A. House. 

304 Oak Hall. 



Scarboro Beach, Mr. Fred Gil- 
bert. 
Augusta, B. e. II. House. 



10 



138 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Scoville, Sorensen L., 

Simmons, Melvin Harry 
Webber, Fred Garfield. 



South Ohio, N. S-., B. O. II. 

[House. 

Hallowell, Miss A. T. Emery. 

Orono, Pine Street. 



SHORT COURSES IN AGRICULTURE 



Abbott, Linn Boynton, 

Bailey, Sanford Eugene, 
Chubbuck, Alfred Seeley, 
Doe, Arthur William, 
Downing, Herbert Plummer, 
Ellms, Ralph, 
Farnsworth, Omar Libbey, 
Fenderson, Garnett Tibbetts, 
Harvey, Charles Irving, 
Hobert, Clifton Robert, 
Hodge, Sidney Fisher, 

Hurley, Martin Farncis 
Jordan, Edwin Roscoe, 
Knowles, Roland Foster, 
Leavitt, Nellie Louise, 
Patch, Charles Albert, 
Peary, Charles, 
Percival, Willis Clarence, 
Skillings, Frank Elbertis, 
Wells, Charles Nelson, 
White, Edward Libby, 
Whitmore, Horace Chauncey, 



Cumberland Mills, Mrs. T. 

[Shatuey. 
Webber, Mrs. T. Shatney. 

East Fairfield, Mrs Martin. 
Presque Isle, Mrs. T. Shatney. 
Ripley, Mrs. C. S. Marsh. 

Dexter, Mrs. T. Shatney. 

Caribou, Mrs. T. Statney. 

South Stetson, Mr. Wm. Page. 



Wateiford,Vt 
Stillwater, 
North Dixmont, 



Mrs. T. Shatney. 

Stillwater. 

Mrs. James 

[Walton. 

Bangor. 

Stillwater. 

T. Shatney. 



Bangor, 
Stillwater, 
Victor, Mr 

Skowhegan, Prof. Walter Flint. 
West Nevvfield, Mrs. T.Shatney. 
Phillips, Mrs. Martin. 

Owen, Mrs. T. Statney. 

Vassalboro, Mr. Wm. Page. 
Minot, Horticultural Building. 
Bowdoinham, Mrs. T. Shatney. 
Hampden, Bangor. 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL OF LAW 



THIRD YEAR 



Butler, Ernest Cliftoid, Skowhegan, 83 Somerset Street. 

Butterrteld, Benjamin Franklin, Danforth, 4 Spring Street. 

Foster, Nathan Grant, M. A., Webb, 9 Boynton Street. 

Colby College. 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



139 



Jouah, Edwin Bruce, 
Plumstead, Frank, B. A., 

Bates College. 
Thurlough, Harry Harding 



Eastport, 36 Court Street. 

Wiscasset, 265 Main Street. 



Litchfield Corner, 65 Summer 
[Street. 
Weatherbee, Albert Washington, Bangor. 198 Broadway. 



SECOND YEAR 



Dunn. Patrick Henry, 
Higgins, Morris Prescott, 
Lord, Henry, 
McKay, Malcolm, 

O'Halloran, James, 
Ring, Charles, 
Ritter, George William, 
Robinson, 'William Henry, 
Selkirk, Robert William, 



Bangor, North Bangor. 

OrringXon Center, Brewer. 

Bangor, 79 Exchange Street. 
Scotsville, Lake Ainslie, N. S., 
43 First Street. 
Bangor, 74 Jefferson Street. 
Lubec, 65 Summer Street. 

Monson,Mass., 50 Charles St. 
Bangor, 74 Jefferson'Street. 
Wilder, Vt., 265 Main Street. 



FIRST YEAR 



Anderson, Thomas Alexander, 
Bennett, Waldo Horace, 
Fish, Charles Henry, Jr., 
Geary, Thomas Reardon, 
Greeley, Harold Dudley, 

Holman, Charles Vey, 

Harvard College. 
Hopkins, Fred Weston, 
Loud, Herbert Spencer, 
McCormick, Edward Stanley, 
McQuillan, Hugh Dean. 
Mudgett, Ulysses Grant, 
Murray, Edward Patrick, 
Osgood, Burt Stirling, 
Pickard, Herbert Spencer, 
Putnam, Varney Arthur, 
Reid, Charles Hickson, 



Hartland, 27 Forest Avenue. 
Newport, The Lowder. 

Bangor. 65 Sumner Street. 

Whitneyville, 83 Somerset St. 
Minneapolis, Minn., 41 Summer 
[Street. 
New York City, 88 Broadway. 

Bangor, 63 Sixth Street. 

Round Pond, 9 Boynton Street. 
Island Falls, 159 Main Street. 
Portland, 9 Boynton Street. 
Hampden, Hampden, 

Bangor, 190 York Street. 

Kingman, 65 Summer Street. 
Bangor, 117 Exchange Street. 
Danforth, 65 Summer Street. 
Bangor, 60 Lincoln Street. 



140 UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Ross, Harry Francis, Bangor, 144 Exchange Street. 

Harvard College. 

Thorabs, George Warren, Moii3on, 65 Summer Street. 

Violette, Nil Louis, Van Buren, 56 Railroad Street. 

Winn, George Hayes, Lewiston, -43 First Street. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Merrill, John B., Bangor, 26 Jefferson Street. 

Mitchell, Adnah Jones, Augusta, 164 Ohio Street. 

POST, GRADUATE STUDENT 

Price, Arthur Wellington, L.L.B., Bangor, Morse-Oliver Building. 



SUMMARY 

Graduate Students, 13 

Seniors, 46 

Juniors, 64 

Sophomores, 78 

Sophomores, Short Pharmacy, 3 81 

Freshmen, 98 

Freshmen, Short Pharmacy, 8 106 

Special Students, 13 

Short Courses in Agriculture • • 22 

School of Law, Third Year, 7 

Second Year, 8 

First Year 21 

Special, 1 37 

Total, 382 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



141 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Absence from examinations,. 31 

Admission, 38 

by certificate, 47 

by examination, 38 

local examinations for, 40 

of college graduates, 39 

of special students, 39 

preliminary examinations 

for, 39 

to advanced standing, 38 

to School of Law 39 

to short courses 39, 41 

Agricultural course, 103 

Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, 107 

building, 22 

Council 10 

publications, 107 

Agriculture, 76 

College of, 103 

courses 103 

special courses, 105 

Alumni associations 11 

American School in Rome, — 3S 

Appointments 126 

Approved schools 47 

Arts and Sciences, College of, 93 



PAGE 

Associations, 26 

Astronomy, 65 

Athletic field 24 

Bacteriology, 78 

Biological chemistry, 76 

Biology, 74 

Board, 35 

Bond, 38 

Botany, 74, 78 

Buildings and equipment,. ... 20 

Bulletins of the experiment 

station, 28 

Calendar 6 

Catalogue, annual, 27 

short 28 

Certificate, admission by 47 

Certificates, awarded in 1900, . . 122 

in agriculture, 106 

Chemical course, 100 

Chemistry, . . 71 

Civil Engineering, 82 

course, 109 

Civics,. .. 61 

Classical course 93 

Coburn Hall, 21 

Commencement, exercises of, 

1900, 122 



142 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



PAGE 

Commencement, list of speak- 
ers, 1900, 126 

Courses of study, 

Agricultural, 103 

Chemical 100 

Civil Engineering, 109 

Classical, 93 

Electrical Engineering, . . . 112 

Latin Scientific, 95 

Law, 120 

Mechanical Engineering,.. Ill 

Pharmacy, 115 

Preparatory Medical, 101 

Scientific 98 

Special, 105 

Dairy building 23 

Dairying, winter course, 106 

Declamations, 51 

sophomore prize, 37 

Degrees, 32 

advanced, 33 

conferred, 1900, 122 

Departments of instruction, . . 51 

Deposit 38 

Dormitories, 35 

Drawing, 70 

Drill Hall 21 

Drill, military 29,89 

Electrical engineering 87 

course, 112 

Endowment of the University, 19 

Engineering, College of, 109 

English, 51 



PAGE 

Entomology, 75 

Entrance, dates of examina- 
tions, 6, 7, 8 

examinations, 40 

requirements, 43 

Essays, 51 

Establishment of the Univer- 
sity, 18 

Examinations, arrearage,. ... 31 

entrance 40 

rules with regard to, 31 

Excuses, 31 

Executive committee, 9 

Expenses of students, 33, 120 

Experiment station, 107 

building, 22 

Council, 10 

Faculty, University, 12 

School of Law 118 

Fees, laboratory, . . 35 

Fernald Hall, 21 

Field day, 30 

Fraternities, 26 

Fraternity houses, 23 

French, 52 

Geology, 75 

German, 54 

Greek, 58 

Gymnasium, 21 

Herbarium, 25 

Histology, animal, 7S 

plant 79 

History, 61 

Honorary society, 27 



I.NIVERS1TV OF MAINE 



1 43 



PAGE 

Honors 32 

Honors, conferred, 1900, 127 

Horticultural building, 22 

Horticulture, 78 

special course in 107 

Income of the University, 19 

International law, 62 

Italian, 54 

Junior exhibition, 37 

speakers, 1900, 126 

Kidder scholarship, 37 

Bittredge loan fund, 37 

Laboratory charges, 35 

Latin, > 55 

Latin Scientific Course, 95 

Law 62 

School of, 118 

Library, 24 

Loans, — 36 

Loan fund, 37 

Logic, 60 

Machine shop, 22 

Maine Bulletin, 28 

Mathematics,.. 65 

Mechanical engineering, 85 

course Ill 

Medicine, course preparatory 

to, 101 

Military, drill 28, 89 

instruction, 29 

science, courses in, 89 

science, requirements in,.. S9 

uniform, 29 



PAGE 

Mineralogy 74 

Modern languages, 52 

Mt. Vernon House, 23 

Museum, 25 

Oak Hall, 20 

Observatory, 22 

Organization of the Univer- 
sity 91 

Organizations, 26 

Pharmacy, so 

College of, 115 

courses in 115 

Phi Kappa Phi, 27, 126 

Philological Club 27 

Philosophy 60 

Physics, 68 

Physiology, 75 

Political economy, 62 

Preparatory medical course, . . 101 

Prizes, 37 

awarded, 1900, 125 

Publications, 27 

Reading room, 25 

Regulations of the University, 31 

Reports, of the Experiment 

Station, 28 

of standing, 31 

of the University, 28 

Rhetoric, 51 

Rooms, 35 

Scholarship honors 32 

Scholarships 37 

School of Law, admission, 119 



144 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



PAGE 

School of Law, 

Advisory Board, 9 

courses of study, 62, 120 

degrees, 121 

expenses, 120 

faculty 118 

methods of instruction, .. . 119 

Scientific Association, 26 

Scientific course, 98 

Shop 22 

Short catalogue, 28 

Short courses, 105, 116 

Societies, 26 

Sophomore prize declama- 
tions, 37 

speakers, 1899, 126 

Spanish, 54 

Special courses, 105 

Standing committees of the 
faculty, ... 16 

Students, catalogue of, 128 

number of, 140 

standing of, 31 

Studies, quota of, 31, 92 

Tables, explanation of, 92 

Terms, beginning and end of, 6, 7, 8 



PAGE 

Textbooks, 34 

Themes, 51 

Treasurer, 9 

Trustees, Board of, 9 

meetings of, 6, 7 

Tuition, charges, 34 

loans, 36 

University, charter, 18 

buildings and equipments, 20 

circulars, 28 

endowment, 19 

establishment, 18 

Guild 27 

location, 19 

object, 18 

organization, 91 

Studies, 28 

Veterinary science 78 

Wingate Hall, 20 

Winter courses, 106, 107 

Women, admission of, 38 

Worship, public, . 30 

Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, 27 

Zoology, . 74, 75 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



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